Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsActon Ca Development And Redevelopment
IN THE NEWS

Acton Ca Development And Redevelopment

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1991
The former president of the Acton Town Council was fined and ordered to perform community service Friday for allegedly helping remove hundreds of real estate signs as an anti-development protest. The judge postponed sentencing of a current council member. Joel Levy, 54, the council's president since 1989, was fined $1,175, ordered to perform 50 days of community service, pay restitution up to $800, and placed on three years probation.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional planners on Wednesday denied Albertson's a permit to sell liquor at a proposed supermarket in Acton after residents vehemently protested that the store--the first major modern convenience in the community--would destroy the rural ambience. More than 75 residents at a special hearing in Santa Clarita cheered the 4-0 vote following three hours of testimony, mostly in opposition to Albertson's plan to build a 40,000-square-foot supermarket.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1988
The residents of rural Acton, long accustomed to reining in horses, have decided it's time to lasso a few developers. By a unanimous show of hands at a town meeting, more than 100 residents voted to lobby the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to enact strict growth and design ordinances in the town 46 miles north of Los Angeles.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1994
In a surprise move, Ralphs Grocery Co. has canceled its controversial plans to build a 40,000-square-foot store in Acton, county officials said. Ralphs officials said they would not comment until next week on the reason for their decision. The announcement came the day before a hearing was scheduled on the proposal.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Members of the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission unanimously approved a 75-house development near Acton on Thursday, saying their past concerns about the project's effect on the rural surroundings had been addressed. The houses will be spaced out over 160 acres, most of them on lots of one to 11 acres so that they blend in better with the area's country character. Developer DKY Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1988 | TRACEY KAPLAN, Times Staff Writer
When Steve Miller grew up in Torrance, his family kept horses in the back yard. That was in the early 1950s, before apartments ate up the open space and the city banned livestock in most residential neighborhoods. As a young adult, Miller fled to Chatsworth, where he could ride his horses--even down Topanga Canyon Boulevard. Then in the mid-1970s, when the developers moved in, Miller moved out.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Citizen Brink. A heavyset bulldog of a man, Charles Brink returned three years ago to his hometown of Acton, formerly a rough-and-tumble mining community set in a steamy mountainous bowl between the Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys. Since then, Brink, 51, has fought with developers and has gotten himself arrested for allegedly stealing real estate signs. He was accused by rivals of swiping ballots for the Town Council election, though the accusations never led to criminal charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 2001 | MARTHA L. WILLMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Regional planners on Wednesday denied Albertson's a permit to sell liquor at a proposed supermarket in Acton after residents vehemently protested that the store--the first major modern convenience in the community--would destroy the rural ambience. More than 75 residents at a special hearing in Santa Clarita cheered the 4-0 vote following three hours of testimony, mostly in opposition to Albertson's plan to build a 40,000-square-foot supermarket.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rejecting the pleas of prosecutors who argued that an Acton community activist should serve at least one day in jail for illegally removing hundreds of real estate signs, a judge sentenced the activist to 100 days of community service Friday. Lancaster Superior Court Judge Charles Peven also placed Charles Brink, 51, on three years probation, fined him $2,700 and ordered him to pay restitution for the signs he removed. Deputy Dist. Atty. Pamela C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The two slow-growth activists from Acton who allegedly tore down several hundred real estate sales signs each pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor vandalism charge Wednesday in Lancaster Superior Court in an eleventh-hour plea agreement. Charles Brink, 51, and Joel Levy, 54, who were members of the unincorporated community's Town Council when they destroyed the signs, entered their pleas before Superior Court Judge Charles Peven just after a jury had been selected to hear the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994 | TERESA ANN WILLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because of insufficient public notice, the County Board of Supervisors on Thursday was forced to schedule a second hearing on a plan to grant a liquor license to a proposed Ralphs grocery store in Acton. Dave Vannatta, planning deputy for Supervisor Mike Antonovich, estimated that approximately half of the residents living within 500 feet of where the supermarket is to be built were not notified of the hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The market may not be ready for the market. Recently voiced fears of crime and traffic by residents have forced a major supermarket chain to re-evaluate its decision to locate in rural Acton, a move that was endorsed three years ago by the Acton Town Council. "We'd like to go to communities where people look forward to us serving them," Byron Allumbaugh, chairman and CEO of Ralphs Grocery Co., said through a spokesperson. "As you know, there is some opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 17, 1992 | AMY PYLE
Members of the Los Angeles County Regional Planning Commission unanimously approved a 75-house development near Acton on Thursday, saying their past concerns about the project's effect on the rural surroundings had been addressed. The houses will be spaced out over 160 acres, most of them on lots of one to 11 acres so that they blend in better with the area's country character. Developer DKY Co.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 14, 1991 | BLAINE HALLEY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Rejecting the pleas of prosecutors who argued that an Acton community activist should serve at least one day in jail for illegally removing hundreds of real estate signs, a judge sentenced the activist to 100 days of community service Friday. Lancaster Superior Court Judge Charles Peven also placed Charles Brink, 51, on three years probation, fined him $2,700 and ordered him to pay restitution for the signs he removed. Deputy Dist. Atty. Pamela C.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 16, 1991
The former president of the Acton Town Council was fined and ordered to perform community service Friday for allegedly helping remove hundreds of real estate signs as an anti-development protest. The judge postponed sentencing of a current council member. Joel Levy, 54, the council's president since 1989, was fined $1,175, ordered to perform 50 days of community service, pay restitution up to $800, and placed on three years probation.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 3, 1991 | JIM HERRON ZAMORA and JOHN CHANDLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The two slow-growth activists from Acton who allegedly tore down several hundred real estate sales signs each pleaded no contest to one misdemeanor vandalism charge Wednesday in Lancaster Superior Court in an eleventh-hour plea agreement. Charles Brink, 51, and Joel Levy, 54, who were members of the unincorporated community's Town Council when they destroyed the signs, entered their pleas before Superior Court Judge Charles Peven just after a jury had been selected to hear the case.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 12, 1993 | JEFF SCHNAUFER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The market may not be ready for the market. Recently voiced fears of crime and traffic by residents have forced a major supermarket chain to re-evaluate its decision to locate in rural Acton, a move that was endorsed three years ago by the Acton Town Council. "We'd like to go to communities where people look forward to us serving them," Byron Allumbaugh, chairman and CEO of Ralphs Grocery Co., said through a spokesperson. "As you know, there is some opposition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 14, 1994 | TERESA ANN WILLIS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Because of insufficient public notice, the County Board of Supervisors on Thursday was forced to schedule a second hearing on a plan to grant a liquor license to a proposed Ralphs grocery store in Acton. Dave Vannatta, planning deputy for Supervisor Mike Antonovich, estimated that approximately half of the residents living within 500 feet of where the supermarket is to be built were not notified of the hearing.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 7, 1991 | JOHN JOHNSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Meet Citizen Brink. A heavyset bulldog of a man, Charles Brink returned three years ago to his hometown of Acton, formerly a rough-and-tumble mining community set in a steamy mountainous bowl between the Antelope and Santa Clarita valleys. Since then, Brink, 51, has fought with developers and has gotten himself arrested for allegedly stealing real estate signs. He was accused by rivals of swiping ballots for the Town Council election, though the accusations never led to criminal charges.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 13, 1988
The residents of rural Acton, long accustomed to reining in horses, have decided it's time to lasso a few developers. By a unanimous show of hands at a town meeting, more than 100 residents voted to lobby the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors to enact strict growth and design ordinances in the town 46 miles north of Los Angeles.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|