Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsActresses France
IN THE NEWS

Actresses France

FEATURED ARTICLES
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1994 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the course of an interview at Manhattan's chic Paramount Hotel, French actress Fanny Ardant twice mimics a dog. The first time, it serves as punctuation to a spirited defense of the cunning Countess Ferraud, the character she plays in "Colonel Chabert," the new Gerard Depardieu film set in 19th-Century France, which opened last week.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2011 | Myrna Oliver, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Frances Bay, the sweet, gentle housewife who became a successful actress in middle age, appearing in more than 50 motion pictures and 100 television shows, including roles as the "marble rye lady" on "Seinfeld" and the grandmother in Adam Sandler's "Happy Gilmore," has died. She was 92. Bay, also popular as a stage actress in local theaters, died Thursday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said her cousin Marly Zaslov of Vancouver. Bay had been ill with various infections.
Advertisement
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
FRANCES CONROY and her husband are building a compound. In Echo Park. If truth dwells in the details, this alone may be enough information. Conroy is an Emmy-nominated actress just emerging from the final season of a hit TV show, an actress with one film out ("Broken Flowers") and one about to begin shooting ("The Wicker Man"). She has won a Golden Globe and an Obie and been nominated for a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 18, 2005 | Mary McNamara, Times Staff Writer
FRANCES CONROY and her husband are building a compound. In Echo Park. If truth dwells in the details, this alone may be enough information. Conroy is an Emmy-nominated actress just emerging from the final season of a hit TV show, an actress with one film out ("Broken Flowers") and one about to begin shooting ("The Wicker Man"). She has won a Golden Globe and an Obie and been nominated for a Tony.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | David Gritten, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
Actresses who win an Oscar usually move swiftly to capitalize on their success. With their agents they seek high-profile, lucrative screen roles to ride the wave of their new-found visibility. For who knows how long it will last? Acting is precarious, especially for women; this year's hot face easily becomes next year's "remember her?" That's how most Oscar-winning actresses react to their triumph. Frances McDormand, it's fair to say, follows another path entirely.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 17, 2011 | Myrna Oliver, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Frances Bay, the sweet, gentle housewife who became a successful actress in middle age, appearing in more than 50 motion pictures and 100 television shows, including roles as the "marble rye lady" on "Seinfeld" and the grandmother in Adam Sandler's "Happy Gilmore," has died. She was 92. Bay, also popular as a stage actress in local theaters, died Thursday at Providence Tarzana Medical Center, said her cousin Marly Zaslov of Vancouver. Bay had been ill with various infections.
ENTERTAINMENT
July 19, 1998 | David Gritten, David Gritten is a regular contributor to Calendar
Actresses who win an Oscar usually move swiftly to capitalize on their success. With their agents they seek high-profile, lucrative screen roles to ride the wave of their new-found visibility. For who knows how long it will last? Acting is precarious, especially for women; this year's hot face easily becomes next year's "remember her?" That's how most Oscar-winning actresses react to their triumph. Frances McDormand, it's fair to say, follows another path entirely.
ENTERTAINMENT
December 30, 1994 | PATRICK PACHECO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the course of an interview at Manhattan's chic Paramount Hotel, French actress Fanny Ardant twice mimics a dog. The first time, it serves as punctuation to a spirited defense of the cunning Countess Ferraud, the character she plays in "Colonel Chabert," the new Gerard Depardieu film set in 19th-Century France, which opened last week.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|