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ENTERTAINMENT
November 16, 2012 | By John Horn
If you have seen Paul Thomas Anderson's “The Master,” you might reasonably assume that very little was left to chance. From its precise cinematography to striking score, the writer-director's drama about a troubled drifter (Joaquin Phoenix) and a charismatic leader of a new movement (Philip Seymour Hoffman) feels as well-planned as a military operation. But in this excerpt from the Envelope Screening Series this week, Anderson explains that his two lead actors brought far more to their performances than he ever imagined, and that the film's production team frequently improvised.
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ENTERTAINMENT
June 26, 2012 | By Susan King
Four more actors have been added to the cast of “Jobs,” the new biopic about the late Steve Jobs, the computer designer and inventor who was co-founder, chairman, and chief executive ofApple Inc. Joining Ashton Kutcher, who is starring as Jobs, are Ron Eldard (“Super 8”) as Apple designer Ron Holt; John Getz (“The Social Network”) as Jobs' adoptive father Paul Jobs; Lesley Ann Warren (“Victor/Victoria”) as his adoptive mother; and James Woods (“Salvador,” “Nixon”)
ENTERTAINMENT
October 23, 2013 | By Oliver Gettell
Audiences acquainted with the "Saturday Night Live" character MacGruber - a bumbling special-ops agent who rather consistently fails to save the day -  might be surprised to see the man who portrays him, Will Forte, co-starring in Alexander Payne's new black-and-white drama "Nebraska. " Speaking at the Envelope Screening Series recently, Payne explained why he doesn't hesitate to cast comedic actors in dramatic roles. "I've found that in the past I'm often drawn to people with good comic timing to perform in dramatic parts," the director said.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 21, 2013 | By Margaret Gray
If the title of Donald Freed's new play, now at the Skylight Theatre, doesn't prompt you to quote Macbeth (“Tomorrow and tomorrow and tomorrow…”), you are probably not its intended demographic. The heart of “Tomorrow” is three actors discussing and rehearsing scenes from the Shakespeare tragedy. And, yes, it sounds dry and cerebral, like something only a dramaturge would be into. As I actually have a degree in dramaturgy, you might roll your eyes when I say I was on the edge of my seat as I watched the characters hunt Lady Macbeth's psychology through the text, history and their own pasts.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 10, 2010
Michael Mann is a visual stylist of the highest order, but he has gotten signature performances from elite actors. He reflects on some of them: Daniel Day-Lewis in "The Last of the Mohicans" (1992) "There's a tremendous confidence that you get as an actor that you as a man or as a woman can do what your character does. If you're playing Daniel Boone and you know that you can be dumped into wilderness and have breakfast, lunch and dinner, four seasons a year, and survive, it shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 18, 2012 | By Dawn C. Chmielewski, Los Angeles Times
Three decades ago, they were teen idols. Todd Bridges played Willis on the popular sitcom "Diff'rent Strokes. " Corey Feldman starred in "Gremlins,""The Goonies" and "The Lost Boys. " The two men held the same dark secret: Each had been molested in his adolescence by men with Hollywood connections, experiences that would lead to downward spirals and years of drug addiction. Today, they are making a highly public case for California legislation they hope will protect child actors from sexual predators, a problem they say continues to bedevil the entertainment industry.
NEWS
June 17, 2011 | By Yvonne Villarreal, Los Angeles Times
In the hierarchy of television, being a freak and a geek is a good thing. And the five actors who gathered to talk to The Envelope about their characters' kooky idiosyncrasies (germophobia, social awkwardness, selfishness and then there's the shape-shifting and murdering) — and the effect of their shows on the fanboy (and girl) audience — are at the upper echelon of the TV pecking order, some might say. Following are edited excerpts from our chat — moderated by Times television critic Robert Lloyd — with Johnny Galecki ("Big Bang Theory")
ENTERTAINMENT
June 14, 2013 | Greg Braxton
Television has been proudly brandishing its "Golden Era" calling card of late largely on the merits of the many top dramas being produced on prime time and cable over the last few years. It's a rise in quality such that any demarcation line between film stars and TV stars has been wiped away - film actors who may have once shunned the small screen are increasingly embracing television dramas, proclaiming that the most creative stories and interesting characters are to be found there, and TV actors, well, they know a good thing when they've got it. The Envelope invited five such actors to take part in the Envelope drama panel - Bryan Cranston of "Breaking Bad," Connie Britton of "Nashville," Andrew Lincoln of "The Walking Dead," Elisabeth Moss of "Mad Men" and Kevin Bacon in his first TV series, "The Following.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 9, 2014 | By Martin Tsai
In the tradition of "Swingers" and "Good Will Hunting," "Dumbbells" originates from a pair of enterprising actors who have dabbled in screenwriting to generate parts for themselves. Brian Drolet and Hoyt Richards drew on their former lives as an MTV personality (Drolet) and fashion model (Richards) to write the story of an ex-jock languishing as a North Hollywood gym attendant after his promising career and superficial girlfriend both slipped from his grip. Drolet undertakes the role of the sweet-natured sad sack, while Richards plays an ex-model who assumes ownership of the gym and schemes to turn it into a set for a reality series.
BUSINESS
October 8, 2011 | By Joe Flint, Los Angeles Times
A deal has been reached with the actors who provide voices for "The Simpsons" that will keep the animated hit show on the air through its 25th season in 2013-14. The new agreement between the cast and 20th Century Fox Television, which produces the show for its sister Fox network, ends several days of tension between the two sides. Although terms of the two-year contract were not disclosed, 20th Century Fox Television had been looking to cut the salaries of the actors by as much as 45%. Each primary cast member currently makes $440,000 per episode, and the studio wanted to reduce that to about $250,000, according to people close to the situation not authorized to talk publicly about the matter.
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