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October 20, 1991 | MARK TWAIN
IN 1867, A YOUNG and not yet very well-known journalist named Samuel Langhorne Clemens, who signed himself Mark Twain, set sail from New York on a ship called the Quaker City for a grand tour of Europe and the Holy Land. His account of the journey, based on newspaper dispatches he had filed en route, was published in 1869 under the title "The Innocents Abroad or The New Pilgrims Progress."
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NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
TourCrafters is offering reasonably priced excursions to Greece that combine a stay in Athens with an Aegean cruise that allows you to sample some of the country's popular islands. The "Iconic Aegean" package includes two nights in Athens, with time to take in the Acropolis as well as an evening of dancing and bouzouki music. The four-day cruise makes stops at Mykonos, Patmos and the Monastery of St. John the Theologian, Rhodes and the village of Lindos and the medieval Old Town, Crete and Santorini.
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ENTERTAINMENT
July 13, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Many of Greece's most valued ancient statues are wearing chains and padded vests, ready for a rare outing. Culture Ministry officials demonstrated Thursday how more than 300 statues from the Acropolis are being packed for a move this fall to a new museum being built at the bottom of the hill.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
ATHENS - Locals called Pittaki Street a "public toilet. " Drug addicts and petty criminals frequented the narrow lane, steps from a popular plaza where tourists exploring Greece angle for shots of the looming Acropolis. The scraggle of remaining residents kept to themselves. Graffiti and broken windows adorned grimy walls. Two dimly illuminating streetlights dangled overhead. "It was a very nasty place where you didn't want to live," Stephania Xydia said as she stood looking down the avenue's 200 feet, dusk spilling over the rooftops.
NEWS
March 21, 1994 | Reuters
Modern artworks by Picasso, Matisse, Chagall and others, estimated as worth more than $500,000, have been stolen from an Athens museum, police said Saturday. The 38 lithographs and prints by some of the world's most distinguished painters and sculptors belonged to a private collection on display at the Goulandris-Horn Foundation since Feb. 7. Prints by Spanish painter Joan Miro, French painter Fernand Leger and Swiss sculptor Alberto Giacometti were among works missing from the foundation.
OPINION
February 26, 2012 | By James Romm
Greek opinion is divided over the government's plan to offer the Parthenon and other heritage sites as film and photo backdrops to raise revenue during its current economic crisis. "This is sacrilege!" one Greek tour guide protested. But others thought that, humbling though the measure might be, it was at least better than begging for foreign bailouts. For some Greeks, the debate may have evoked a sense of déjà vu. Pericles, the great Athenian statesman, also proposed raiding the Parthenon to meet a shortfall, nearly 2,500 years ago - challenging the boundaries not just of good taste but of religious taboo.
NEWS
March 28, 2014 | By Anne Harnagel
TourCrafters is offering reasonably priced excursions to Greece that combine a stay in Athens with an Aegean cruise that allows you to sample some of the country's popular islands. The "Iconic Aegean" package includes two nights in Athens, with time to take in the Acropolis as well as an evening of dancing and bouzouki music. The four-day cruise makes stops at Mykonos, Patmos and the Monastery of St. John the Theologian, Rhodes and the village of Lindos and the medieval Old Town, Crete and Santorini.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 28, 1991
I must take exception to some of William Wilson's comments about Catherine's excesses. He fails to realize that the history of civilization is a pageant of excesses--some excesses that challenged, pushed and pressed men to produce and achieve some mastery of their talents and artistry. One can look at the renowned buildings of Europe, the cathedrals, the palaces, the Egyptian pyramids, the Sphinx, the Great Wall of China, the Acropolis and marble statues of Greece. Each country has its marvels that repay their costs in excess of their original outlay.
WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Anthee Carassava
ATHENS - Hundreds of Greeks and activists from 19 other European countries took to the streets of Athens on Saturday in protest against a far-right party that critics fear could feed extremism across the continent. The rally against Golden Dawn, viewed by many as one of the more dangerous groups of reactionaries in Europe, comes amid reports of increased vigilantism and attacks on migrants waged by its members and supporters since the party catapulted onto Greece's tumultuous political landscape in June, winning 18 seats in the nation's 300-member parliament.
WORLD
October 11, 2013 | By Tiffany Hsu
ATHENS - Locals called Pittaki Street a "public toilet. " Drug addicts and petty criminals frequented the narrow lane, steps from a popular plaza where tourists exploring Greece angle for shots of the looming Acropolis. The scraggle of remaining residents kept to themselves. Graffiti and broken windows adorned grimy walls. Two dimly illuminating streetlights dangled overhead. "It was a very nasty place where you didn't want to live," Stephania Xydia said as she stood looking down the avenue's 200 feet, dusk spilling over the rooftops.
WORLD
December 15, 2012 | By Anthee Carassava
ATHENS - Hundreds of Greeks and activists from 19 other European countries took to the streets of Athens on Saturday in protest against a far-right party that critics fear could feed extremism across the continent. The rally against Golden Dawn, viewed by many as one of the more dangerous groups of reactionaries in Europe, comes amid reports of increased vigilantism and attacks on migrants waged by its members and supporters since the party catapulted onto Greece's tumultuous political landscape in June, winning 18 seats in the nation's 300-member parliament.
OPINION
February 26, 2012 | By James Romm
Greek opinion is divided over the government's plan to offer the Parthenon and other heritage sites as film and photo backdrops to raise revenue during its current economic crisis. "This is sacrilege!" one Greek tour guide protested. But others thought that, humbling though the measure might be, it was at least better than begging for foreign bailouts. For some Greeks, the debate may have evoked a sense of déjà vu. Pericles, the great Athenian statesman, also proposed raiding the Parthenon to meet a shortfall, nearly 2,500 years ago - challenging the boundaries not just of good taste but of religious taboo.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 24, 2010 | By Suzanne Muchnic
For advocates of the repatriation of marble sculptures removed from the Parthenon in the early 19th century and long housed at the British Museum in London, the new Acropolis Museum is proof -- at last -- that Greece has a safe place to display the hotly contested artworks. For Athenians who live and work near the Acropolis, the looming modern structure at the southeastern base of the hill is a mixed blessing. The $200-million, 226,000-square-foot museum has transformed the area of Makrygianni, boosting property values while dwarfing other buildings in the neighborhood.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2009
Stage set for Acropolis fix Greek authorities say they will partially restore the ruined marble theater under the Acropolis, where the works of Euripides and other classical playwrights were first performed about 2,500 years ago. The Culture Ministry said Wednesday that the $9-million program was set for completion by 2015 and would include extensive modern additions to the surviving marble seats of the Theater of Dionysos. Built on the southern slopes of the Acropolis Hill, the theater was first used in the late 6th century BC. It hosted the opening performances of tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, as well as Aristophanes' comedies.
WORLD
June 21, 2009 | Associated Press
Gods, heroes and long-dead mortals stepped off their plinths into the evening sky of Athens on Saturday during the lavish launch of the new Acropolis Museum, a decades-old dream that Greece hopes also will help reclaim a cherished part of its heritage from Britain. The digitally animated display on the museum walls ended years of delays and wrangling over the ultramodern building, set among apartment blocks and elegant neoclassical houses at the foot of the Acropolis hill.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 18, 2009 | Associated Press
About 1,500 years after Christian zealots vandalized the Parthenon's pagan sculptures, Greece's Orthodox Church on Wednesday formally blessed the new Acropolis Museum, set to open this weekend after years of delays. Standing near the remains of an inaugural sacrifice for a 3rd century BC town house excavated under the citadel, priests burned incense and chanted blessings for the building where Greece hopes one day to display the Elgin -- or Parthenon -- Marbles.
TRAVEL
March 9, 1986 | PHYLLIS WHITE, White is a Venice, Calif., free-lance writer.
Everyone in Europe, including the tourists, complains about the tourists, hordes of them, arriving by plane, train and bus and swarming all over the landscape. Dreadful. But now something is being done about this profitable problem. Greece is inviting those same tourists to visit in the winter and swarm all they want. The country is gearing up for round-the-year visitors, and if you have ever bucked the mobs on the Acropolis in July, you will appreciate the calm delights of uncrowded winter.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 26, 2009
Stage set for Acropolis fix Greek authorities say they will partially restore the ruined marble theater under the Acropolis, where the works of Euripides and other classical playwrights were first performed about 2,500 years ago. The Culture Ministry said Wednesday that the $9-million program was set for completion by 2015 and would include extensive modern additions to the surviving marble seats of the Theater of Dionysos. Built on the southern slopes of the Acropolis Hill, the theater was first used in the late 6th century BC. It hosted the opening performances of tragedies by Aeschylus, Sophocles and Euripides, as well as Aristophanes' comedies.
TRAVEL
March 29, 2009 | Raed Rafei, Associated Press; Reuters News; Australian Associated Press
1 Lebanon After years of instability, Lebanon is getting its groove back. Although the U.S. State Department maintains a travel warning, which advises Americans to avoid Lebanon because of safety and security concerns, a political agreement last year has restored calm. Foreign tourists have been flocking back to the Mideast country's pine-covered mountains, fancy Mediterranean beach clubs and buzzing night life. About 1.3 million visited last year, up 30% from 2007, government officials said.
WORLD
October 15, 2007 | Tracy Wilkinson, Times Staff Writer
For most of her 85 years, Elly Kouremenos has awakened and looked out her window to see a breathtakingly clear picture of the ancient Parthenon, Greece's revered temple atop the Acropolis mountain. It brings joy, she said, "the grandeur of it." "I say, 'Oh my God,' every day," added Kouremenos' equally reverent daughter, Marina. The Kouremenos' apartment building faces the Acropolis and is one of the last and most important examples of early 20th century Art Deco architecture in Athens.
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