Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsActor
IN THE NEWS

Actor

ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Randee Dawn
Pinning down the "best" scene of any Oscar-nominated performance is something of a Stygian nightmare for producers because - as they correctly protest - if an actor or actress has been nominated, they have far more than one great scene. But when ballots are being ticked off by academy voters later this month, most of them will have a single, crystallizing, moment held in their memory that helps them choose one performance over another. Here, then, are 10 of those great, possibly award-winning, moments: Christian Bale / "American Hustle" The setup: To avoid jail time, two low-level con artists are enlisted by an FBI agent to teach them how the business works … but the agent may be the one who ends up getting conned.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By Amy Kaufman
Colin Farrell wanted a cigarette, but he didn't have one on him. He was sitting poolside at the Roosevelt Hotel, which seemed like the kind of place where one smokes. So he asked a pretty hostess if she had a pack; she did not. "You want a cigarette?" asked an interloper standing nearby who had overheard the exchange. "I'm going to get you one right now. " A few minutes later, the stranger returned, cigarette in hand. He asked Farrell what movies the actor had coming up, adding that he was producing a few. PHOTOS: Behind the scenes of movies and TV "Good luck with it. Good luck with it, brother," Farrell replied.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 13, 2014 | By David C. Nichols
“Fifteen years ago I killed my sister.” That stark, matter-of-fact statement launches “Nocturne,” and its embedded significance is inexorable and intense. Adam Rapp's hypnotic, intricately written elegy for the fallout from an unimaginable family tragedy receives a resolute production, in which noted Belgian actor George Regout makes an impressive North American stage debut as a 32-year-old former piano prodigy struggling to transcend the event that decimated his family and upended his life.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 13, 2014 | Times staff and wire reports
Ralph Waite, an actor who played the patriarch of a Depression-era Virginia family on the classic television series "The Waltons," has died. He was 85. Waite, a Palm Desert resident, died Thursday, his manager, Alan Mills, told the Associated Press. The cause was not immediately determined, Mills said. Waite had been in good health and appeared last year in episodes of the series "NCIS," "Bones" and "Days of Our Lives. " "The Waltons," which aired on CBS from 1972 to 1981, starred Waite as John Walton; Richard Thomas played his oldest son, John-Boy, an aspiring novelist.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Deborah Vankin
Shia LaBeouf is at a loss for words - today, anyway. Inside the inner sanctum of Los Angeles' Cohen Gallery - a bare, echo-y room within a room, no bigger than a walk-in closet - LaBeouf sits silent and erect at a plain, plywood table. He wears a black tuxedo jacket and a rumpled paper bag with eyehole cutouts over his head. Scrawled across the bag: "I Am Not Famous Anymore. " It's the same outfit he wore on the red carpet Sunday at the Berlin premiere of his newest film, Lars von Trier's "Nymphomaniac: Volume I. " Now, like a man in an interrogation room, LaBeouf sits facing forward, his palms flat on the tabletop on either side of him. He makes direct eye contact through the slits in the bag, which appear stained around the eyes, as if from tears.  PHOTOS: Art by Banksy The former Disney star braved a storm of allegations in December when he used uncredited work by graphic novelist Daniel Clowes in his short film, "HowardCantour.com," which premiered at the Cannes Film Festival in May 2012.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 12, 2014 | By Steven Zeitchik and Amy Kaufman
By singing and dancing into the hearts of Depression-era America, Shirley Temple opened the door for hundreds of childhood performers to follow. Yet the realm of stardom in which those young stars now find themselves couldn't be more different than the world Temple helped create. Shirley Temple Black, who died Monday at age 85, performed in dozens of movies before she even hit her teens. For several years in the 1930s she was a bigger box-office draw than any adult star of the period, a group that included Vivien Leigh and Greta Garbo, as the studio both pushed Temple to crank out movies and protected her from the scrutiny that came with it.  PHOTOS: Shirley Temple Black, 1928-2014 It is Temple's legacy that, directly or otherwise, made possible the emergence of a wide group of modern-era youthful entertainers, including Jodie Foster, Justin Bieber, Gary Coleman and Miley Cyrus, to name just a few. It is also a culture that has mutated significantly in Temple's wake - and not always for the best.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 10, 2014 | By Oliver Gettell
Everyone's a winner - or at least no one is yet a loser -  at the annual Academy Awards nominee luncheon, where a glitzy crowd of actors, directors and behind-the-scenes creative types rub elbows and offer a few choice sound bites before the final stretch of the Oscar race. At Monday's event, a procession of big-name nominees spoke to assembled reporters about making their movies, picking their outfits, surviving awards season and more. Here are some highlights. "Dallas Buyers Club" actor  Matthew McConaughey , on how he'll celebrate if he wins: "I'm going to celebrate no matter what.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 7, 2014 | By Susan King
Bob Balaban was born, so to speak, into movie royalty. His father and uncles were founders of the Balaban and Katz theater chain of Chicago movie palaces. His uncle Barney Balaban was president of Paramount for three decades, and grandfather Sam Katz was an MGM executive. As a "little nerdy Jewish kid in Chicago," Balaban loved the movies and theater but had no inkling he would be involved in show business. "I was trying to do well in school and hoping I would survive adolescence," said Balaban, currently appearing in George Clooney's World War II adventure "The Monuments Men," which opens Feb. 7. But then he broke his arm at age 10.  "My parents could think of nothing for me to do in the summer, so we got on a train to Los Angeles," said Balaban, 68, by phone from New York, where he lives.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 5, 2014
Louise Brough Clapp Top-ranked tennis player of the 1940s, '50s Louise Brough Clapp, 90, a former top-ranked tennis player who learned the game on Beverly Hills' Roxbury Park courts and went on to win 35 major tournament titles in the 1940s and '50s, died Monday at her home in Vista after a brief illness. The International Tennis Hall of Fame announced her death. Born Althea Louise Brough on March 11, 1923, in Oklahoma City, she moved to Beverly Hills as a child. By her early teens she was competing in junior tennis tournaments and became national champion in the 18-and-under category in 1940 and '41. A dominant serve-and-volley player, she had a remarkable run at Wimbledon, winning the women's singles title in 1948, '49, '50 and '55. She also competed in women's doubles and mixed doubles and appeared in 21 of the 30 finals played at the All England Club from 1946 through 1955 in the three categories.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 4, 2014 | By Chris Barton
Looking back from the fragmented media landscape of 2014, it's hard to imagine someone like John Lurie was ever possible. An immediately recognizable character actor who appeared in landmark indie films including Jim Jarmusch's "Down by Law" and "Stranger Than Paradise," Lurie was also a brilliant saxophonist who helped push the boundaries of jazz in the '80s and '90s with his band, the Lounge Lizards. But Lurie was forced to give up music and acting after being stricken with advanced Lyme disease and has since switched to painting (his work has been exhibited numerous times and was collected in a 2007 book, "A Fine Example of Art")
Los Angeles Times Articles
|