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NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg and Robin Abcarian
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Mitt Romney took up the cudgels again against Russia on Monday, telling a radio interviewer that “almost everything we try to do globally, they try and oppose.” He accused President Obama, once again, of going soft on his Russian counterparts. The Obama campaign has ridiculed Romney for saying earlier this year that Russia was “without question, our No. 1 geopolitical foe.” Asked about that during a telephone interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, Romney neither repeated his claim nor backed down from it. “Russia is a geopolitical adversary, meaning that almost everything we try to do globally they try and oppose,” he said.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 18, 2014 | By Lee Romney
SAN FRANCISCO - For decades, former eight-term Bay Area Rep. Paul N. "Pete" McCloskey Jr. has dreamed of a Korean War battle moment he cannot shake: Peering into a trench he sees the terrified faces of his teenage opponents, clutching wicker baskets full of grenades. He empties his weapon. Last week, at 86, he at last had an opportunity for personal reconciliation. As a member of a small delegation led by Donald Gregg, a former U.S. ambassador to South Korea, McCloskey traveled to Pyongyang with a singular intention.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1999
Re "Proposed Boost in U.S. Defense Budget Would Benefit State," Jan. 5: I'm saddened to see my hard-earned tax dollars being squandered to build up our already awesome military machine. With the demise of the Soviet Union and the evil empire leaving the United States the only remaining superpower, who's left to challenge us? Every nation is hopelessly outclassed by America's Army, Navy and Air Force. The United States has the power to obliterate any adversary or combination of adversaries within minutes.
WORLD
August 27, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
WASHINGTON - The type of limited, punitive military campaign now being contemplated against Syria has failed to deter U.S. adversaries in the past, and at times emboldened them, military analysts say. In two major episodes in 1998, the U.S. government unleashed a combination of bombs and cruise missiles against its foes - Osama bin Laden's Al Qaeda and Saddam Hussein's government in Iraq. In a more distant third case, in 1986, the U.S. bombed Moammar Kadafi's Libya. The bombs and missiles mostly hit their targets, and the U.S. military at the time declared the attacks successful.
SPORTS
July 15, 1987 | Associated Press
The original 13 rules of golf, as drawn up by the Company of Gentlemen Golfers in 1744: "Articles & Laws in Playing at Golf-- "1. You must Tee your Ball, within a Club's length of the Hole. "2. Your Tee must be upon the Ground. "3. You are not to change the Ball which you Stroke off the Tee. "4. You are not to remove Stones, Bones or any Break Club, for the sake of playing your Ball, Except upon the fair Green & that only within a Club's length of your Ball. "5.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 29, 1987 | RAY PRICE, Ray Price, a New York-based writer, was the chief speech writer for President Richard M. Nixon.
With his State of the Union Address, did President Reagan put the Iran affair behind him? No. Did he do what he had to do to start putting his presidency back together again? Yes. Does he still have a tough road ahead as he continues to fight his way back? Yes. It was never in the cards that this, or any other single speech, would by itself restore the President's diminished authority. The damage has been too great for that.
SPORTS
July 27, 1986 | BOB OATES, Times Staff Writer
Three decades ago when a medical doctor named Bobby Brown was playing third base for the New York Yankees, the only adversaries he and his teammates knew were the seven other teams in the American League. "Twelve or 15 writers traveled with us all the time, and we didn't have an adversary relationship with any of them," Brown recalled the other day. "(Manager) Casey Stengel used to call them, 'My writers.' " Today's managers don't use that expression much.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1989
On June 28, the State Department confirmed a report that the U.S. ambassador to Tunisia, who since last December has been talking with representatives of the Palestine Liberation Organization, had recently upgraded the sessions by meeting with Salah Khalaf, the PLO's No. 2 man. That same day, as it happened, Khalaf was indicted in Italy for supplying guns in the 1970s to the Red Brigade, the terrorist band whose crimes include murdering former Prime Minister Aldo Moro and kidnaping U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 14, 1991
My cynical belief is that Jay Rosen never spent a day as a working journalist ("Cynicism Works--If You're Bogart," Commentary, May 30). To offer a comparative perspective on journalism, based on fantasies in which "Saturday Night Live" finds parody material out of the Gulf War news briefings and Humphrey Bogart's beloved fictional portrayals of the cynic, is mind-boggling. Has journalism failed so miserably it is now compared to fantasy? Analysis of the Gulf War coverage, in which admittedly the press looked bad, demands a much more comprehensive examination.
OPINION
October 7, 2005
Just one question: In his speech to the National Endowment for Democracy on Thursday, President Bush compared the despicable Iraqi terrorists to those terrible old despicable Communists. If those terrible old Communists are so despicable, exactly how is it that we are Red China's biggest debtor and biggest importer? I guess this is how we really fight that old despicable communism. DAVID FELSER Marina del Rey Once again the president is stirring the pot and using "classified" information that may be as accurate as what got us into the Iraqi mess in the first place.
WORLD
June 20, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Mark Magnier, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Even as Afghan President Hamid Karzai this week canceled security negotiations with the Obama administration and suspended his involvement in the U.S. attempt to revive peace talks with the Taliban, the insurgents made some political moves as fleet-footed as some of their guerrilla tactics, analysts said. This comes as Afghanistan's neighbors rethink how their interests would be affected by a political reconciliation involving the Taliban, as much of a long shot as that seems.
OPINION
April 24, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Bad news, apparently, for mayoral candidate Wendy Greuel: She has broad support from public employee unions in her race against Eric Garcetti. Let's run through that again. Greuel has the direct backing of the Los Angeles County Federation of Labor and the largest city civilian employee organization, the Service Employees International Union, Local 721, both of which can and do spend millions of dollars and mobilize thousands of members to support their candidates. She also has the backing of the union representing Department of Water and Power workers and of the Los Angeles Police Protective League, which represents most city police officers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 6, 2013 | By Anna Gorman, Los Angeles Times
One by one, the diabetic patients reluctantly stepped on the scale in the basement of a South Los Angeles clinic. Nearby, a nurse scribbled numbers on a chart. Camara January, 31, her round face framed by a sparkly headband, held her breath. The number stopped at 245 pounds. "That's not good," January said. Tracy Donald, 45, stepped up. Just under 240 pounds. "That is wrong," she said. Ramon Marquez, 62, tall and clean-shaven, methodically took off his watch, his cap and his shoes.
SPORTS
December 28, 2012
Earlier in the week I angrily wrote in about the Daily Trojan (a.k.a. L.A. Times) and the above-the-fold article with a huge picture of Matt Barkley and a below-the-fold, tiny article and picture on UCLA and Johnathan Franklin. Matt Barkley didn't even participate in the article on himself. On Christmas Day, I disgustedly wrote in again about the huge article and picture on Marqise Lee/USC and the tiny article on UCLA. Another nice gift to the Trojans. Well, after driving to San Diego to watch the Holiday Bowl, I profusely apologize for my previous missteps.
WORLD
November 21, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
RAWALPINDI, Pakistan - Inam ul Rahiem has made himself a nettlesome adversary of Pakistan's powerful military. The lawyer and retired army colonel has represented families who claim their loved ones have been secretly abducted by security forces. More recently, he has taken on Gen. Ashfaq Kayani with a legal claim that the army chief must step down because he has reached retirement age. Now Rahiem says the military is firing back with not-so-subtle salvos. A week ago, he was beaten badly near army headquarters in Rawalpindi by a band of thugs who pummeled him with bamboo sticks and shouted, "What are you doing, filing all these petitions against us?"
NEWS
September 10, 2012 | By Mitchell Landsberg and Robin Abcarian
LAKE FOREST, Ill. -- Mitt Romney took up the cudgels again against Russia on Monday, telling a radio interviewer that “almost everything we try to do globally, they try and oppose.” He accused President Obama, once again, of going soft on his Russian counterparts. The Obama campaign has ridiculed Romney for saying earlier this year that Russia was “without question, our No. 1 geopolitical foe.” Asked about that during a telephone interview with conservative radio host Hugh Hewitt, Romney neither repeated his claim nor backed down from it. “Russia is a geopolitical adversary, meaning that almost everything we try to do globally they try and oppose,” he said.
BOOKS
August 12, 1990
by LAWRENCE KEARNEY It's early March, Eisenhower still president, & Mother's heating up supper for the third time tonight. We're at the table doing homework, & she tells us Father's next in line for foreman, that today he'll know for sure. He's three hours late. Half past eight the Chevy screeches into the carport. For a minute, nothing. Then the sudden slam, & the thump downstairs to the basement.
WORLD
November 22, 2011 | By Ruth Sherlock, Los Angeles Times
Libya's interim prime minister on Tuesday unveiled a new Cabinet apparently assembled with an eye to subduing regional factions, which have grown increasingly adversarial in the scramble for power since the overthrow of longtime strongman Moammar Kadafi. The new political leadership, which will run Libya until elections are held next year, faces the daunting task of creating a workable government and uniting a country ravaged by war and 42 years of dictatorial rule. "All of Libya is represented," Prime Minister Abdel-Rahim Keeb told a news conference in the capital, Tripoli.
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