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Adoptive Parents

NEWS
November 8, 1994 | DAVID G. SAVAGE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Supreme Court, refusing to intervene in a highly emotional dispute over the adoption of a 3-year-old Illinois boy, on Monday let stand a state court ruling that may send the child to live with the biological parents he does not know. Lawyers for both sets of parents said that the high court's action clears the way for another hearing to determine who finally will get custody of the boy known as "Baby Richard." An aide to Illinois Gov.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 26, 1994 | BOB POOL, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the blink of an eye, the Norman family doubled in size Wednesday. Four orphaned Russian girls stepped shyly from an airliner at Los Angeles International Airport, embraced their new mother for the first time and set off for a new life in La Habra Heights. "You're home," Patti Norman said quietly as she gazed at her daughters for the first time. The girls smiled and then, one by one, reached up to clutch her hands tightly.
NEWS
February 11, 2001 | DEBORAH HASTINGS, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Finally, the photograph arrives. And all that longing finds purchase. Here is your new child, though for now he is two-dimensional, a glossy image that grows soiled from fingertip caresses. The adoption agency is paid--$10,000, $15,000, $20,000--whatever it takes. The future is an airline ticket to Moscow clasped in your hand. After 10 hours on the plane, sleepless and senseless, you step haltingly into a warehouse of children. Here, in real-life glory, stands your child. Blond hair.
NEWS
May 7, 1995 | SHARON COHEN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
In 16 years, Tony has been a son, an adopted son, a foster son--and a headline. At age 5, Tony and his younger brother, Sam, were put up for adoption by their drug-abusing mother. By then, Tony had been in and out of foster homes, and there were suspicions that some relatives had sexually abused him. At age 10, Tony made news. His adoptive parents, who had reared him nearly half his life, decided they could no longer handle his emotional problems. They also said he had struck, cut and tried to drown his 8-year-old brother.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 7, 1995 | JAMES RAINEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A dwindling Native American tribe clinging to its culture and two adoptive parents clinging to their children faced off Tuesday in a Monterey Park courtroom in an emotional child custody hearing that promises to become a touch point for debate over adoption, Indian sovereignty and children's rights.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 4, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - Gov. Jerry Brown signed legislation Friday that will allow children in California to have more than two legal parents, a measure opposed by some conservative groups as an attack on the traditional family. Sen. Mark Leno (D-San Francisco) said he authored the measure to address the changes in family structure in California, including situations in which same-sex couples have a child with an opposite-sex biological parent. The law will allow the courts to recognize three or more legal parents so that custody and financial responsibility can be shared by all those involved in raising a child, Leno said.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 11, 1993 | ALAN ABRAHAMSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
What Leanne Dees did to the emotions of desperately vulnerable people is so unacceptable it was criminal. She knows that now. "I messed up," she said from jail. She promised to give up her unborn children to would-be adoptive parents, several in Southern California, in exchange for living expenses while pregnant. The problem was that she made those promises to different sets of prospective parents at the same time.
WORLD
September 20, 2009 | Barbara Demick
The man from family planning liked to prowl around the mountaintop village, looking for diapers on clotheslines and listening for the cry of a hungry newborn. One day in the spring of 2004, he presented himself at Yang Shuiying's doorstep and commanded: "Bring out the baby." Yang wept and argued, but, alone with her 4-month-old daughter, she was in no position to resist the man every parent in Tianxi feared. "I'm going to sell the baby for foreign adoption. I can get a lot of money for her," he told the sobbing mother as he drove her with the baby to an orphanage in Zhenyuan, a nearby city in the southern province of Guizhou.
OPINION
April 18, 2011
In Congress and the courts, supporters of gay rights are attacking the Defense of Marriage Act, which among other things allows states to refuse to recognize same-sex marriages performed in other states. But there is no law that gives states a similar ability to reject another state's adoption. That's why we're puzzled by a ruling issued last week by the U.S. 5th Circuit Court of Appeals, which held that Louisiana rightly refused to issue a birth certificate including both names of a gay couple who adopted a child.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 16, 1990 | MICHAEL CONNELLY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Pregnant with her seventh child, Leanne Dees answered a classified ad in an Arkansas newspaper and, according to a Los Angeles woman, entered into a non-binding agreement to let her adopt the child. The excited adoptive mother-to-be, Debbie Freeman, brought Dees and her husband, Frankie, and their 1-year-old daughter to Van Nuys and paid $9,400 to support them for six months in a furnished apartment, she said.
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