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Acoustics

ENTERTAINMENT
March 20, 1988 | CHRIS PASLES
Chorale director William Hall's opinion of the acoustics in Segerstrom Hall at the Orange County Performing Arts Center is not flattering. "I compare the sound in the hall to a CD (compact disk), not to an analogue recording," he said. "There is no ambiance. It is straightforward but has no color, and sound without color is not acceptable." To make matters worse, Hall added, "people can't hear in certain areas on the stage. The singers and the orchestra have difficulty hearing each other.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 23, 1986 | DANIEL CARIAGA
Abe Meltzer, chief consulting acoustician to the Music Center Operating Co. and the Los Angeles Philharmonic, leans back in a chair in a fourth--floor conference room at the Dorothy Chandler Pavilion of the Music Center. A diminutive 59--year--old man of alert manner and a youthful personal style, Meltzer seems at once both wary and mellow--like a man with something up his sleeve. Something magical and mysterious. Something like his $3.5--million plan to fix the acoustics in the Pavilion.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 2000 | RICHARD S. GINELL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Los Angeles Philharmonic has unveiled a new/old shell design for the Hollywood Bowl, and as far as these eyes and ears are concerned, hip-hip-hooray! Preservationists who think the leaking, acoustically sorry present shell is just fine should try to actually hear music at the Bowl sometime.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 26, 1988 | HERMAN WONG, Times Staff Writer
While complaints about acoustics at the Orange County Performing Arts Center are being studied for possible design "refinements," members of the Center's original acoustical team say they remain highly pleased with overall results at the Center's 3,000-seat multipurpose Segerstrom Hall in Costa Mesa.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 24, 1999 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Vibist Stefon Harris has been praised for the past year or so as one of the important new jazz arrivals of the late '90s--and with good cause. His recorded work has been well-crafted, and his live performances, in particular, have been dynamic efforts to find new gold in the sounds of an already well-explored instrument. Tuesday, however, in the first set of a six-night run at the Jazz Bakery, Harris ran into a problem that can impact even far more experienced players: opening-night audio.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 31, 2000 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's Sunday afternoon, and the wail of a saxophone drifts through thesounds of Market Street traffic. In Union Square, rhythmic percussion patterns cut across the rumble of the cable cars and the conversational buzz of the pedestrians. As it turns out, it isn't exactly a saxophone, but the sound of an enterprising street musician performing, amazingly, on an electronic wind instrument accompanied by his own preset rhythm loops.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 13, 2006 | Chris Lee, Special to The Times
When pianist and composer Keith Jarrett takes the stage at Walt Disney Concert Hall tonight for his first solo performance in Los Angeles in almost 25 years, he will be confounding expectations of both his physical limitations and artistic temperament. Hobbled since 1997 by chronic fatigue syndrome, Jarrett has limited himself to a few select solo performances per year; he has found the strain of piano recitals particularly debilitating.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 14, 2003 | Don Heckman, Special to The Times
Pianist Keith Jarrett was about to start the second number of his program Wednesday night at Walt Disney Concert Hall when he was distracted by a rumbling sound -- late arrivals rushing to their seats. Frowning, he turned to his audience and asked, "Do you hear that? It must be the sound of ghost cartoon characters. Creaky boards aren't usually found in new concert halls." Then, about to begin again, he paused a second time to add another comment.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 26, 2001 | DON HECKMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Pianist Hilton Ruiz has been in and around the jazz scene since the 1970s, when, barely into his 20s, he worked with Rahsaan Roland Kirk, Freddie Hubbard, Joe Henderson and others. In addition, despite the fact that he has never quite broken through to high visibility, he has released more than a dozen well-crafted albums, most tinged with Latin rhythms.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 31, 1998 | SUSAN BLISS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Pacific Symphony's plan to feature each of the three medal winners at the 1997 Van Cliburn International Piano Competition in a separate concert ensured that excitement was high as gold medalist Jon Nakamatsu--saved for last--strode onstage at the Irvine Meadows Amphitheatre on Saturday night. His vehicle was Rachmaninoff's Piano Concerto No. 2, in C minor, Opus 18, famous for its power, its passion, its fistfuls of notes. And if one listened carefully, one might just have heard all that.
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