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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
The battle to stop the dolphin slaughter made infamous by last year's Oscar-winning documentary, “ The Cove ,” has taken another turn. On Dec. 16, Sea Shepherd volunteer Erwin Vermeulen, a member of the Cove Guardians project to monitor and document the capture of dolphins in Taiji, Japan, was arrested by Japanese police and charged with assault. Vermeulen was arrested by Wakayama Prefecture police after attempting to film the transfer of a dolphin into holding pens at the Dolphin Resort Hotel, one destination for dolphins rounded up in Taiji.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 7, 2014 | By Teresa Watanabe
A citywide coalition of community groups and civil rights leaders unveiled a comprehensive new measure Monday ranking L.A. Unified's neediest schools and urged more targeted spending on students there. The "student need index," which analyzed test scores, dropout rates, gun violence, asthma and eight other factors that affect learning, found that the neediest schools were concentrated in southern and eastern Los Angeles, along with the Pacoima area in the San Fernando Valley. The schools included Fremont and Jordan high schools, Bethune and Drew middle schools and Griffith Joyner and Woodcrest elementary schools.
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WORLD
October 2, 2013 | By Sergei Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- Five Greenpeace activists were charged Wednesday morning with piracy in connection with a protest at a Russian oil platform, an official of the environmental group said. Roman Dolgov of Russia, Sini Saarela of Finland, Anna Paula Maciel of Brazil, Kieron Bryan of Britain and Dima Litvinov, who has U.S. and Swedish citizenship, were charged with organized group piracy in the northern Russian city of Murmansk, according to Vladimir Chuprov, head of Greenpeace Arctic. [Updated, 8:55 a.m. PDT Oct. 2: Later Wednesday, an additional nine protesters were charged with piracy as the preceedings continued into the evening.
NATIONAL
April 7, 2014 | By Richard Simon
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Capitol, home to inspiring statues of Andrew Jackson, Sam Houston, Ronald Reagan. And Lucille Ball? A group seeking to increase the number of women represented in the Capitol's collection of statues includes the red-headed comedian on a list of California women who should be considered for Washington's version of a national hall of fame. Since 1864, each state has been authorized to place statues of two of its distinguished deceased citizens in the Capitol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2012 | By Dean Kuipers
With the U.S. Senate poised to begin debate on a bill that would greenlight the controversial Keystone XL pipeline as early as Tuesday, activists and other citizens have barraged the Senate with more than 350,000 petitions opposing the legislation in less than five hours. Activists Bill McKibben , Robert Redford and other celebs such as Kyra Sedgwick and Ian Somerhalder have joined the Natural Resources Defense Council, 350.org, the Sierra Club and other groups in coordinating the petition effort . The goal is 500,000 messages to the Senate by Tuesday.
NATIONAL
September 22, 2012 | By Matt Pearce
Environmental activists showed off a new form of protest throughout the country and around the world Saturday: a "Global Frackdown. " On Saturday, activists at roughly 100 events around the globe were scheduled to protest a controversial oil and gas extraction practice called hydraulic fracturing or fracking. Organizers dubbed their activities in North America, Europe and Australia a " Global Frackdown. " More than 50 Code Pink members gathered near the Golden Gate Bridge in San Francisco.
WORLD
November 12, 2012 | By Rima Marrouch
Several parts of Syria were engulfed in conflict Monday, including areas that opposition activists said came under airstrike by government forces. Opposition activists said an airstrike in the northern city of Ras Ayn killed a dozen people and injured scores. One activist reached by phone said the attacks hit both civilians and rebels. Thousands of people fled the city last week, putting new pressure on refugee camps in neighboring Turkey, but others remained on the outskirts of town.
NEWS
November 2, 2011 | By Kim Geiger, Washington Bureau
The Occupy Iowa general assembly voted Monday night to invite other Occupy movements from across the country to help in an effort to shut down the Iowa campaign headquarters of presidential candidates until the state's caucus day, Jan. 3. “You go inside or if they won't let you in, you shut 'em down,” Frank Cordaro, an Occupy Iowa protester who came up with the idea, told the Des Moines Register, which first reported the story . “Who knows?...
WORLD
September 26, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been updated. See the note below for details.
MOSCOW -- A Russian court ordered a photographer and five Greenpeace activists to be held under arrest for two months Thursday pending investigation into an attempt to board an oil drilling platform in the Arctic Sea. Prominent Russian photographer Denis Sinyakov, American ship's captain Pete Willcox and Greenpeace spokesman Roman Dolgov were among those ordered held by a court in the northern Russia port of Murmansk. The court had yet to rule on the fate of the other 24 people on board the Greenpeace vessel Arctic Sunrise, though proceedings were continuing late Thursday.
NEWS
June 20, 2013 | By Seema Mehta
SAN JOSE - Avoiding the controversial issue of domestic spying, President Obama told a gathering of liberal activists Thursday that they may not always agree with him, but their shared work on causes such as the overhaul of the nation's healthcare system has made the country better. "I need you to put pressure on members of Congress and make your voices heard just like you've always done," Obama said in a video address Thursday evening to Netroots Nation, a gathering of thousands of liberal activists and bloggers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 6, 2014 | By Gale Holland
It was billed as a guided tour for downtown residents, church and business groups and elected officials to see skid row for themselves. As the group headed out on foot from L.A.'s Midnight Mission, it was confronted by demonstrators whistling, drumming and chanting: "You're not welcome here!" and "You're the problem!" That was in June 2011. A year later, Deborah Burton, a community organizer who was once homeless, was charged with misdemeanor assault and battery on two tour leaders.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By David Zahniser and Laura J. Nelson
A plan for increasing the sales tax to fix Los Angeles' broken streets is on a collision course with a similar levy being pushed for regional transit projects. Two weeks ago, the top budget advisor to the Los Angeles City Council said a tax increase is the only way thousands of miles of severely damaged roads and sidewalks will get repaired. A half-cent increase in the sales tax, which would generate $4.5 billion over 15 years, should appear on the November ballot, City Administrative Officer Miguel Santana said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 31, 2014 | By Scott Gold
Community activists pledged Monday to continue fighting the construction of an immigrant processing center on the Central Coast, despite a bitterly contested vote in which a local city council advanced the project in the face of fervent public opposition. "The fight is not over," said Hazel Davalos, head of the Santa Maria chapter of Coastal Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy, an organization that helps working families in the region. The federal government wants to replace an aging, dilapidated facility in Lompoc - a smattering of trailers that were installed on the grounds of a prison to process immigration cases.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 28, 2014 | By Howard Blume
David Koff, a filmmaker and union activist whose investigation of a campus construction project profoundly changed the Los Angeles school system, has died. He was 74. He committed suicide March 6 in Hastings, N.Y., his family said. Koff was the indefatigable researcher who, in the 1990s, took on the Belmont Learning Complex, turning it into a symbol of civic dysfunction as it became the nation's most expensive high school. Outside Los Angeles, Koff was best known as a talented documentary filmmaker who took uncompromising stands.
WORLD
March 27, 2014 | By Robyn Dixon
CAPE TOWN, South Africa - When South African airport officials threatened to send Dr. Paul Semugoma back to his native Uganda, he shook with fear. Semugoma, an outspoken gay activist, was determined to remain in this country, where he has lived for two years, rather than be sent back to one of Africa's most homophobic countries. Held by immigration officers after returning to South Africa with an expired visa, he was allowed to stay only after an outcry from human rights groups mindful of new legislation in Uganda calling for life in prison for those who engage in repeated acts of gay sex. The harshness of the law signed days later by Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni - and similar strictures in more than three dozen African nations - is triggering a profound reaction in Africa.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 2014 | Times Staff and Wire Reports
Jonathan Schell, the author, journalist and activist who wrote passionately and cogently about war and politics for more than 40 years, condemning conflicts from Vietnam to Iraq and galvanizing the anti-nuclear movement with his horrifyingly detailed bestseller, "The Fate of the Earth," died Tuesday at his home in New York City. He was 70. The cause was cancer, according to Schell's companion, Irena Gross. With unrelenting rage and idealism, Schell focused on the consequences of violence in essays and books that conveyed a hatred of war rooted in part in his firsthand observations of American military operations in Vietnam.
WORLD
December 22, 2013 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO -- An Egyptian court Sunday sentenced three prominent activists to three-year prison terms and heavy fines, state media reported, in what was seen by rights advocates as a worrying sign of the military-backed government's determination to suppress political dissent. The three -- Ahmed Maher, Mohamed Adel and Ahmed Douma -- are best known for leading roles in the 2011 uprising that toppled autocratic President Hosni Mubarak as protests blazed across the Arab world. The unexpectedly harsh sentences provoked dismay among rights advocates, who have been feeling increasingly under siege at the hands of the interim government, despite its promises to return the country to democracy.
WORLD
December 24, 2013 | By Sergei L. Loiko, This post has been corrected. See the note below for details
MOSCOW -- Investigators began closing criminal cases against 28 Greenpeace activists and two freelance journalists Tuesday as part of an amnesty viewed by many as an effort by President Vladimir Putin to polish Russia's image before hosting the Olympic Winter Games. “We have information that all 30 cases are being closed down, but not all the papers have been officially signed and stamped yet,” Greenpeace Arctic program coordinator Vladimir Chuprov said in an interview. On Friday, tycoon Mikhail Khodorkovsky, once considered Putin's most potent political foe, was freed after 10 years in prison.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 2014 | By Gale Holland
A federal civil rights lawsuit filed Monday accuses the city of Los Angeles of malicious prosecution for charging a skid row community organizer with assault after she blew an air horn during a demonstration. City Atty. Carmen Trutanich charged Deborah Burton, 62, with misdemeanor assault and battery for allegedly blowing the horn in officials' ears during a 2011 skid row protest. Burton was acquitted of all charges last July. The suit says the charges were aimed at stifling political dissent.
WORLD
March 10, 2014 | By Laura King and Amro Hassan
CAIRO - Three veteran activists of Egypt's 2011 revolution told a court Monday that they were suffering abuse at the hands of their jailers and that they were even beaten up by the prison guards bringing them to court. The allegations by the well-known figures highlighted the worsening plight of detainees in Egypt's jam-packed prisons. Thousands of people have been imprisoned since July, when the military-backed interim government took over, and human rights groups have cited a deluge of what they describe as credible accounts of maltreatment.
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