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Adolescent Health

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NEWS
June 8, 1990 | From Times Wire Services
Teen-agers are less healthy than their parents were at the same age due to increases in alcohol and drug abuse, violence and sexually transmitted diseases, a blue-ribbon panel said today. The National Commission on the Role of the School and the Community in Improving Adolescent Health recommended that teen-age health clinics be set up in every community with services available to all, regardless of ability to pay.
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SCIENCE
January 3, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A controversial new study argues that a host of research on gay, lesbian and bisexual teenagers could be based on faulty data because of confused teens and “jokesters” who later said they were straight. The report focuses on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a survey that followed a nationally representative group of tens of thousands of teens into adulthood. Add Health, as it is known, is considered one of the most important sources of data on the lives of young people, including those who are gay, lesbian and bisexual.
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NEWS
June 25, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Dr. Irving N. Klitsner vividly remembers the first time he realized that teen-agers deserve their own place in the health-care system. In 1954, the pediatrician had just set up a new office full of colorful, toddler-size plastic chairs and toys. But a 14-year-old girl saw the room as less than tasteful. "I'm not going to that baby clinic!" she yelped to her mother, returning to the parking lot and locking herself in the car. "The mother was embarrassed and tried to apologize.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
What does it matter if you were cute in high school? More than you might think. A new study undertaken by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Texas at Austin finds that teens rated as good-looking in high school got higher grades and were ultimately more likely to graduate college and get bigger paychecks as adults. Well into adulthood, “people's personal appearance has powerful effects on their life chances,” sociologists Rachel A. Gordon and Robert Crosnoe wrote in a briefing paper prepared for the Council on Contemporary Families.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
America is raising a generation of adolescents plagued by pregnancies, illegal drug use, suicide and violence, a panel that included medical and education leaders reported Friday. "We are absolutely convinced that, if we don't take action immediately, we're going to find ourselves with a failing economy and social unrest," said Roseann Bentley of the National Assn. of State Boards of Education.
HEALTH
March 5, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
TEENS who lose their virginity earlier than their peers are more likely to steal, destroy property, shoplift or sell drugs than their virgin counterparts, according to one of the first studies to look at what happens in the lives of teens in the years after they start having sex.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 18, 1987
I am a physician associated with the Kaiser Permanente Medical organization for the past 33 years and I'm presently involved in full-time adolescent health care in Los Angeles (Sunset Hospital). At a point in history in which overall mortality and morbidity rates are declining steadily for virtually all segments of the population, the incidence of death and illness among 40 million American adolescents is 11% higher than it was 10 years ago. Five important factors have been recognized as contributing to the problems of today's teen-agers, 1--Substance abuse: Two-thirds of American youth have been known to use an illicit drug before completing high school and 20% smoke cigarettes daily.
SCIENCE
January 3, 2014 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
A controversial new study argues that a host of research on gay, lesbian and bisexual teenagers could be based on faulty data because of confused teens and “jokesters” who later said they were straight. The report focuses on the National Longitudinal Study of Adolescent Health, a survey that followed a nationally representative group of tens of thousands of teens into adulthood. Add Health, as it is known, is considered one of the most important sources of data on the lives of young people, including those who are gay, lesbian and bisexual.
SCIENCE
December 12, 2013 | By Emily Alpert Reyes
What does it matter if you were cute in high school? More than you might think. A new study undertaken by researchers from the University of Illinois at Chicago and the University of Texas at Austin finds that teens rated as good-looking in high school got higher grades and were ultimately more likely to graduate college and get bigger paychecks as adults. Well into adulthood, “people's personal appearance has powerful effects on their life chances,” sociologists Rachel A. Gordon and Robert Crosnoe wrote in a briefing paper prepared for the Council on Contemporary Families.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps one of every five of America's 31 million adolescents has at least one serious health problem and many often face "formidable" barriers in trying to obtain basic health care, according to a federal report released Monday.
NEWS
May 7, 2013 | By Mary MacVean
Adolescents who went to McDonald's and Subway in Los Angeles bought about the same number of calories at each, despite Subway's reputation as a healthier place to eat, researchers said. The menus are not the point, lead researcher Dr. Lenard Lesser of the Palo Alto Medical Foundation Research Institute said by phone. “Our study was not based on what people have the ability to pick, our study was based on what adolescents actually selected in a real-world setting.” The adolescents bought an average of 1,038 calories at McDonald's and 955 calories at Subway.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
When your teen comes home slurring, swaying and smelling of alcohol, here's a research finding that will help you pinpoint whom to finger as the major "bad influence" in the kid's life. First, a couple of hints: It's not that rowdy gang of boys your son hangs out with, and it's not those girls who wear too much makeup that your daughter's fallen in with. It's also not the new love interest in your kid's life, either (well, not precisely). In fact, a new study finds the most potent change agent upon your kid's risky drinking behavior is his new girlfriend's group of BFFs, or her new boyfriend's entourage of guys.
HEALTH
March 5, 2007 | Susan Brink, Times Staff Writer
TEENS who lose their virginity earlier than their peers are more likely to steal, destroy property, shoplift or sell drugs than their virgin counterparts, according to one of the first studies to look at what happens in the lives of teens in the years after they start having sex.
HEALTH
April 5, 1999 | Marla Bolotsky
We often hear that our health in our 40s, 50s and beyond is a product of what we did in our younger years. Did you use enough sunscreen? Eat too much junk food? Get enough calcium? Drink enough water? Smoke or drink to excess? How much is too much? What better time to start building healthy habits than in the adolescent and teen years? And what better destination for cyber-savvy young people to seek out health information than the Internet?
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While policymakers agonize over how to stem the flow of teenage pregnancies, obstetricians face another dilemma: They must help a child give birth to a child as safely as possible. Here are a few of the obstacles that teen moms-to-be and their doctors encounter. The Moms: It's very likely a pregnant teen has received inadequate prenatal care, so health problems affecting mother and fetus might have gone undetected.
NEWS
June 25, 1991 | SHARI ROAN, TIMES HEALTH WRITER
Dr. Irving N. Klitsner vividly remembers the first time he realized that teen-agers deserve their own place in the health-care system. In 1954, the pediatrician had just set up a new office full of colorful, toddler-size plastic chairs and toys. But a 14-year-old girl saw the room as less than tasteful. "I'm not going to that baby clinic!" she yelped to her mother, returning to the parking lot and locking herself in the car. "The mother was embarrassed and tried to apologize.
NEWS
September 30, 2011 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
When your teen comes home slurring, swaying and smelling of alcohol, here's a research finding that will help you pinpoint whom to finger as the major "bad influence" in the kid's life. First, a couple of hints: It's not that rowdy gang of boys your son hangs out with, and it's not those girls who wear too much makeup that your daughter's fallen in with. It's also not the new love interest in your kid's life, either (well, not precisely). In fact, a new study finds the most potent change agent upon your kid's risky drinking behavior is his new girlfriend's group of BFFs, or her new boyfriend's entourage of guys.
NEWS
March 27, 1996 | KATHLEEN DOHENY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
While policymakers agonize over how to stem the flow of teenage pregnancies, obstetricians face another dilemma: They must help a child give birth to a child as safely as possible. Here are a few of the obstacles that teen moms-to-be and their doctors encounter. The Moms: It's very likely a pregnant teen has received inadequate prenatal care, so health problems affecting mother and fetus might have gone undetected.
NEWS
April 23, 1991 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Perhaps one of every five of America's 31 million adolescents has at least one serious health problem and many often face "formidable" barriers in trying to obtain basic health care, according to a federal report released Monday.
NEWS
June 9, 1990 | From Associated Press
America is raising a generation of adolescents plagued by pregnancies, illegal drug use, suicide and violence, a panel that included medical and education leaders reported Friday. "We are absolutely convinced that, if we don't take action immediately, we're going to find ourselves with a failing economy and social unrest," said Roseann Bentley of the National Assn. of State Boards of Education.
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