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Advanced Micro Devices Inc

BUSINESS
March 2, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Google Inc. is switching its servers to run on Advanced Micro Devices Inc. chips instead of those made by Intel Corp., according to a Morgan Stanley report. Google, which has more than 200,000 servers, has started to buy Advanced Micro's Opteron processors with almost all new purchases, Morgan Stanley analyst Mark Edelstone said. He raised his earnings estimates for Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Advanced Micro.
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BUSINESS
January 4, 2006 | From Bloomberg News
Rambus Inc. said Advanced Micro Devices Inc. would pay $75 million to license its patents. Rambus shares rose 12%. The five-year contract covers patents used to increase the connection speed of computer chips and in the design of controllers and high-speed memory, Los Altos, Calif.-based Rambus said. The agreement is a sign that Rambus, after years of court battles, is making progress generating sales to expand its product lines. Shares of Rambus rose $2.01 to $18.20. Shares of Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
October 12, 2005 | From Bloomberg News
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. said Tuesday that third-quarter profit rose 73% because of sales of chips used in laptop and server computers. Net income rose to $76 million, or 18 cents a share, from $43.85 million, or 12 cents, a year ago, the Sunnyvale, Calif.-based company said. Sales in the quarter ended Sept. 25 increased 23% to $1.52 billion from $1.24 billion. AMD, the No.
BUSINESS
September 2, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
The chips are down in Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s antitrust lawsuit against Intel Corp. Two months after AMD sued its Bay Area archrival, Intel on Thursday fired back with a blistering response that claims AMD's own stumbles in marketing and technology are to blame for its small share of the global market for computer chips.
BUSINESS
July 19, 2005 | From Associated Press
Four of the world's largest computer chip makers and New York state said Monday that they would spend $600 million over the next five years on a research, education and economic development project focused on creating the next generation of computer microchips while limiting costs. The project will get $200 million in funding and equipment from Armonk, N.Y.-based IBM Corp., Sunnyvale, Calif.-based Advanced Micro Devices Inc.
BUSINESS
July 14, 2005 | From Associated Press
Advanced Micro Devices Inc.'s second-quarter profit on Wednesday fell 65% but beat Wall Street expectations as the chip maker reported record microprocessor sales. AMD said processor sales rose 38% from a year earlier, while revenue at its division that makes flash memory for cellular phones and other devices slumped 31%. AMD plans to spin off the flash memory business in a public offering. For the period ended June 26, AMD earned $11.3 million, or 3 cents a share, on sales of $1.26 billion.
BUSINESS
June 29, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. sued archrival Intel Corp., accusing the world's largest chip maker of bullying computer companies and employing other illegal tactics to gain a stranglehold on the world semiconductor market. The 48-page antitrust lawsuit filed in U.S. District Court in Delaware late Monday claims that Intel uses discounts, kickbacks and threats of cutting off business to maintain its 80% share of the $28-billion computer processor market.
BUSINESS
June 28, 2005 | From Reuters
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. on Monday unveiled its most expensive consumer processor, a $1,031 chip for video game enthusiasts that highlights AMD's new plan to market itself as a technology leader, not a cheap alternative to rival Intel Corp. The chip, called the Athlon 64 FX-57, costs more than what many people pay for an entire personal computer. Gamers, looking for ever more detailed graphics and speed, tend to spend freely on the cutting-edge technology.
BUSINESS
May 31, 2005 | From Associated Press
Advanced Micro Devices Inc. is set to launch its first PC microprocessors with two computing engines on a single chip today, expanding its product line with a technology that is expected to be a major driver of personal computer performance for years to come. The four dual-core chips to be unveiled at the Computex trade show in Taiwan are targeted at high-end personal computers used for advanced tasks such as creating or editing digital media. In April, Sunnyvale, Calif.
BUSINESS
April 21, 2005 | Terril Yue Jones, Times Staff Writer
Intel Corp. and Advanced Micro Devices Inc. this week begin a new round in their fight to be first with cutting-edge technology: Both companies are introducing dual-core microprocessors that can crunch data faster than traditional chips. AMD is expected today to announce its dual-core chips for server computers, which run large corporate computer systems. Intel on Monday introduced dual-core Pentium desktop chips.
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