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ENTERTAINMENT
February 21, 1986 | KEVIN THOMAS, Times Staff Writer
"Spring Bell" (Friday at the Kokusai) is a traditional woman's picture with a contemporary sensibility. What's old fashioned is its slow pace, the emphasis on its leading lady's elegant wardrobe and its extensive travelogue-like footage of the beautiful ancient capital of Nara. What's new is writer Koji Takada's portrait of a husband (Kinya Kitaoji) who at last considers forgiving his wife (Yoshiko Mita) for her infidelity, a fairly radical notion in Japanese movies.
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NEWS
June 29, 1995 | TODD EVERETT, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Yes, it's another in the Moorpark Melodrama's current series of favorite showsfrom past seasons, but "The Pink Panther Strikes Again" may look familiar even to those who didn't see it last time around: Much of the story line was taken from one of the "Pink Panther" movies, the 1976 "The Pink Panther Strikes Again."
ENTERTAINMENT
February 3, 2004 | Tony Perry, Times Staff Writer
You've already seen "Women Who Steal," the frenzied dark comedy about gender conflict at the San Diego Repertory Theatre. Yes, really.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 8, 1988 | MARK CHALON SMITH
Much like his short stories, Tennessee Williams' one-act plays are slight, lyrical and romantic expressions. And like his full-length dramas, they dwell (sometimes inordinately) on characters who must create a fantasy environment to survive the hardness of real life, a place made that way by hard people. Williams dabbled in one-acts (and short stories) all through his career; some acted as poetic outlines for the larger works, many stood alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 10, 1993 | JAN HERMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The cultural anthropology of "The Dining Room," A. R. Gurney's playful treatment of the disappearing Northeastern WASP, can be skewed toward nostalgia or satire with overweening zeal. Any director inclined to make the case for "creative" staging can find logic on both sides. To lean too heavily in either direction, however, seems a distortion of what Gurney had in mind. Which is why Keith Wolfe's foursquare approach to the play at the Costa Mesa Playhouse has a certain appeal.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 17, 1997 | JACK MATHEWS, FOR THE TIMES
In 1952 Quebec, Catholic Bishop Bilodeau is summoned to a maximum security prison to hear the confession of Simon Doucet, a dying man convicted of murder. But no sooner is he seated in the confessional than the bishop learns he's there to rehash his own sins and to make his own confession.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 2, 1995
I found the conflicting assessments of "To Wong Foo, Thanks for Everything! Julie Newmar" by Michael Kearns and Donald MacKechnie to be so very male (" 'Julie Newmar': Disguised Gay-Bashing or Artful Story?" Calendar, Sept. 25). Since the film was also reviewed by your male film critic Kenneth Turan, perhaps what we need is a female perspective. Kearns wondered how Wesley Snipes and "Today" show host Bryant Gumbel, on whose show Snipes appeared, "would respond to a white actor, pulling out all the stereotypes, pretending to be African American."
NEWS
February 5, 1993 | RAY LOYND, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The Actors Company, which created the lifelike "Town Meeting" by engaging the audience in what appeared to be a heated city coun cil meeting, is staging another play about the schism between personal power and representative government--Shakespeare's pointed political drama "Coriolanus," at the Burbank Little Theatre. But we are not in the world of ancient Rome.
TRAVEL
April 30, 1989
For the vacationer looking for one of those laid-back mountain hideaways, Coffee Tree Ranch in California's Trinity Alps wilderness area (northwest of Redding) promises to lift the spirits. Streams to lull you to sleep, a trout pond on the property. The ranch is surrounded by maples, oaks, firs. Mark and Ruth Hartman describe their spread as "scenic, wild, unspoiled." Seven family cabins, seven one-bedroom units. Several with fireplaces, others with wood-burning stoves. Home-cooked meals, a heated swimming pool, hayrides, gold panning.
NEWS
March 14, 1987 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX, Times Staff Writer
After the contras overran La Estancia in 1982, the surviving men of the village left their women and children in a squalid refugee shelter and marched off to fight in the Sandinista militia. When most of the militiamen returned 11 months later, they found a rebuilt cooperative with new tractors in the cornfields and a feminist revolution in the wind.
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