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June 10, 2012 | By David Ng
The lead actor categories at the Tony Awards saw a pair of upsets, with James Corden of "One Man, Two Guvnors" and Steve Kazee of "Once" taking home the prizes. Corden won for lead actor in a play for the British comedy import "One Man, Two Guvnors," beating out Philip Seymour Hoffman for "Death of a Salesman. " Hoffman had been considered by many industry watchers as the favorite to win for his portrayal of Willy Loman in the revival of the Arthur Miller classic. Critics have praised Corden's comic performance in the play, which is by Richard Bean.
December 3, 2012
As the director of "Argo," Ben Affleck knew who he wanted in the starring role as CIA agent Tony Mendez: himself. "I was just greedy for this part in this movie," Affleck said at The Envelope Screening Series. What's more, he joked, the director and the actor "were sleeping together, so I talked myself into it. " Affleck was able to cast an array of established actors (Bryan Cranston, John Goodman, Alan Arkin) in prominent roles and a variety of up-and-comers (Clea Duvall, Rory Cochrane)
October 9, 2012 | By Houston Mitchell
  Former Detroit Lions All-Pro and actor Alex Karras has been given only a few days to live because of kidney failure. “The entire Detroit Lions family is deeply saddened to learn of the news regarding the condition of one of our all-time greats, Alex Karras,” Lions President Tom Lewand said. “Perhaps no player in Lions history attained as much success and notoriety for what he did after his playing days as did Alex. The 77-year-old Karras has been suffering from dementia . He is among the many former NFL players suing the league regarding the treatment of head injuries . Detroit drafted him 10th overall out of Iowa in 1958 and he was a standout for 12 seasons.
September 14, 2012 | By Susan King, Los Angeles Times
Not only was Henry Darrow the first Puerto Rican star of an hour-long TV series, playing the charismatic and devilish Manolito Montoya on the 1967-71 NBC western "The High Chaparral," he also was among the first to become a teen dream whose handsome visage adorned the pages of 16 and Tiger Beat magazines. "I appealed to the more mature 12- to 14-year-olds," Darrow said with a laugh over the phone from the home he shares with his second wife, Lauren Levian, in Wilmington, N.C. He added that his costar, Mark Slade, who played the brooding Blue on the sagebrush saga, "appealed to the 9- to 11-year-olds.
March 12, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
While Jefferson Mays was performing in "A Gentleman's Guide to Love and Murder" in the fall of 2012 at Hartford Stage, he recalls, his wife kept overhearing variations on the same remark at intermission: "Isn't it wonderful how they got actors who all look the same to play the different members of the D'Ysquith family?" "It made me very happy and really depressed, simultaneously," says Mays, who was in fact the only actor cast to play all nine D'Ysquiths (DIE-squiths), aristocrats in line for a dukedom who get inventively bumped off one by one by an ambitious relative.
November 2, 2013 | By John Horn
It's not as if Ender Wiggin has all that much riding on his shoulders. He just must single-handedly save the planet in a war against aliens and then become a moral compass for mankind. All before he's old enough to have a beer. Orson Scott Card's futuristic novel "Ender's Game" demands a lot of its central character, which presented filmmaker Gavin Hood with a vast challenge when casting his lead in his big-screen adaptation of the book, opening in theaters this weekend. "He had to be young enough to be a boy at the start of the story and old enough at the end of the story to become a man," Hood said of his ideal Ender.
January 10, 2013
Ned Wertimer, 89, an actor who played Ralph the doorman on all 11 seasons of the CBS sitcom "The Jeffersons," died Jan. 2 at a Valley Village nursing home of complications from a fall at his Burbank home in November, said his manager, Brad Lemack. Wertimer had dozens of guest-starring roles on TV series from the early 1960s through the late 1980s, including "McMillan and Wife," "The Mary Tyler Moore Show" and "I Dream of Jeannie. " But he was best known as Ralph Hart, the uniformed, mustachioed doorman at the luxury apartment building on "The Jeffersons," the "All In the Family" spinoff that ran from 1975 to 1985.
September 3, 2012 | By Dennis McLellan, Los Angeles Times
Michael Clarke Duncan, the tall and massively built actor with the shaved head and deep voice who received an Academy Award nomination for his moving portrayal of a gentle death row inmate in the 1999 prison drama "The Green Mile," died Monday. He was 54. Duncan died at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center, according to a statement from his publicist, Joy Fehily. He had suffered a heart attack in July and did not recover. A former ditch digger for a natural gas company in his native Chicago, Duncan began his Hollywood saga as a celebrity bodyguard in the mid-1990s.
January 22, 2013
Robert F. Chew Baltimore-based actor on 'The Wire' Robert F. Chew, 52, an actor and teacher who portrayed the drug kingpin Proposition Joe on the HBO series "The Wire," died Thursday of apparent heart failure in his sleep at his Baltimore home, according to his sister Clarice Chew. Chew, who also appeared on television in "Homicide: Life on the Street" and "The Corner," taught and mentored child and young-adult actors at Baltimore's Arena Players, a troupe he stayed with as his TV career blossomed through his work with "Wire" creator David Simon.
August 15, 2012
Ron Palillo Actor played Arnold Horshack on 'Kotter' Ron Palillo, 63, an actor whose signature role was Arnold Horshack in the 1970s TV sitcom "Welcome Back, Kotter," died Tuesday of a heart attack in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla., said his agent, Jackie Stander. Along with John Travolta's Vinnie Barbarino, Robert Hegyes' Juan Epstein and Lawrence Hilton-Jacobs' Freddie "Boom Boom" Washington, Palillo's Horshack was one of the original Sweathogs in the James Buchanan High School class taught by Gabe Kaplan's Mr. Kotter.
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