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NEWS
July 3, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiations for a new TV and film contract dragged on Monday as actors and studios found a final agreement on money issues elusive. Actors, represented by the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, had been widely expected to have a deal completed with studios by the weekend, when the existing contract expired. But the pace of talks bogged down over the last two days. Still, sources on both sides say they expect to settle soon.
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BUSINESS
April 18, 2009 | Richard Verrier
For Hollywood actors, the third act was anticlimactic. After a year of warring with studios, another union and even among themselves, Hollywood's actors finally reached an accord Friday for a new labor contract, signaling an end to a costly drama that roiled the entertainment industry just as it tumbled into the worst economic downturn in decades.
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ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 1991 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Even as Warner Bros. Pictures is casting new villains for "Batman II," the original blockbuster is still wallowing in red ink--thanks in large part to the Caped Crusader's archenemy, the Joker. The fifth-highest grossing motion picture in history and the No. 1 box-office hit of all time for Warners is still $35.8 million in the red and not likely to ever show a profit, according to financial statements obtained by The Times.
BUSINESS
February 20, 2009 | Richard Verrier
Negotiations between actors and the Hollywood studios broke down Thursday night, dashing high hopes for a quick resolution in a stalemate that has kept the union's 120,000 members working without a new contract for seven months. The Screen Actors Guild and the Alliance of Motion Picture and Television Producers, which negotiates on behalf of the studios, ended talks after just three days. No further talks are scheduled.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 2, 1992 | DENNIS McDOUGAL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The announcement last week that the possibility of a Hollywood work stoppage had been averted with tentative agreement between producers and actors on a new three-year contract may have been premature, at least as far as television is concerned. A strike involving the three major TV networks and about 120,000 members of both the American Federation of Television & Radio Artists and the Screen Actors Guild could still happen.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 27, 1993
The 11-year-old star of the "Problem Child" movies unjustly forced Universal Pictures to renegotiate his contract, a jury ruled Monday, and the young actor may have to return $170,000 to the studio. The Superior Court jury found that a signed agreement between Michael Oliver and Universal was unenforceable as it was signed under duress by the entertainment giant.
BUSINESS
May 14, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Intermission in Hollywood's spring labor drama ends Tuesday afternoon when actors sit down to negotiate a new TV and movie contract with the major studios. Just a few weeks ago, a strike by both writers and actors seemed all but inevitable. But now few are betting that the Screen Actors Guild and its smaller sister union, the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, will walk out--especially after the Writers Guild of America settled with the industry this month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 24, 1992 | ROBERT W. WELKOS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The threat of a crippling production shutdown at Hollywood's movie studios was averted Sunday when negotiators reached a tentative agreement on a new three-year contract covering actors and extras. Although terms were not disclosed, the agreement means that the Screen Actors Guild will become the bargaining agent for union extras on the West Coast for the first time since 1946, when the extras broke away and formed their own union.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2001 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors who perform in television programs such as soap operas, game shows, unscripted programs and variety shows have agreed to a new three-year contract with major TV networks and producers. Representatives of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists released no details in announcing the settlement, which was reached late Friday night. The contract expired at midnight Thursday, but the two sides continued to negotiate until they reached an agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 12, 1995 | STEVE WEINSTEIN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It's pretty simple: If you have anything to do with "Friends," NBC's second-year sitcom about six neurotic, pretty pals moaning and loafing around their communal apartment, Hollywood wants you bad--so bad that you're going to need to rent an armored truck to haul away all the cash that the town seems eager to throw your way.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
NEW YORK -- Although the deadline has passed, negotiations on a new contract between the actors' union and Broadway theater producers are continuing, both sides said Monday. The contract between Actors' Equity Assn. and the Broadway League, which represents both producers and theater owners, expired at midnight Sunday.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 10, 2008 | John Horn and Matea Gold, Times Staff Writers
The Writers Guild of America leadership recommended Saturday that striking writers approve a contract offer from television networks and movie studios, signaling a likely -- but not immediate -- resolution to the crippling labor impasse. The tentative pact -- which guild members greeted enthusiastically but hardly exuberantly -- still requires a ratification vote to end the 14-week strike.
BUSINESS
November 19, 2001 | JAMES BATES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Actors who perform in television programs such as soap operas, game shows, unscripted programs and variety shows have agreed to a new three-year contract with major TV networks and producers. Representatives of the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists released no details in announcing the settlement, which was reached late Friday night. The contract expired at midnight Thursday, but the two sides continued to negotiate until they reached an agreement.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 3, 2001 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Many have no doubt long suspected this, but actors--along with their agents and attorneys--are apparently delivered a special kind of newspaper that comes without a front page or business section. Indeed, in an age when so-called reality television has spread across prime time like a California brush fire, one might think that Hollywood's talent and their representatives would be ready for their own reality check, recognizing that the U.S.
BUSINESS
August 11, 2001 | James Bates
As expected, members of the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists voted overwhelmingly to approve a new three-year deal negotiated in July with major studios. The unions said 96.7% of the 38,163 members voting approved the deal, with 3.2% voting no and 0.1% of the ballots invalid.
BUSINESS
July 5, 2001
Actors and studio executives, both lacking the stomach for a strike, breathed a collective sigh of relief Wednesday after negotiators for actors' unions and movie and TV producers reached tentative agreement on a new three-year contract. Actors particularly were gratified that they will be getting more money for shows rerun on cable TV. They also were pleased that Fox Broadcasting Co.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 13, 1990 | STEVE WEINSTEIN
CBS has moved back by one week the date that it plans to air a TV movie based on the Charles Stuart murder-suicide case, but the move most likely will not circumvent the scheduling conflict that prompted MGM/UA to sue the network last week in an effort to block the broadcast. Whether the suit continues is now in ABC's hands.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 17, 1996 | BRIAN LOWRY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Faced with a threatened holdout by the "Friends" cast, the show's production company broke its silence Tuesday by saying it is working to resolve the matter. "We are reviewing the 'Friends' cast members' request to renegotiate, with the expectation it will be amicably and successfully resolved," Warner Bros. Television said in a statement. Because NBC airs the series, and does not produce it, the actors' deals are with the studio.
NEWS
July 4, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER and MEG JAMES, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiators for studios and 135,000 actors agreed late Tuesday on a new film and TV contract, ending one of Hollywood's longest and most tense periods of labor unrest. The tentative three-year deal, coming two months after writers settled their contentious negotiations, ends any threat of a devastating strike this summer. It also caps an extraordinary turnaround in Hollywood's labor fortunes.
NEWS
July 3, 2001 | JAMES BATES and CLAUDIA ELLER, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
Negotiations for a new TV and film contract dragged on Monday as actors and studios found a final agreement on money issues elusive. Actors, represented by the Screen Actors Guild and the American Federation of Television and Radio Artists, had been widely expected to have a deal completed with studios by the weekend, when the existing contract expired. But the pace of talks bogged down over the last two days. Still, sources on both sides say they expect to settle soon.
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