Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAdventure Playground
IN THE NEWS

Adventure Playground

FEATURED ARTICLES
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
Tucked away in a small corner of Central Park not far from the Central Library is Adventure Playground, a place where youngsters build forts, ride rafts over an 18-inch-deep pond and slide down a hill into a mud pit. There are no Ninja Turtles, organized sports or computers--just lots of opportunities to be creative and get dirty. Kids who can't think of the proper name call it Huck Finn Park or Mud Park.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2005 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
In the thick of a county teeming with small manicured lawns, tiny backyards and highly regimented activities for children, there's a little piece of summers gone by in Huntington Beach. It's where children, their clothes stained by mud, raft on slabs of plywood around a small muddy pond. They slide down a plastic tarp into another smaller, muddy pool. They zoom precariously on a tire, down a cable. They work with hammers, nails and blunt saws on treehouses.
Advertisement
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992
Parents who support the city's Adventure Playground will hold their first fund-raising event Saturday, selling chili, hot dogs, soft drinks and snacks during the playground's annual open house. Money raised in the food sales will be turned over to the city to help operate the "vacant lot"-type playground at University Community Park, said Michael Howard, treasurer of the recently formed Irvine Adventure Play Assn. Last year, the city considered closing the playground to help balance the budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996
Nine-year-old Kristin Buettner winced as she was squirted with cold water from a hose, then slid down a hill covered in plastic and plopped into a big puddle of mud. With the grime streaking her face, Kristin quickly scooted out of the water and exclaimed, "I like getting dirty!" That is the sentiment of just about every kid who visits Adventure Playground at Huntington Central Park, next to the Central Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
For a 9-year-old, Jeffrey Voeltner has lofty aspirations. He likes to build freestyle forts out of scrap lumber and dreams of being an architect. But the City of Fullerton is cramping his style. For three years, the youngster has participated in a summer program called Adventure Playground in which children build clubhouses and play in muddy water slides. Now, city officials have decided to end the program.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
Dale Aigner's 9-year-old son, Jason, has been a regular at the city's Adventure Playground ever since he turned 6, the playground's minimum age. "If we don't have anything planned on Saturday, trust me, he'd be there all day long," said Aigner, 48, who owns a print shop in Fountain Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 8, 2005 | Jennifer Delson, Times Staff Writer
In the thick of a county teeming with small manicured lawns, tiny backyards and highly regimented activities for children, there's a little piece of summers gone by in Huntington Beach. It's where children, their clothes stained by mud, raft on slabs of plywood around a small muddy pond. They slide down a plastic tarp into another smaller, muddy pool. They zoom precariously on a tire, down a cable. They work with hammers, nails and blunt saws on treehouses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 25, 1996
Nine-year-old Kristin Buettner winced as she was squirted with cold water from a hose, then slid down a hill covered in plastic and plopped into a big puddle of mud. With the grime streaking her face, Kristin quickly scooted out of the water and exclaimed, "I like getting dirty!" That is the sentiment of just about every kid who visits Adventure Playground at Huntington Central Park, next to the Central Library.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
For the past 10 years, the Adventure Playground at Hurless Barton Park has been a youthful equivalent of a construction site. The two-acre playground, an expanse of trees, dirt, water and mud, was a popular place for children to spend the summer experiencing the old-fashioned fun of building treehouses and constructing water slides. Today, the tools being used there aren't hammers and saws but bulldozers and grading equipment. And the building underway is for a community center, not treehouses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
There is only a chain-link fence separating the playground and grassy knolls at Hurless Barton Park in Yorba Linda from an adjacent dirt lot, but they might as well be in different counties. With its swings, slides and playing fields, Barton Park has an ordinary suburban playground. Next door at Adventure Playground, kids tramp around in dirt, the only swing is a cable that dips perilously close to a mud pit, and the so-called "Slide of Doom" ends in a murky pond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 1, 1993 | ROBERT BARKER
Tucked away in a small corner of Central Park not far from the Central Library is Adventure Playground, a place where youngsters build forts, ride rafts over an 18-inch-deep pond and slide down a hill into a mud pit. There are no Ninja Turtles, organized sports or computers--just lots of opportunities to be creative and get dirty. Kids who can't think of the proper name call it Huck Finn Park or Mud Park.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 24, 1992 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
For the past 10 years, the Adventure Playground at Hurless Barton Park has been a youthful equivalent of a construction site. The two-acre playground, an expanse of trees, dirt, water and mud, was a popular place for children to spend the summer experiencing the old-fashioned fun of building treehouses and constructing water slides. Today, the tools being used there aren't hammers and saws but bulldozers and grading equipment. And the building underway is for a community center, not treehouses.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 26, 1992
Parents who support the city's Adventure Playground will hold their first fund-raising event Saturday, selling chili, hot dogs, soft drinks and snacks during the playground's annual open house. Money raised in the food sales will be turned over to the city to help operate the "vacant lot"-type playground at University Community Park, said Michael Howard, treasurer of the recently formed Irvine Adventure Play Assn. Last year, the city considered closing the playground to help balance the budget.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 12, 1991 | DANIELLE A. FOUQUETTE
There is only a chain-link fence separating the playground and grassy knolls at Hurless Barton Park in Yorba Linda from an adjacent dirt lot, but they might as well be in different counties. With its swings, slides and playing fields, Barton Park has an ordinary suburban playground. Next door at Adventure Playground, kids tramp around in dirt, the only swing is a cable that dips perilously close to a mud pit, and the so-called "Slide of Doom" ends in a murky pond.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 13, 1991 | TOM McQUEENEY
Dale Aigner's 9-year-old son, Jason, has been a regular at the city's Adventure Playground ever since he turned 6, the playground's minimum age. "If we don't have anything planned on Saturday, trust me, he'd be there all day long," said Aigner, 48, who owns a print shop in Fountain Valley.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 13, 1986 | RAY PEREZ, Times Staff Writer
For a 9-year-old, Jeffrey Voeltner has lofty aspirations. He likes to build freestyle forts out of scrap lumber and dreams of being an architect. But the City of Fullerton is cramping his style. For three years, the youngster has participated in a summer program called Adventure Playground in which children build clubhouses and play in muddy water slides. Now, city officials have decided to end the program.
NEWS
July 1, 1992 | JAY BERMAN, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
If it's summertime in Huntington Beach, you can be sure things are going to get dirty. This, of course, has nothing to do with local politics, but rather with the annual opening of Adventure Playground, a 1.5-acre corner of Huntington Central Park best known for its mud slide and Huck Finn-style rafting pond. "Kids are always being told to stay clean and keep out of anything dirty," says Kim White, 23, director of the playground. "This is the only time they're allowed to be dirty."
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 10, 1999 | James Meier, (714) 966-5988
The Parks and Recreation Department is accepting summer job applications. Positions requiring 20 to 30 hours of work per week will be available at the Tommy Lasorda Jr. Field House, Travis Ranch Activity Center and Adventure Playground. Those interested in working with kids and assisting with adult sports leagues are encouraged to apply by March 26. Information: (714) 961-7160.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|