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Acupuncture

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SCIENCE
January 24, 2009 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Acupuncture prevents headaches and migraines but faked treatments when needles are incorrectly inserted appear to work nearly as well, German researchers said Wednesday. Their findings suggest the benefits of acupuncture may stem more from belief in the technique, said Klaus Linde, a researcher at the Technical University in Munich, who led the analysis published in the Cochrane Review journal. Studies have shown that acupressure and acupuncture may stimulate the release of endorphins, which can relieve stress, pain and nausea.
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BUSINESS
November 12, 2013 | By Stuart Pfeifer
All the amenities of modern medicine are available at a new West Los Angeles hospital. There's 24-hour emergency care, a team of surgeons, psychology and physical therapy units, MRI and CT machines, one of the top oncologists in the country. Medical assistants busily roam the halls, soothing patients' fears with smiles, kind words or gentle touches. But they have to watch out: The patients can bite. They're dogs, cats and other pets being treated at the VCA West Los Angeles Animal Hospital, which at 42,000 square feet is the largest pet hospital west of the Mississippi River.
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NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Acupuncture gave some relief to people suffering from seasonal allergies, but the improvements didn't last much beyond treatment, researchers said. The researchers, from several institutions in the United States and Germany, studied seasonal allergic rhinitis, characterized by a runny and stuffy nose caused by plant pollen allergies. They divided 422 people in Germany into three groups: one treated with acupuncture, one with sham acupuncture and one with antihistamines. The people in the first two groups also were allowed to take antihistamines if needed.
SPORTS
September 14, 2013 | By Kevin Baxter
Turns out Hanley Ramirez is afraid of needles. "When I was a kid I used to be sick all the time," Ramirez said Saturday. "They used to put a lot of needles in my body, so I just got afraid. " Lately, the Dodgers shortstop has been forced to confront that fear. Friday he had two cortisone injections for an irritated nerve in his back. And for most of the season he has been getting regular acupuncture to treat the same problem, which he says has become chronic over the last three years.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Acupuncture eases some kinds of chronic pain - and it's not just a placebo effect at work, researchers who looked at data from nearly 18,000 patients found. An estimated 3 million American adults get acupuncture treatments annually; still, there “remains considerable controversy as to its value,” the researchers wrote in a study published this week in the Archives of Internal Medicine. But they found that for back and neck pain, chronic headache, osteoarthritis and shoulder pain, acupuncture works better than no treatment and better than “sham” acupuncture - done, for example, with needles inserted superficially or with needles that retract into the handles instead of going into the skin.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Women who suffer from hot flashes and other uncomfortable symptoms of menopause may be able to find relief through acupuncture, according to a new study. The idea of having to lie still for 20 minutes with needles sticking out of you may not appeal to everyone. On the other hand, hormone replacement therapy – often employed to make menopause more bearable – has some problems of its own, including an increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and breast cancer.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 3, 1989
Former state Acupuncture Examining Committee member Chae Woo Lew has pleaded no contest to conspiracy charges in a far-reaching scheme to sell answers to the state licensing exam for acupuncturists, district attorney's spokeswoman Sandi Gibbons said. So far 24 acupuncturists in Los Angeles have pleaded guilty in the scandal. Another 20 await disposition in their cases.
NEWS
March 30, 1996 | Washington Post
The Food and Drug Administration on Friday classified acupuncture needles as medical devices for "general use" by trained professionals. The agency did not go so far as to state that acupuncture is effective for any particular condition. But by designating instruments of acupuncture in the same category with such standard medical tools as scalpels and syringes, the FDA removed a major barrier to insurance coverage for the treatment.
NATIONAL
December 21, 2004 | From Associated Press
The ancient Chinese therapy of acupuncture can help ease pain and improve movement for people with arthritis of the knee, a study concludes. "For the first time, a clinical trial with sufficient rigor, size and duration has shown that acupuncture reduces the pain and functional impairment of osteoarthritis of the knee," said Dr. Stephen E. Straus, director of the National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine.
HEALTH
September 27, 2004 | Reuters
Acupuncture, already shown to help ease the nausea patients often suffer after surgery, may actually work better than drugs. A team of researchers at Duke University Medical Center in North Carolina studied 75 women undergoing major breast surgery such as breast augmentation, breast reduction or mastectomy. All needed general anesthesia to be rendered unconscious and immobile, which often causes nausea upon awakening. The 75 women were randomly divided into three groups.
NEWS
February 19, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Acupuncture gave some relief to people suffering from seasonal allergies, but the improvements didn't last much beyond treatment, researchers said. The researchers, from several institutions in the United States and Germany, studied seasonal allergic rhinitis, characterized by a runny and stuffy nose caused by plant pollen allergies. They divided 422 people in Germany into three groups: one treated with acupuncture, one with sham acupuncture and one with antihistamines. The people in the first two groups also were allowed to take antihistamines if needed.
NEWS
September 13, 2012 | By Mary MacVean
Acupuncture eases some kinds of chronic pain - and it's not just a placebo effect at work, researchers who looked at data from nearly 18,000 patients found. An estimated 3 million American adults get acupuncture treatments annually; still, there “remains considerable controversy as to its value,” the researchers wrote in a study published this week in the Archives of Internal Medicine. But they found that for back and neck pain, chronic headache, osteoarthritis and shoulder pain, acupuncture works better than no treatment and better than “sham” acupuncture - done, for example, with needles inserted superficially or with needles that retract into the handles instead of going into the skin.
HEALTH
January 30, 2012
The recent series of articles by Trine Tsouderos in the Los Angeles Times misrepresents the scientific contributions and future research agenda of the National Institutes of Health and its National Center for Complementary and Alternative Medicine ["New Age Cures Put to the Test," Jan. 23]. In its 12 years as an NIH center, NCCAM's more than 3,000 research studies have provided answers to important questions about complementary health approaches to help consumers and medical professionals make informed decisions.
HEALTH
January 2, 2012 | By Michelle Andrews, Special to the Los Angeles Times
As hospitals elbow one another to attract patients, increasingly they're hoping to tap into Americans' interest in - and willingness to spend money on - complementary and alternative therapies such as acupuncture and massage. According to a recent survey by the American Hospital Assn. and the Samueli Institute, a nonprofit research group focusing on complementary medicine, 42% of the 714 hospitals that responded offered at least one such therapy in 2010; five years earlier, only 27% of hospitals offered such treatments.
NEWS
March 10, 2011 | By Karen Kaplan, Los Angeles Times
Women who suffer from hot flashes and other uncomfortable symptoms of menopause may be able to find relief through acupuncture, according to a new study. The idea of having to lie still for 20 minutes with needles sticking out of you may not appeal to everyone. On the other hand, hormone replacement therapy – often employed to make menopause more bearable – has some problems of its own, including an increased risk of coronary heart disease, stroke and breast cancer.
NEWS
September 8, 2010
Morning sickness can be one of the most miserable parts of pregnancy -- or, at least, so I am told. Unfortunately, new research reported Wednesday suggests that there is little women can do other than grin and bear it, since there appear to be no effective treatments. The pharmaceutical industry once weighed in on the issue heavily, with the result being the introduction of the now-notorious thalidomide, which caused severe birth defects in a large number of infants. That episode led to increased requirements for safety screening of drugs before they are marketed and led to the still-prevalent consensus that it is generally not safe for women to take drugs during pregnancy, especially in the first trimester, when morning sickness is at its worst.
NEWS
March 15, 1992
In your March 3 article "Getting to the Point," you discuss medical doctors' attitudes about acupuncture. You state that they have generally viewed acupuncture with suspicion, and that some doctors view it as a harmless ritual. I have had hundreds of acupuncture treatments from various practitioners. I have studied traditional Oriental medicine for the last 20 years. Who cares what the doctors think? Most doctors I know are ignorant of Oriental medicine. They can't answer a simple question based on Page 1 of the most elementary text.
NEWS
January 21, 1989 | JACK JONES and JOHN H. LEE, Times Staff Writers
A member of the Board of California Acupuncture Examining Committee was arrested Friday evening on suspicion of taking at least $800,000 in bribes from applicants for the state acupuncture certification examination, the Los Angeles County district attorney's office said. Dr. Chae Woo Lew, 53, of Hillsborough, was taken into custody shortly after 6 p.m. at the Los Angeles Airport Hyatt by district attorney's investigators, spokesman Al Albergate said.
OPINION
July 4, 2010
As Alcoholics Anonymous prepares to celebrate its 75th anniversary, we asked one of its members to write about the group and how he came to join. Following in the tradition of the organization, he is using his first name only. My name is Chas. I'm an alcoholic. I stumbled into my first AA meeting in fall 1997. I had been a hard drinker for 20 years and a serious drunk for the last 10. I had lost my job, was about to lose my family and was having serious health problems.
NATIONAL
December 6, 2009 | By Kim Geiger and Tom Hamburger
Acupuncturists, dietary-supplement makers and other alternative health practitioners, some of whose treatments are considered unproven by the medical establishment, would be brought more squarely into the mainstream of American medicine under the health legislation now before the Senate. The legislation would allow doctors to incorporate alternative health providers in some treatment plans. It also includes language that some believe could require insurance companies to expand their coverage for alternative therapies, on which Americans now spend $34 billion a year.
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