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Adobe

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1999 | ROBERTO J. MANZANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Commuter convenience is being balanced against historical interest as city transportation officials debate preservationists over access to a new subway stop. At issue is the foundation of the adobe where the treaty ending the Mexican-American War in California was signed. The Los Angeles Department of Transportation plans to pave over a portion of the foundation of the historic adobe at Campo de Cahuenga when it widens Lankershim Boulevard by 16 feet for two turn lanes, said James M.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 10, 1987 | DOUG SMITH, Times Staff Writer
She's a footloose, philosophical wisp of an artist in tattered jeans and T-shirt. She wanders the world greeting each day with a spontaneous smile and toils with the earth till dusk. She came from Germany, by way of her home in Japan, crossing Tibet and China, traveling by rail and boat and bus--by airplane when she had no other way. She's landed in Valencia. She's called Nobi, which means "field and fire" in Japanese.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 7, 2000 | KARIMA A. HAYNES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A group of schoolchildren got a real-life history lesson Thursday as they watched archeologists unearth a portion of a historic adobe's foundation at Campo de Cahuenga. The ruins are beneath a parking lot next to the Metropolitan Transportation Authority's Red Line subway station now being built on Lankershim Boulevard across from Universal Studios. According to historians, the adobe is where an 1847 peace agreement was signed ending the Mexican War in California.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 5, 1995 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Members of the San Fernando Valley Historical Society, angry over delays to repair quake damage at the historic Andres Pico Adobe, finally got some good news Wednesday: An expansion plan received initial approval. The city's Recreation and Parks Commission backed a plan to move four historic bungalows to the 2.5-acre adobe park to house a research center and tour office for the historical society, which manages the adobe.
ENTERTAINMENT
August 21, 1997 | IRENE GARCIA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The history of the Leonis Adobe in Calabasas is well-documented, but most people don't realize it's still a great place to spend an afternoon relaxing in a peaceful farm setting that includes shaded benches under lush oaks. The Monterey-style house was built in 1844 and was home to a Basque immigrant, Miguel Leonis, and his Indian wife, Espiritu. Leonis, who was also known as the "King of Calabasas," was one of the earliest and most colorful settlers of the San Fernando Valley.
NEWS
October 9, 1990 | TERRY PRISTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Out in the New Mexico desert, rows of man-made adobe walls lined up like tombstones are being treated with chemicals and soaked with water. Not far away, remnants of a 19th-Century adobe fort sit under a canopy of fabric specially color-coordinated to blend in with the Southwestern landscape. These simple structures at Ft.
NATIONAL
June 20, 2010 | By Michael Headerle, Los Angeles Times
Tommy Tafoya and his sons were taking a break from building a $400,000 custom adobe home to spend a few days trowelling a thick mixture of mud and straw onto the walls of a 195-year-old Catholic church, and he looked a little weary. But all things considered, "this is easy," Tafoya said, pushing back his mud-spattered straw hat to gaze up at the massive rounded buttresses of the San Francisco de Asis church. "The ones that built it are the ones that had it hard." As dozens of volunteers busied themselves around the site, Tafoya said the enjarre — the annual ritual of applying fresh mud to the walls of the adobe church — united the parishioners.
HOME & GARDEN
September 25, 2003 | Barbara King
Just look at the texture of the walls, their thickness. At the plain, four-paned window and how it lets in exactly the right amount of light, illuminating the old room but not overtaking it. Even in its ravaged state, the house remains beautiful. Desolation and decay have only, in the end, strengthened its integrity, lent it a mysticism and a silence. Few styles of architecture appeal to me more than the simple adobe.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 7, 1997 | NICOLAI OUROUSSOFF, TIMES ARCHITECTURE CRITIC
Adobe walls. Red tile roofs. Wrought iron. Nothing sends developers and planning boards into a romantic swoon like the Mission style. Who wants concrete strip malls if you can hide them under Mission-like roofs? Isn't an Arco gas station more palatable if it's made of adobe? Aren't these vaguely Spanish structures a relief from the endless rows of pale pink and baby blue bungalows? It is a cute fairy tale. But it could also suffocate us.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 1, 2012 | By Tony Barboza, Los Angeles Times
This storied adobe mansion outside Los Angeles was once a getaway for California's last governor under Mexican rule, a landowner so wealthy he called the nearly 9,000 acres of land around it his "ranchito. " Now, state budget cuts have reduced supporters of Pio Pico State Historic Park to begging for recyclables to cash in to keep the gates to the 1850s landmark from closing. As California moves to close dozens of state parks by July 1 to save money, those fighting to prevent the closures are growing increasingly desperate.
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