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NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Was that janitor wearing a hood? Because nothing says "white supremacy" like picking up litter, a Ku Klux Klan group in Georgia has applied to adopt a one-mile stretch of highway through the Appalachian Mountains. That creates a quandary for that state's Department of Transportation, which is reportedly meeting with officials from the attorney general's office to decide what to do. Past experience suggests only one outcome: The Klan will get to adopt its highway. Rancor and vandalism will infect that stretch of road like the stink from a flattened skunk, and the International Keystone Knights (that's Knights, not Kops)
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NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Ku Klux Klan's reputation may be dirty, but it apparently likes clean highways. After the Georgia Department of Transportation rejected a local KKK chapter's Adopt-A-Highway application this week amid outrage from social activists, the group's leader cried foul and sought the help of the American Civil Liberties Union. "We just want to clean up the doggone road," Harley Hanson, 34, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (His official title: exalted cyclops of the Realm of Georgia.)
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OPINION
January 12, 1992
Re "Freeway Cleanup Program Generates Jam of Sponsors," Dec. 18: Leave it to the bureaucracy to ruin a good thing. The Adopt-A-Highway program is a useful and innovative idea that is accomplishing its goal, i.e., cleaning the freeways and other highways of debris at no cost to the taxpayer. So the people and companies are getting some publicity for which they are paying. So what! Now the staff director would tamper with the program to make them pay for the "free publicity." He would be better served if he initiated a program to rid his highways of graffiti--even at the cost of free publicity.
NEWS
June 11, 2012 | By Dan Turner
Was that janitor wearing a hood? Because nothing says "white supremacy" like picking up litter, a Ku Klux Klan group in Georgia has applied to adopt a one-mile stretch of highway through the Appalachian Mountains. That creates a quandary for that state's Department of Transportation, which is reportedly meeting with officials from the attorney general's office to decide what to do. Past experience suggests only one outcome: The Klan will get to adopt its highway. Rancor and vandalism will infect that stretch of road like the stink from a flattened skunk, and the International Keystone Knights (that's Knights, not Kops)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001
So the Supreme Court has allowed the Ku Klux Klan the right to advertise its participation in Missouri's "adopt-a-highway" litter clean-up program (March 6). I sure hope the Klan uses this opportunity to pick up something other than white trash. ALAN TOY Santa Monica
OPINION
November 18, 2001
Time was when I felt kindly toward Adopt-a-Highway signs. They were a low-tech, homespun recognition of small citizen groups or a family doing their part. I imagined the kids, maybe the whole family, picking up litter on weekends. But what was once cute is now an emerging cultural disaster, with the usual corporations invading our every roadway with their advertising. On the Santa Monica Freeway near the Crenshaw Boulevard exit, I count seven of these "Adopt-a's" within just one mile: Adopt-a-Wall, Adopt-a-Wildflower, Adopt-a-Graffiti-Removal, etc. Driving to Santa Barbara on the Ventura Freeway, every two miles there's an "Adopt-a."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2008 | Richard Marosi
The San Diego Minutemen have filed a federal lawsuit against Caltrans, accusing the state agency of discrimination in its handling of the group's participation in the Adopt-A-Highway program. The California Department of Transportation last month decided to move the Minutemen from a stretch of I-5 near the U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint to a quieter, less visible state highway. Caltrans officials said the presence of the anti-illegal immigration group posed a safety risk because members could draw protesters during clean-ups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 8, 1992 | MAIA DAVIS, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The blue Adopt-A-Highway signs that have sprung up along California roads in the past three years usually feature the names of civic organizations or businesses, except for the occasional celebrity, such as Bette Midler. But the two blue signs that mark off a lonely, three-mile stretch of California 126 in Piru list only the simple, intriguing name of "Lilith."
MAGAZINE
September 1, 1996 | Darrell Satzman
Ever since it was launched by Caltrans in 1989, the Adopt-a-Highway program has been wildly popular among community organizations, businesses and individuals who help spiff up the roads while putting a shine on their public image. Waiting lists now run years to adopt heavily traveled stretches of popular highways, and to encourage even more would-be adopters, Caltrans has halved cleaning responsibilities: Now an adopter need spruce up only one side of a roadway.
OPINION
August 19, 2001
Re "Gays Seek Adopt-a-Highway Sign and Get Cold Shoulder," Aug. 15: I can understand why the Boy Scouts of America doesn't allow openly homosexual men into its leadership positions, and I can understand why most churches don't want gay marriages. But the South Dakota Department of Transportation is not a religious organization and therefore has no justification in denying the Sioux Empire Gay and Lesbian Coalition a roadside sign for its Adopt-a-Highway program. The department's reasoning is shallow and inconsistent, exposing its bigotry against--and ignorance of--homosexuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 6, 2008 | Richard Marosi
The San Diego Minutemen have filed a federal lawsuit against Caltrans, accusing the state agency of discrimination in its handling of the group's participation in the Adopt-A-Highway program. The California Department of Transportation last month decided to move the Minutemen from a stretch of I-5 near the U.S. Border Patrol checkpoint to a quieter, less visible state highway. Caltrans officials said the presence of the anti-illegal immigration group posed a safety risk because members could draw protesters during clean-ups.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 19, 2007 | David Reyes, Times Staff Writer
Frustrated that the state won't clean up its act, Anaheim will launch an effort to pick up the tons of trash littering the freeways and offramps that greet tourists headed to Disneyland and other city hot spots. City officials told the California Department of Transportation that the city would pitch in and also encourage local businesses and organizations to sign up for the Adopt-a-Highway program to keep the freeways clean.
TRAVEL
July 14, 2002 | SUSAN SPANO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
This summer, as more Americans hit the road for vacation, it seems appropriate to think about the scenic byways they'll be taking, like the Pacific Coast Highway in Big Sur and U.S. Highway 395 below the eastern flank of the High Sierra. To my mind, they aren't just roads through the state; they are routes to the heart. So it appalls me to think of people who despoil them by throwing cigarette butts, beer cans and hamburger wrappers out the window.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 11, 2002 | HUGO MARTIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Few people can honestly say they feel good about picking up dirty diapers, soiled condoms and used jugs of motor oil from the side of a road. But then again, few are as devoted to the environment as Yedvart Tchakerian. The retired businessman spends hours each week cleaning a busy stretch of Topanga Canyon Boulevard under the state's Adopt-a-Highway program.
OPINION
November 18, 2001
Time was when I felt kindly toward Adopt-a-Highway signs. They were a low-tech, homespun recognition of small citizen groups or a family doing their part. I imagined the kids, maybe the whole family, picking up litter on weekends. But what was once cute is now an emerging cultural disaster, with the usual corporations invading our every roadway with their advertising. On the Santa Monica Freeway near the Crenshaw Boulevard exit, I count seven of these "Adopt-a's" within just one mile: Adopt-a-Wall, Adopt-a-Wildflower, Adopt-a-Graffiti-Removal, etc. Driving to Santa Barbara on the Ventura Freeway, every two miles there's an "Adopt-a."
OPINION
August 19, 2001
Re "Gays Seek Adopt-a-Highway Sign and Get Cold Shoulder," Aug. 15: I can understand why the Boy Scouts of America doesn't allow openly homosexual men into its leadership positions, and I can understand why most churches don't want gay marriages. But the South Dakota Department of Transportation is not a religious organization and therefore has no justification in denying the Sioux Empire Gay and Lesbian Coalition a roadside sign for its Adopt-a-Highway program. The department's reasoning is shallow and inconsistent, exposing its bigotry against--and ignorance of--homosexuals.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 31, 1993 | CAROLINE LEMKE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Dear Street Smart: I've noticed signs on a number of freeways which say "Adopt-a-Freeway" and list some sponsor's name underneath. Will you please explain more about this concept? It sounds intriguing. Jerry Page Newport Beach The state began the Adopt-a-Highway program in 1989, and it has become so popular that there is now a waiting list of individuals, businesses and service organizations wanting to volunteer to pick up litter along freeways and highways.
NATIONAL
June 14, 2012 | By Laura J. Nelson
The Ku Klux Klan's reputation may be dirty, but it apparently likes clean highways. After the Georgia Department of Transportation rejected a local KKK chapter's Adopt-A-Highway application this week amid outrage from social activists, the group's leader cried foul and sought the help of the American Civil Liberties Union. "We just want to clean up the doggone road," Harley Hanson, 34, told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution. (His official title: exalted cyclops of the Realm of Georgia.)
NEWS
August 15, 2001 | ERIC SLATER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The practicing pagans of Salt Lake City keep an eye on 2.9 miles of state highway. The Ashland, Ore., Friends of John Denver chapter has a 2-mile stretch of Interstate 5. Nudists in Florida, Wiccans in New Jersey and the Ku Klux Klan of Missouri all have toiled to keep America clean through Adopt-a-Highway programs. So the Sioux Empire Gay and Lesbian Coalition of Sioux City, S.D.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 7, 2001
So the Supreme Court has allowed the Ku Klux Klan the right to advertise its participation in Missouri's "adopt-a-highway" litter clean-up program (March 6). I sure hope the Klan uses this opportunity to pick up something other than white trash. ALAN TOY Santa Monica
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