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Advanced Bionics Company

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BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The folks at Advanced Bionics aren't modest when it comes to their goals. They want to help the deaf hear, the blind see and the paralyzed regain the use of their arms and legs. Lofty, perhaps. But with technology advancing at breathtaking speed, employees at the Sylmar company believe their aspirations are within range. They're gearing up to be next century's leaders in neurostimulation.
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BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it wanted to fine Advanced Bionics, a Sylmar-based maker of cochlear implant hearing aids, $2.2 million for alleged manufacturing violations that put patients at risk. The FDA accused Advanced Bionics of failing to follow manufacturing standards to ensure the safety and quality of the hearing aids.
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BUSINESS
August 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Boston Scientific Corp. on Thursday said it had amended terms of its 2004 acquisition of a maker of implantable electronic medical devices, a deal that led the acquired firm's founder to sue over Boston Scientific's attempts to fire him. The agreement reduces the potential payout Boston Scientific faces in its acquisition of Advanced Bionics Corp.
BUSINESS
August 10, 2007 | From the Associated Press
Boston Scientific Corp. on Thursday said it had amended terms of its 2004 acquisition of a maker of implantable electronic medical devices, a deal that led the acquired firm's founder to sue over Boston Scientific's attempts to fire him. The agreement reduces the potential payout Boston Scientific faces in its acquisition of Advanced Bionics Corp.
BUSINESS
March 29, 2008 | From Reuters
The Food and Drug Administration said Friday that it wanted to fine Advanced Bionics, a Sylmar-based maker of cochlear implant hearing aids, $2.2 million for alleged manufacturing violations that put patients at risk. The FDA accused Advanced Bionics of failing to follow manufacturing standards to ensure the safety and quality of the hearing aids.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | BOB HOWARD
Medical device manufacturer Advanced Bionics Inc. agreed to buy 25 acres of land at the North Campus at Rye Canyon Business Park in Valencia for $9.5 million. It also signed a six-year, $5.5-million lease for 122,579 square feet of office and research space at the business park. The company plans to relocate to Valencia from its headquarters in Sylmar.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Advanced Bionics Corp., a medical device company controlled by Los Angeles businessman Alfred E. Mann, agreed Tuesday to be acquired by industry giant Boston Scientific Corp. Based in Valencia, Advanced Bionics develops miniature devices for deafness, pain and neurological disorders. Mann, 78, is a former aerospace entrepreneur who has made a fortune building and then selling biomedical firms.
BUSINESS
June 2, 2004 | Denise Gellene, Times Staff Writer
Advanced Bionics Corp., a medical device company controlled by Los Angeles businessman Alfred E. Mann, agreed Tuesday to be acquired by industry giant Boston Scientific Corp. Based in Valencia, Advanced Bionics develops miniature devices for deafness, pain and neurological disorders. Mann, 78, is a former aerospace entrepreneur who has made a fortune building and then selling biomedical firms.
BUSINESS
September 19, 2000 | BOB HOWARD
Medical device manufacturer Advanced Bionics Inc. agreed to buy 25 acres of land at the North Campus at Rye Canyon Business Park in Valencia for $9.5 million. It also signed a six-year, $5.5-million lease for 122,579 square feet of office and research space at the business park. The company plans to relocate to Valencia from its headquarters in Sylmar.
BUSINESS
October 1, 1997 | DIANE SEO, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
The folks at Advanced Bionics aren't modest when it comes to their goals. They want to help the deaf hear, the blind see and the paralyzed regain the use of their arms and legs. Lofty, perhaps. But with technology advancing at breathtaking speed, employees at the Sylmar company believe their aspirations are within range. They're gearing up to be next century's leaders in neurostimulation.
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