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Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome

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SPORTS
February 24, 1995 | JULIE CART, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Greg Louganis hit his head on the diving board and spilled his blood into the pool at the 1988 Olympic Games, did he have an obligation to disclose to doctors who treated him and to other athletes using the pool that he was HIV-positive?
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SCIENCE
October 15, 2008 | Mary Engel, Times Staff Writer
Fearing that the global economic crisis could cause nations to renege on commitments to fight tuberculosis, new Nobel laureate and HIV co-discoverer Francoise Barre-Sinoussi warned that a drop in TB funding could wipe out gains made against AIDS because so many people suffer from both diseases. "We are at the period of success with antiretroviral treatment" for HIV, Barre-Sinoussi said Tuesday during a teleconference from the Pasteur Institute in Paris.
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NEWS
December 22, 1988 | BETTY CUNIBERTI, Times Staff Writer
In his short life, former ABC television anchorman Max Robinson admitted having many problems: alcohol abuse, racial struggles, career disaster and three failed marriages. But he never publicly acknowledged having the disease that would end his life. Yet in his death at 49, Robinson had his family reveal that he had AIDS so that others in the black community would be alerted to the dangers of the disease and the need for treatment and education.
NATIONAL
September 17, 2008 | Cynthia Dizikes, Times Staff Writer
The HIV epidemic in the United States is a crisis, federal health officials told a House panel Tuesday, urging additional programs to specifically protect and educate African Americans, Latinos and gay and bisexual men -- the groups hardest hit by the virus that causes AIDS.
SPORTS
November 9, 1991 | JULIE CART and RANDY HARVEY, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The prominent NBA player met a beautiful young woman after a road game at a restaurant near the arena and, after a few drinks, asked if he could go home with her. She agreed, with one condition. In return for her companionship, he had to give her a pair of autographed sneakers. When they arrived at her bedroom, he fulfilled his part of the agreement, producing the shoes from his shoulder bag and signing them.
NEWS
September 7, 1990 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Recalling that she served as mayor of San Francisco when AIDS first emerged as a "so-called gay cancer" in 1981, Dianne Feinstein visited a hospice Thursday where AIDS victims go to die and pledged an accelerated state campaign against the disease if she is elected governor. "I was there at the beginning and I hope I'm there at the end," the Democratic nominee told male AIDS victims while touring the 25-bed Chris Brownlie Hospice near Dodger Stadium.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 11, 1991 | VICTOR F. ZONANA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Eight weeks ago, upon returning home from a Fourth of July weekend at the beach with his wife and daughter, actor Brad Davis pulled out a yellow legal pad and drafted a proposal for a book he never got the chance to write. "The purpose of this book is to reveal what it's like to be infected with HIV, to be receiving treatment, and having to remain anonymous at all costs--chronicling how I have done this for over six years," wrote Davis in spare and simple prose.
NEWS
December 9, 1990 | LYNN SMITH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Banking away from the freeways toward the seashore, Laguna Canyon Road fairly sings of the beauty, escape and fun ahead. It skims past a shallow lagoon, then sweeps by towering eucalyptus trees and cattle grazing on hillsides. The road spills out onto Coast Highway and Main Beach, where on a warm fall day the carefree and the bronzed play volleyball and bask in the sunshine.
NEWS
March 18, 1988 | From Reuters
The Saudi government Thursday reported its first cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, saying that seven of the 18 people who contracted the virus had died.
NEWS
March 26, 1987 | United Press International
Hungary said it is setting up a telephone hot line to provide information on AIDS, acquired immune deficiency syndrome, the official news agency MTI reported.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 16, 2008 | Duke Helfand, Times Staff Writer
It is a chilling statistic: 12 million children in sub-Saharan Africa have been orphaned by AIDS. But the figure alone cannot begin to convey the toll of a pandemic that continues to punish vast swaths of the continent. For that, consider the stories of four children featured in an interactive exhibit -- "World Vision Experience: AIDS" -- at Holman United Methodist Church in Los Angeles.
SCIENCE
August 5, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Disheartened by the failures of vaccines and microbicides in blocking HIV transmission, some AIDS researchers are now touting a third possibility: using existing HIV drugs prophylactically. By next year, as many as 15,000 people worldwide will be enrolled in trials to test the concept -- more than are enrolled in all vaccine and microbicide trials combined -- according to a report issued Sunday at the International AIDS Conference in Mexico City. There are seven trials underway or planned.
SCIENCE
August 3, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
Federal officials have been underestimating the number of new HIV infections in the United States by 40% every year for more than a decade, a finding that indicates the U.S. epidemic is much worse than thought, researchers said Saturday. Using sophisticated testing to identify new infections, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention concluded that there are about 56,300 new infections each year, not the 40,000 figure that has been gospel for so long.
NATIONAL
July 31, 2008 | Vimal Patel, Times Staff Writer
President Bush signed a sweeping measure Wednesday that provides $48 billion to combat AIDS and other diseases globally and that also ends a long-standing U.S. ban on foreign visitors and immigrants who are HIV-positive. The travel ban, approved in 1993, was seen by opponents as an anachronism from a period of hysteria surrounding gays. Its repeal, however, does not remove all U.S. travel impediments.
SCIENCE
July 30, 2008 | Thomas H. Maugh II, Times Staff Writer
The number of AIDS deaths worldwide dropped 10% in 2007 because of increasing access to treatment, as did the number of new infections in children, the United Nations reported Tuesday. Condom use and prevention efforts increased in many countries and adolescent sexual intercourse declined in some of the most heavily affected regions, the report says. "In a surprisingly short period of time, there has been a tripling of prevention efforts in some countries," said Dr.
WORLD
February 21, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
After crossing Africa from west to east and back, the central issues that followed President Bush on his tour all came together Wednesday in the white stucco Osu Castle here on the Atlantic shoreline. With gusto, the president declared "that's baloney" to the notion that the United States was preparing to establish military bases in Africa. "Or, as we say in Texas, that's bull," Bush said at a news conference with Ghanaian President John Kufuor.
NEWS
December 31, 1987
The number of AIDS cases in San Bernardino County increased about 140% in 1987, a county health official said. Alexander Taylor, a San Bernardino County epidemiologist, said 75 cases of acquired immune deficiency syndrome were reported to authorities in the county for 1987. Last year, the number of reported AIDS cases was 31.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 27, 1989 | From Reuters
Belgium had 474 reported cases of AIDS by the end of March, 1989, up 40% from the same time last year, the Health Ministry said Monday. A ministry statement said almost 30% of acquired immune deficiency syndrome sufferers caught the disease through heterosexual contact, a figure it said was one of the highest in Europe.
WORLD
February 18, 2008 | James Gerstenzang, Times Staff Writer
With old and young providing testament to the success of a U.S.-funded effort to fight AIDS, President Bush on Sunday called for Congress to renew the program quickly and said that helping Africa was in the national and moral interests of the United States. The program provides readier access to antiretroviral drugs, easing the impact of the disease. But it also puts a strong focus on premarital sexual abstinence, drawing criticism in the U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2008 | Ari B. Bloomekatz, Times Staff Writer
With less than an hour to go in UCLA's 26-hour charity dance marathon, Anthony Barbir shook his hips, raised his hands high into the air and sang along to "We Are Family." By Sunday afternoon, the 20-year-old world arts and cultures student had been on his feet for more than 25 hours . . . and with only an hour left in the fundraiser benefiting pediatric AIDS organizations, he had no plans to slow down. "I feel like I could do it all again!" he yelled over the music.
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