Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsActors
IN THE NEWS

Actors

ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Susan King
Four more actors have been added to the cast of “Jobs,” the new biopic about the late Steve Jobs, the computer designer and inventor who was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive ofApple Inc. Joining Ashton Kutcher, who is starring as Jobs, are Ron Eldard (“Super 8”) as Apple designer Ron Holt; John Getz (“The Social Network”) as Jobs' adoptive father Paul Jobs; Lesley Ann Warren (“Victor/Victoria”) as his adoptive mother; and James Woods (“Salvador,” “Nixon”)
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Audiences acquainted with the "Saturday Night Live" character MacGruber - a bumbling special-ops agent who rather consistently fails to save the day -  might be surprised to see the man who portrays him, Will Forte, co-starring in Alexander Payne's new black-and-white drama "Nebraska. " Speaking at the Envelope Screening Series recently, Payne explained why he doesn't hesitate to cast comedic actors in dramatic roles. "I've found that in the past I'm often drawn to people with good comic timing to perform in dramatic parts," the director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 20, 1989
"War and Peace on Vietnam Film Front" (by Daniel Cerone, April 29) included comments by actress Kieu Chinh, a technical adviser on "War Story," quoted as saying: "I am careful to make sure Vietnamese are presented accurately. On 'War Story' we use only Vietnamese actors. Other television shows and films use Japanese and Chinese to portray Vietnamese." As a board member of the Assn. of Asian Pacific American Artists (AAPAA), an organization working to improve the image of Asian-Americans in the media as well as speaking out on issues regarding the Asian-American acting community, I feel another, more pervasive viewpoint should be heard.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010
Michael Mann is a visual stylist of the highest order, but he has gotten signature performances from elite actors. He reflects on some of them: Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Last of the Mohicans" (1992) "There's a tremendous confidence that you get as an actor that you as a man or as a woman can do what your character does. If you're playing Daniel Boone and you know that you can be dumped into wilderness and have breakfast, lunch and dinner, four seasons a year, and survive, it shows.
NEWS
February 7, 2013 | By John Horn, Los Angeles Times
Here are some things you need to know about Quentin Tarantino. He pens his screenplays longhand, not on a word processor. "I can't write poetry on a computer, man," he says. If you're an actor, don't expect to improvise. Ever. "You hire an actor to learn the lines and say them," Tarantino says. Unless you're Samuel L. Jackson, who can wing it. OSCAR WATCH: 'Django Unchained' And if you're with the filmmaker and he stumbles upon one of his movies on cable TV, don't expect to go anywhere.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 22, 2012 | By Robert Ito, Special to the Los Angeles Times
"Seduce with the eyes," says actor Sung Kang, making love to a store mannequin in the premiere episode of the online TV series "Acting for Action. " A veteran of the "Fast and the Furious" movie franchise, Kang is teaching his craft to YouTube star Ryan Higa, whose online fan base numbers more than 5 million subscribers. Higa is eager to learn from a real film star, but Kang - playing a self-worshiping caricature of himself - is clearly just in it for the cash. The bit is played for laughs, but the setup raises an intriguing question: When it comes to Asian American actors and their younger YouTubing peers, who should be schooling whom?
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | Greg Braxton
Television has been proudly brandishing its "Golden Era" calling card of late largely on the merits of the many top dramas being produced on prime time and cable over the last few years. It's a rise in quality such that any demarcation line between film stars and TV stars has been wiped away - film actors who may have once shunned the small screen are increasingly embracing television dramas, proclaiming that the most creative stories and interesting characters are to be found there, and TV actors, well, they know a good thing when they've got it. The Envelope invited five such actors to take part in the Envelope drama panel - Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad," Connie Britton of "Nashville," Andrew Lincoln of "The Walking Dead," Elisabeth Moss of "Mad Men" and Kevin Bacon in his first TV series, "The Following.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
In the hierarchy of television, being a freak and a geek is a good thing. And the five actors who gathered to talk to The Envelope about their characters' kooky idiosyncrasies (germophobia, social awkwardness, selfishness and then there's the shape-shifting and murdering) — and the effect of their shows on the fanboy (and girl) audience — are at the upper echelon of the TV pecking order, some might say. Following are edited excerpts from our chat — moderated by Times television critic Robert Lloyd — with Johnny Galecki ("Big Bang Theory")
Los Angeles Times Articles
|