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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Susan King
Four more actors have been added to the cast of “Jobs,” the new biopic about the late Steve Jobs, the computer designer and inventor who was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive ofApple Inc. Joining Ashton Kutcher, who is starring as Jobs, are Ron Eldard (“Super 8”) as Apple designer Ron Holt; John Getz (“The Social Network”) as Jobs' adoptive father Paul Jobs; Lesley Ann Warren (“Victor/Victoria”) as his adoptive mother; and James Woods (“Salvador,” “Nixon”)
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ENTERTAINMENT
October 3, 2013 | By F. Kathleen Foley
“Flowers for Algernon” certainly has traction. Daniel Keyes' 1959 short story about Charlie Gordon, a mentally disabled man transformed into a genius by a scientific experiment, has been subsequently adapted into a novel, a film and even a musical.  Now, David Rogers' 1969 play has been mounted by the Deaf West company at the Whitefire Theatre in Sherman Oaks. The highly sentimentalized drama seems an unusual choice for Deaf West, and the production, which in typical Deaf West fashion utilizes both signing and voiced actors, does not always avoid bathos.  Matthew McCray, a hearing director and the veteran of dozens of professional productions, helms the hugely ambitious proceedings, but despite the fact that the play has been pared down from a cast of nearly 30 to an even dozen or so, the sheer scope of this undertaking sometimes exceeds McCray's usually authoritative grasp.  CHEAT SHEET: Fall arts preview A chief culprit is Sarah Krainin's scenic design, which consists primarily of clear screens on metal poles that are shoved on a system of runners into various configurations.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Audiences acquainted with the "Saturday Night Live" character MacGruber - a bumbling special-ops agent who rather consistently fails to save the day -  might be surprised to see the man who portrays him, Will Forte, co-starring in Alexander Payne's new black-and-white drama "Nebraska. " Speaking at the Envelope Screening Series recently, Payne explained why he doesn't hesitate to cast comedic actors in dramatic roles. "I've found that in the past I'm often drawn to people with good comic timing to perform in dramatic parts," the director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
If the title of Donald Freed's new play, now at the Skylight Theatre, doesn't prompt you to quote Macbeth (“Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow…”), you are probably not its intended demographic. The heart of “Tomorrow” is three actors discussing and rehearsing scenes from the Shakespeare tragedy. And, yes, it sounds dry and cerebral, like something only a dramaturge would be into. As I actually have a degree in dramaturgy, you might roll your eyes when I say I was on the edge of my seat as I watched the characters hunt Lady Macbeth's psychology through the text, history and their own pasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 27, 2011 | By Rebecca Keegan, Los Angeles Times
The death of a child is every parent's worst nightmare. So when Nicole Kidman took on the role of a mother mourning the loss of her 4-year-old son in "Rabbit Hole" just a year after giving birth to a daughter in real life, she knew she was venturing into emotionally treacherous territory. "I had a conversation with my husband, because I needed him to understand that I've got to go exist in a limbo place for a while," the actress said. "It's a strange balancing act. " Yet during production, Kidman found her equilibrium faltering, unable to contain to the set the experience of her character's grief.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | Greg Braxton
Television has been proudly brandishing its "Golden Era" calling card of late largely on the merits of the many top dramas being produced on prime time and cable over the last few years. It's a rise in quality such that any demarcation line between film stars and TV stars has been wiped away - film actors who may have once shunned the small screen are increasingly embracing television dramas, proclaiming that the most creative stories and interesting characters are to be found there, and TV actors, well, they know a good thing when they've got it. The Envelope invited five such actors to take part in the Envelope drama panel - Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad," Connie Britton of "Nashville," Andrew Lincoln of "The Walking Dead," Elisabeth Moss of "Mad Men" and Kevin Bacon in his first TV series, "The Following.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Robert Ito, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Seduce with the eyes," says actor Sung Kang, making love to a store mannequin in the premiere episode of the online TV series "Acting for Action. " A veteran of the "Fast and the Furious" movie franchise, Kang is teaching his craft to YouTube star Ryan Higa, whose online fan base numbers more than 5 million subscribers. Higa is eager to learn from a real film star, but Kang - playing a self-worshiping caricature of himself - is clearly just in it for the cash. The bit is played for laughs, but the setup raises an intriguing question: When it comes to Asian American actors and their younger YouTubing peers, who should be schooling whom?
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
In the hierarchy of television, being a freak and a geek is a good thing. And the five actors who gathered to talk to The Envelope about their characters' kooky idiosyncrasies (germophobia, social awkwardness, selfishness and then there's the shape-shifting and murdering) — and the effect of their shows on the fanboy (and girl) audience — are at the upper echelon of the TV pecking order, some might say. Following are edited excerpts from our chat — moderated by Times television critic Robert Lloyd — with Johnny Galecki ("Big Bang Theory")
ENTERTAINMENT
November 22, 1987
At first I thought it might be Kafka I was reading, then it struck me. It was the best definition of Hell I'd read in years: "Who would think to go into a field of employment in which a certain level of training and skill is at the same time mandatory and immaterial?" The light shed in Lawrence Christon's article ("So Many Actors, So Few Roles," Nov. 15) was at once heartbreaking and perfectly true. AL ALU, actor Los Angeles
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