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NEWS
May 23, 1996 | GREGG ZOROYA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Conna Craig still has the willowy look of the abandoned child, slender and pale even as an adult, years from a childhood in California foster care, one of those "system kids" who survived. On this night, the illusion seems fitting as she humbly accepts adulation from 400 conservative intellectuals before upbraiding the nation's foster care system and offering a vision of dramatic reform.
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ENTERTAINMENT
February 5, 1996 | HOWARD ROSENBERG, TIMES TELEVISION CRITIC
ABC's new "Second Noah" is so determined to be genial that its first two episodes turn disharmony into bliss just in time for the closing credits. If only real life were as tidy. The slow and oozy ABC drama introduces another of TV's eclectic families, the ethnic rainbow in this instance being the Becketts of Tampa, Fla.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 5, 1995
Re your editorial, "Oh Baby, What a Mess Parents Make!" June 25: Times editors ask which is most important--bonding, heritage or stability for the child; you suggest stronger adoption laws. By law, we adoptees may not choose with whom we bond. By law, adoptees, as in the general population, are raised in homes that may initially appear stable but can become unstable. By law, adoptees are denied knowledge and access to their true heritage. What the legislators, courts and wanna-be adoption experts cannot manipulate or predict is our outcomes.
NEWS
November 13, 1994 | JENNIFER DIXON, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Adopted as a day-old infant, Linda Sargent Thompson has spent 20 years searching for her birth mother. She scans faces everywhere she goes, looking for a resemblance that will bring her closer to the family who can make her feel complete. For many adoptees and the parents who give them up, a reunion is a healing experience. Until they find each other, they say, there's a hole in their hearts. "Knowing who your brothers and sisters are, who your (birth) parents are, is a basic, basic human desire," said Bill Betzen, administrator of Catholic Counseling Services in Dallas.
NEWS
April 17, 1994 | JESSICA ANCKER, ASSOCIATED PRESS
About 30 Korean children stand in rows, punching and kicking to their martial arts instructor's count. Later, they cool down with a Korean folk song about a rabbit hopping across a field. After class, they're whisked into cars by a flock of parents--almost all of them Caucasian. Albany's Korean Language School, like dozens of others around the country, was established by the immigrant community as a way of passing on its traditions to an American-born generation.
NEWS
January 8, 1993 | R. DANIEL FOSTER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES; R. Daniel Foster writes regularly for Valley Life.
Armed with little more than her birth date and birthplace--Oct. 15, 1965, Van Nuys--Jacqui Ochoa has set out to find her mother. Furious at laws that prevent adoptees from accessing sealed adoption records, Ochoa has joined the Sunland-based chapter of the Adoptees Liberty Movement Assn. to seek support and guidance for her search.
NEWS
December 23, 1992 | MARLENE CIMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The health status of children adopted from Romania by American families reflects years of government-sanctioned neglect and abuse, placing them in a medically "high risk pediatric group," according to a study released Tuesday. Researchers studied 65 Romanian children now living in this country--children who came from among those considered the "most vital and attractive" available for adoption--and said that only 15% had been physically healthy and developmentally normal since their arrival.
NEWS
July 31, 1992 | ROBIN ABCARIAN
In most respects, Ben Cable-McCarthy's search for his birth mother was not that unusual. Although he was adopted and raised by loving parents, he began to have strong feelings as a teen-ager about the woman who gave him up. Who was she? Where was she? What does she look like? Does she think of me? Ten years would pass, however, before he would act on those feelings. In January, shortly before his 28th birthday, Cable-McCarthy made it his New Year's resolution to find her.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 17, 1992 | GEOFF BOUCHER, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
It was a reaction she has come to expect in supermarket checkout lines, but Sue Eaton was surprised to see it in a pediatrician. The doctor looked down at her newly adopted son, James, an infant with sightless eyes and an immobile, spastic body, and he cringed. Then the doctor asked why Eaton, the mother of four "normal" children, could take in a son that would require so much care and give so little back. "He really made no bones about it," Eaton, 51, recalled, looking at James, now 13.
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