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ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Susan King
Bob Balaban was born, so to speak, into movie royalty. His father and uncles were founders of the Balaban and Katz theater chain of Chicago movie palaces. His uncle Barney Balaban was president of Paramount for three decades, and grandfather Sam Katz was an MGM executive. As a "little nerdy Jewish kid in Chicago," Balaban loved the movies and theater but had no inkling he would be involved in show business. "I was trying to do well in school and hoping I would survive adolescence," said Balaban, currently appearing in George Clooney's World War II adventure "The Monuments Men," which opens Feb. 7. But then he broke his arm at age 10.  "My parents could think of nothing for me to do in the summer, so we got on a train to Los Angeles," said Balaban, 68, by phone from New York, where he lives.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014
Louise Brough Clapp Top-ranked tennis player of the 1940s, '50s Louise Brough Clapp, 90, a former top-ranked tennis player who learned the game on Beverly Hills' Roxbury Park courts and went on to win 35 major tournament titles in the 1940s and '50s, died Monday at her home in Vista after a brief illness. The International Tennis Hall of Fame announced her death. Born Althea Louise Brough on March 11, 1923, in Oklahoma City, she moved to Beverly Hills as a child. By her early teens she was competing in junior tennis tournaments and became national champion in the 18-and-under category in 1940 and '41. A dominant serve-and-volley player, she had a remarkable run at Wimbledon, winning the women's singles title in 1948, '49, '50 and '55. She also competed in women's doubles and mixed doubles and appeared in 21 of the 30 finals played at the All England Club from 1946 through 1955 in the three categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Chris Barton
Looking back from the fragmented media landscape of 2014, it's hard to imagine someone like John Lurie was ever possible. An immediately recognizable character actor who appeared in landmark indie films including Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and "Stranger Than Paradise," Lurie was also a brilliant saxophonist who helped push the boundaries of jazz in the '80s and '90s with his band, the Lounge Lizards. But Lurie was forced to give up music and acting after being stricken with advanced Lyme disease and has since switched to painting (his work has been exhibited numerous times and was collected in a 2007 book, "A Fine Example of Art")
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 4, 2014 | By David Colker
As far back as 1968, rising star Christopher Jones - who seemed to have everything at 26, including sensitive good looks, adoring fans and a steady stream of film offers - said he wasn't much devoted to acting. "I think of acting as only a means to an end," Jones, who was often compared to James Dean, said in a Los Angeles Times interview. "Acting's just my work. " Later that year Jones starred in the youth rebellion film "Wild in the Streets" and had a major role as a British officer in David Lean's 1970 epic "Ryan's Daughter.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Jessica Gelt
The death of Philip Seymour Hoffman on Sunday marked the abrupt end to an acclaimed career, but for audiences there will be much more of his performances to savor. The prolific actor had recently shot a wide variety of work that will be seen at numerous intervals between now and at least November 2015, when the fourth and final film in the "Hunger Games" series is set to hit theaters. The actor played chief gamemaker Plutarch Heavensbee in the recent Lionsgate blockbuster "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" as a man with complicated loyalties who stages the titular competition.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 2, 2014 | By Chris Lee
Academy Award winner Philip Seymour Hoffman, one of the most acclaimed character actors and ambitious performers of his generation, was found dead of an apparent drug overdose inside his New York apartment on Sunday, police said. He was 46. A business associate discovered Hoffman in his bathroom with a needle stuck in his left forearm at about 11:30 a.m. Eastern Standard Time, police said. Two glassine envelopes containing what was thought to be heroin were near his body, and five empty envelopes were found in the trash, police said.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 2, 2014 | By Jessica Gelt and Steven Zeitchik
When Philip Seymour Hoffman died Sunday, he left behind not just a rich body of work but a number of recently completed or in-progress productions, including the final two "Hunger Games" films. The prospects for that latter franchise has proved to be one of the big questions about the late actor's posthumous screen appearances; while Hoffman had completed shooting the first of those films, "Mockingjay: Part 1," the second film still had shooting days remaining for Hoffman. The actor played chief Gamesmaker Plutarch Heavensbee in the smash YA hit, appearing in the recent blockbuster "The Hunger Games: Catching Fire" as a man with complicated loyalties who stages the titular competition.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By David Colker
Austrian actor Maximilian Schell, 83, whose portrayal of a defense attorney in the 1961 drama "Judgment at Nuremberg" earned him an Academy Award, died Friday in a hospital in Innsbruck, according to his agent Patricia Baumbauer.  Schell had been having lung problems, which led to him being admitted to the hospital, said Baumbauer, reached outside Munich, Germany. Schell's wife, Iva, was with him when he died. He was a prolific actor who was Oscar-nominated for two other roles -- in "Julia" (1977)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 1, 2014 | By David Colker
When Austrian-born actor Maximilian Schell won the best actor Academy Award in 1962 for his role in "Judgment at Nuremberg," he gave a short thank-you speech in which he recalled being questioned by a customs official upon first arriving in the United States. "He was asking me what I was doing here, and I said, 'I'm going to do a film,'" Schell told the glittering crowd in his accented English. "And he said to me, 'Good luck, boy.' And I think that was very unusual for a customs man. And I can tell him now that I had it. " Undoubtedly, Schell, whose family fled the Nazis when he was a boy, made his own luck - not only as a celebrated actor who amassed more than 100 film and TV credits, but also as a director of films, documentaries, plays and opera.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 1, 2014 | By Nardine Saad
Owen Wilson has a new little intern to keep track of: The actor now has a second child. Wilson, 45, and Caroline Lindqvist, welcomed their new baby boy on Thursday, his rep told People.  "I can confirm they had a baby boy on Thursday morning," the "Cars 2" actor's rep said in a statement. PHOTOS: The Hollywood baby boom The floppy-haired actor, whose next projects include "A Night At the Museum 3" and the crime drama "Inherent Vice," is already father to Ford, 2, his son with ex-girlfriend Jane Duell.
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