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HEALTH
August 13, 2011 | By Amanda Mascarelli, HealthKey
People with attention deficit hyperactivity disorder sometimes outgrow the condition. But more often than not, the symptoms linger into adulthood. A 2006 study in Psychological Medicine found that about 65% of patients retain at least partial symptoms of the condition when they grow up. But only about 10% of adults with ADHD are treated and diagnosed, says Russell A. Barkley, a clinical professor of psychiatry at the Medical University of South Carolina...
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SCIENCE
January 15, 2014 | By Melissa Healy
Adolescents treated with the antidepressant fluoxetine -- better known by its commercial name, Prozac -- appear to undergo changes in brain signaling that result in changed behavior well into adulthood, says a new study. Adult mice and rats who were administered Prozac for a stretch of mid-adolescence responded to daunting social and physical challenges with less despair than animals who passed their teen years unmedicated, a team of researchers found. But, even as adults long separated from their antidepressant days, the Prozac veterans reacted to stressful situations with greater anxiety than did the adult Prozac virgins.
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NEWS
November 16, 2011 | By Jeannine Stein, Los Angeles Times / For the Booster Shots blog
Fat kids often turn into fat adults with a host of related health problems: diabetes, high blood pressure, clogged arteries. But a study finds that if those heavy kids lose weight they may be on a par with people who were never overweight. A meta-analysis released today in the New England Journal of Medicine looked at weight status and health among 6,328 people who were followed from childhood for an average of 23 years. The study subjects were divided into four categories: those who were normal weight as kids and not obese as adults; those who were overweight or obese as kids but not obese as adults; those who were overweight or obese as kids and obese as adults, and those who were normal weight as kids but obese as adults.
OPINION
October 20, 2013
Re “Boosting young men of color,” Opinion, Oct. 17 Author Robert Ross eloquently articulates an issue that Angelenos have blatantly ignored for too long. The life challenges of our young men of color are distressing on many levels, and they continue to cry for help and hope. The $50-million investment from the California Endowment is a generous investment, but solving this problem will require everyone to play an active role in investing in our young men. Tyrone Howard Los Angeles The writer is the director of the UCLA Black Male Institute.
NEWS
April 18, 1997
In "Adulthood? Later, Dude!" (March 21) you feature a picture of a 22-year-old woman, a self-supporting USC student, sitting on a bench with a lit cigarette in her hand. With her quote, "Adulthood means being true to yourself--no longer depending on others"--this looks like an endorsement for cigarette smoking. LAURA WACO Tarzana Adults are boring. They have to be too responsible and worry about things--like 24-year-olds who still live at home. PAUL STRENGEL Claremont
HEALTH
November 9, 2010 | By Melissa Healy, Los Angeles Times
Some adolescent memories ? prom dates, fashion choices, Facebook postings ? tend to fade and, mercifully, disappear in the transition to adulthood. But a study released Tuesday finds that one increasingly common source of teen angst ? obesity ? has a cruel knack for following adolescents into their adult years, then tightening its grip. The result not only confers profound health risks for teens whose excess weight follows them and accelerates into adulthood, it also spells a looming public health disaster in a country where almost 1 in 5 adolescents is obese, experts say. By the time they reach their late 20s to early 30s, people who were obese between 12 and 21 are more than seven times more likely than normal-weight or overweight peers to develop severe obesity ?
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1996 | FRANK B. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Turning 18 is the big moment for teenagers. They gain the right to vote, the right to finance a car. Even the right to marry without permission. And the right to be sued. To be drafted. To go to an adult prison or be executed. Maybe the soon-to-be-ex-kids need an owner's manual, something to explain all the legal ramifications of that big birthday. That's what Margaret Hampton of Calabasas thought when she began distributing a free booklet called "When You Become 18."
ENTERTAINMENT
August 7, 2010 | By Gary Goldstein, Special to the Los Angeles Times
Although nicely acted and directed, "Cemetery Junction" is a thoroughly unremarkable coming-of-age dramedy that's barely distinguished by its 1973 England setting or by its name supporting cast. Not surprisingly, the film will be on DVD shelves mid-month. Co-written and co-directed by frequent collaborators Ricky Gervais and Stephen Merchant ("The Office," HBO's "Extras"), this memory piece nominally revolves around a mismatched trio of 20-ish mates navigating young adulthood in their working-class suburb of Cemetery Junction, a town that seems way more acceptable than its crummy reputation here implies.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
NW A Novel Zadie Smith Penguin: 416 pp., $26.95 Zadie Smith's fourth novel, "NW," is a return of sorts to the voices and the northwest London landscape of her 2000 debut, "White Teeth. " Like that book, it is exuberant, lush with language, concerned with the relationship of people to their city, with framing not just the lives of characters but also an entire social milieu. And yet, it is more than that, a real sign of how Smith has developed and grown. "White Teeth," after all, was the work of a young writer - Smith was 24 when it was published - and it was marked by a young writer's excess, a young writer's lack of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Fragile and romantic, the well-acted Belgian coming-of-age drama "North Sea Texas" depicts the tentative steps from friendship to love that consume a lonely 14-year-old boy in a small coastal town. Gay, introverted and neglected by his accordion-playing barfly of a single mom, Pim (Jelle Florizoone) takes comfort in private rituals (drawing, washing himself, dressing up) and a box of collected objects that pertain to his crush: outgoing neighbor boy Gino (Mathias Vergels) who's a few years older.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Seven-year-old Hannah Thome munched on a chocolate cookie after getting home from cheerleading camp last week and mulled the question, brow furrowing over her wide blue eyes. Did she want to be older? "No," the Tustin youngster concluded. "I like being a kid. You get to do more things. " Her mother remembers Tom Hanks wishing for adulthood in the 1988 film "Big" and remembers wishing for the same. But childhood has changed a lot since then. And that might be changing how kids think about it. Kids today are increasingly likely to say they like being kids, a survey shows.
ENTERTAINMENT
June 27, 2013 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
Susan Choi's fourth novel, "My Education," is a tricky book to categorize. On the one hand, it's a campus novel, narrated by Regina Gottlieb, a graduate student in literature who falls under the sway of a charismatic professor and his wife at a university a lot like Cornell in the early 1990s. At the same time, this is just the background against which the larger story unfolds. What Choi - a Guggenheim fellow whose 2004 novel "American Woman" was a Pulitzer finalist - is after is the elusive territory of experience, the way people and events imprint us when we're young and then linger, exerting a subtle pressure over how we live our lives.
SPORTS
May 28, 2013 | By Sam Farmer, Los Angeles Times
ENGLEWOOD, Colo. — Peyton Manning has had dozens of signature moments in his football career that the outside world didn't witness. Since childhood, Manning has jotted handwritten thank-you notes, and for years he has maintained a tradition of sending them to various NFL players retiring from the game. "I don't know who qualifies for a letter, necessarily," Manning said. "It's probably just somebody I played against for a long time. I don't have to know you real well. The other guys on my list now, I've got [Baltimore center]
SCIENCE
March 3, 2013 | By Geoffrey Mohan, Los Angeles Times
Childhood attention deficit hyperactivity disorder frequently persists into adulthood, bringing heightened risks of additional psychiatric issues and nearly five times the risk of suicide, according to a 20-year study that followed children diagnosed with the disorder. The study, to be published Monday in the journal Pediatrics, is the most extensive to date establishing links between childhood and adult ADHD, and between adult ADHD and other mental health diagnoses. Only about 38% of those who had ADHD as children made it to age 27 without either continued ADHD symptoms or at least one other psychiatric disorder, according to the study, which was based on a sample of more than 5,000 people born between Jan. 1, 1976, and Dec. 31, 1982.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In late August, baby boomers (and others whose teen years were spent in a haze of marijuana smoke) seemed to get the comeuppance they had long feared: A study suggested that early and frequent pot smoking resulted in depressed intelligence scores well into adulthood. But a new analysis suggests that in assigning blame for the lower IQ scores they found, the authors of that study may themselves have gotten caught in a haze of confusion. Social and economic disadvantage in youth -- a factor that predisposes kids to early marijuana use as well as to adult lives that suppress intelligence scores -- may explain the earlier findings, asserts a Norwegian economist writing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
November 1, 2012 | By Robert Abele
Fragile and romantic, the well-acted Belgian coming-of-age drama "North Sea Texas" depicts the tentative steps from friendship to love that consume a lonely 14-year-old boy in a small coastal town. Gay, introverted and neglected by his accordion-playing barfly of a single mom, Pim (Jelle Florizoone) takes comfort in private rituals (drawing, washing himself, dressing up) and a box of collected objects that pertain to his crush: outgoing neighbor boy Gino (Mathias Vergels) who's a few years older.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 21, 2013 | By Emily Alpert
Seven-year-old Hannah Thome munched on a chocolate cookie after getting home from cheerleading camp last week and mulled the question, brow furrowing over her wide blue eyes. Did she want to be older? "No," the Tustin youngster concluded. "I like being a kid. You get to do more things. " Her mother remembers Tom Hanks wishing for adulthood in the 1988 film "Big" and remembers wishing for the same. But childhood has changed a lot since then. And that might be changing how kids think about it. Kids today are increasingly likely to say they like being kids, a survey shows.
NEWS
January 15, 2013 | By Melissa Healy
In late August, baby boomers (and others whose teen years were spent in a haze of marijuana smoke) seemed to get the comeuppance they had long feared: A study suggested that early and frequent pot smoking resulted in depressed intelligence scores well into adulthood. But a new analysis suggests that in assigning blame for the lower IQ scores they found, the authors of that study may themselves have gotten caught in a haze of confusion. Social and economic disadvantage in youth -- a factor that predisposes kids to early marijuana use as well as to adult lives that suppress intelligence scores -- may explain the earlier findings, asserts a Norwegian economist writing this week in the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.
ENTERTAINMENT
September 16, 2012 | By David L. Ulin, Los Angeles Times Book Critic
NW A Novel Zadie Smith Penguin: 416 pp., $26.95 Zadie Smith's fourth novel, "NW," is a return of sorts to the voices and the northwest London landscape of her 2000 debut, "White Teeth. " Like that book, it is exuberant, lush with language, concerned with the relationship of people to their city, with framing not just the lives of characters but also an entire social milieu. And yet, it is more than that, a real sign of how Smith has developed and grown. "White Teeth," after all, was the work of a young writer - Smith was 24 when it was published - and it was marked by a young writer's excess, a young writer's lack of control.
ENTERTAINMENT
May 24, 2012
STAGE Long before "Sideways" was a hit Alexander Payne movie, it was an adored novel by Rex Pickett. Now it gets a stage treatment in this adaptation of the story of two guys cruising through wine country as they confront the rest of their adulthood. Ruskin Group Theatre, 3000 Airport Ave., Santa Monica. Fri.-July 8. $25. ruskingrouptheatre.com.
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