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Adam And Eve

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NEWS
February 4, 1988 | SHIRLEY MARLOW
It was difficult to keep order in the court, what with the exhibits sticking their tongues out at the judge. But Cook County Associate Judge Ann Houser had not expected this to be an ordinary case. Houser found Thomas Fabing guilty of keeping life-threatening reptiles--two Burmese pythons and an 8-foot boa constrictor named Crusher--in his home, a misdemeanor. Defense attorney Michael Fabing, Thomas' brother, brought the snakes into the Chicago courtroom as evidence.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 30, 1996 | From Associated Press
Adam and Eve may have been created in "some other form" than human and it is possible that the first living creature was a "lower animal," Cardinal John O'Connor has told worshipers at St. Patrick's Cathedral. The sermon last Sunday by the head of the New York archdiocese came a month after Pope John Paul II said the theory of evolution was "more than just a hypothesis."
ENTERTAINMENT
April 6, 2014 | By Mark Olsen
It's not so much that Jim Jarmusch has edged toward the mainstream but rather that the mainstream has moved closer to him. Over the years the gravitational pull of his slant, laconic sensibility in films such as "Mystery Train," "Dead Man" and "Broken Flowers" has brought him in contact with a classic gallery of performers including Tom Waits, Joe Strummer, Gena Rowlands, Johnny Depp, Bill Murray and many more. Though he first emerged from the outcast environs of the late '70s/early '80s post-punk scene of New York, he has recently received retrospectives from the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences in Los Angeles and the Film Society of Lincoln Center . At 61 he is no longer a punk outsider but part of the pantheon.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
She is a beguiling Eve with a profusion of corkscrew curls and an earful of bad advice from a wily serpent. He is a befuddled Adam who holds forbidden fruit in one hand and scratches his head with the other. Life-size and all- but-nude, they have been standing under the biblical Tree of Knowledge -- on the brink of original sin -- since German artist Lucas Cranach the Elder painted them nearly 500 years ago. And they are a big reason art lovers go to the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
A long-running lawsuit to force the Norton Simon Museum to surrender one of its prized artworks, 480-year-old paired paintings of Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder that were looted during the Holocaust, has reached what could be its last legal round: plaintiff Marei Von Saher's recent appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. If her appeal fails, it could have far-reaching implications, potentially undermining a larger class of claims to recover Nazi-looted art. Von Saher, who lives in Connecticut, contends that the "Adam and Eve" diptych that has hung in the Pasadena museum since the late 1970s remains stolen goods.
NEWS
January 3, 1993
From the TV Times article (Dec. 20) about Charlton Heston's new series on the Bible ("Charlton Heston Presents The Bible," A&E), I learned that Heston will not only portray Moses again, but other biblical figures, including Adam and Eve. Parting the Red Sea was a cinch for Heston as Moses ("The Ten Commandments"). But playing Adam and Eve? I can hardly wait. Collette North, Los Angeles
ENTERTAINMENT
April 26, 1989 | RAY LOYND
Out of the raging darkness of Mark Twain's pessimism in his later years blossomed a curious little novelette called "Eve's Diary." The passages have a certain wistfulness about them, unlike anything Twain ever wrote. Actor-adapter David Birney has combined "Eve's Diary" with an earlier Garden of Eden piece by Twain called "Extracts From Adam's Diary" into "American Playhouse's" endearing "The Diaries of Adam and Eve" (at 9 tonight on Channels 28 and 15). Birney and Meredith Baxter Birney portray the universe's first lovers as Twain fashioned them--Eve is wiser, smarter and much more eager for a relationship than Adam, who is exasperated by Eve's relentless talk and who doesn't fall in love with her until after the great Fall and exile from the Garden.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 10, 2014 | By Sheri Linden
With the YA swoon of "Twilight" safely in the rearview mirror, movie vampires get their mojo back in the sensuous dreamscape of "Only Lovers Left Alive," one of the strongest films yet from Jim Jarmusch. A filmmaker with a deep affection for outsiders, Jarmusch sets his ode to the urbane undead - and margin-dwelling artists - in two ultra-poetic cities: Detroit, a vision of trampled grandeur on the cusp of rebirth, and worldly Tangier, its alleyways alive with the murmur of illicit doings.
ENTERTAINMENT
February 16, 1999 | DON SHIRLEY, TIMES THEATER WRITER
Praise be to Fullerton Civic Light Opera for briefly forsaking familiar fare in favor of "Children of Eden." Among biblical-inspired, rock-influenced musicals, this one just might be the best. It tackles big themes, provoking thought while maintaining a modicum of humor. The score should appeal to people of many creeds, musical tastes and ages.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 2, 2012 | By Mike Boehm, Los Angeles Times
A long-running lawsuit to force the Norton Simon Museum to surrender one of its prized artworks, 480-year-old paired paintings of Adam and Eve by Lucas Cranach the Elder that were looted during the Holocaust, has reached what could be its last legal round: plaintiff Marei Von Saher's recent appeal to the U.S. 9th Circuit Court of Appeals. If her appeal fails, it could have far-reaching implications, potentially undermining a larger class of claims to recover Nazi-looted art. Von Saher, who lives in Connecticut, contends that the "Adam and Eve" diptych that has hung in the Pasadena museum since the late 1970s remains stolen goods.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 22, 2009 | Suzanne Muchnic
She is a beguiling Eve with a profusion of corkscrew curls and an earful of bad advice from a wily serpent. He is a befuddled Adam who holds forbidden fruit in one hand and scratches his head with the other. Life-size and all- but-nude, they have been standing under the biblical Tree of Knowledge -- on the brink of original sin -- since German artist Lucas Cranach the Elder painted them nearly 500 years ago. And they are a big reason art lovers go to the Norton Simon Museum in Pasadena.
ENTERTAINMENT
March 15, 2009 | Susan Salter Reynolds
The creation story is the best improv exercise ever invented. Creation and destruction, self and no-self, story and history, fiction and nonfiction chase themselves in endless circles. The creation story is the Mobius strip, the double helix, the pattern language of art. For an artist to take it on, she must feel that she is really ready to take it on. It is an act of calligraphy -- too much ego and the mirror that is the story cracks, the pool ripples. Narcissus remains deluded.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 19, 2007 | Suzanne Muchnic, Times Staff Writer
A Los Angeles federal judge has dismissed a case that jeopardized the Norton Simon Museum's ownership of a nearly 500-year-old pair of paintings of Adam and Eve by German artist Lucas Cranach the Elder. The action halts dueling lawsuits filed by the museum and Marei von Saher of Connecticut, the heir of a Jewish art dealer who lost the artworks to the Nazis in World War II. The museum filed a motion to dismiss the case, and a hearing was to be held Monday. But Judge John F.
HOME & GARDEN
October 7, 2004 | Lili Singer, Special to The Times
Susan Stringfellow's house in Los Angeles turns heads with its elegant co-mingling of solid and soft, stark and sensual, modern and primitive. In that spirit, when she and Nancy Goslee Power revived its weary landscape, they agreed on one thing: The pomegranate would stay. "It added age to the design," Power says. "It's important to leave a grandparent when redoing a garden."
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2004 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
After a dozen years of trial upon tribulation, things are looking up for the Lula Washington Dance Theatre. Among the good news: a permanent company home on Crenshaw Boulevard to be christened next month and the local troupe's first appearance at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Friday night.
ENTERTAINMENT
October 11, 1985 | DAN SULLIVAN, Times Theater Critic
Two things that can't be conveyed in a photograph: the ugliness of the facade of the new James A. Doolitle Theatre in Hollywood (formerly the Huntington Hartford), and the beauty of its first show, Martha Clarke's "The Garden of Earthly Delights." The first brings to the mind's eye the image of the Hartford facade as we have known it since the 1950s, coupled with the devout wish that it had been left alone.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2004 | Sara Wolf, Special to The Times
After a dozen years of trial upon tribulation, things are looking up for the Lula Washington Dance Theatre. Among the good news: a permanent company home on Crenshaw Boulevard to be christened next month and the local troupe's first appearance at the Cerritos Center for the Performing Arts on Friday night.
HOME & GARDEN
July 24, 2003 | Chris Erskine, Times Staff Writer
Meet Dan Petrie Jr., a screenwriter who can't keep a secret. "My favorite feature is the bathroom," Petrie says. But there's none evident in his unassuming home office. Just bookshelves, hugging every wall. "Watch this," he says, and swings open a bookcase that leads to a full bathroom, a hideaway within his hideaway. Welcome to the working world of screenwriters and their home offices, the maternity wards of pop culture, birthplaces of creativity. Or not.
NEWS
October 20, 2000 | ANTHONY DAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Most of the essays in "Did Adam and Eve Have Navels?," writes veteran science writer and playful gadfly Martin Gardner, are "attacks on far-out cases of pseudoscience." Gardner's targets are generally not the religious notions or superstitions of people swept along by their ancient cultures but phony science promulgated by, and believed in, by people who should know better.
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