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BUSINESS
January 5, 2010
A shrinking aerospace industry Southern California was once a center of the aerospace industry, but the number of aircraft companies headquartered here has been steadily shrinking. Some key events: 1967: Douglas Aircraft of Long Beach merges with McDonnell Aircraft, forming St. Louis-based McDonnell Douglas Corp., which is acquired by Boeing Co. in 1997. 1995: Lockheed Corp., headquartered in Calabasas and with major operations in Burbank, merges with Martin Marietta Corp.
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BUSINESS
April 10, 2014 | By W.J. Hennigan
After years of eliminating jobs in Southern California, aerospace giant Boeing Co. announced plans to increase its engineering workforce in Long Beach and Seal Beach by 1,000 positions. It is a rare and welcome development for the Southland's beleaguered aerospace industry, which has been stung by layoffs and assembly line closures for decades. "I couldn't be happier for the region," Long Beach Mayor Bob Foster said. "We want to continue to carry on our aviation tradition here.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Lawrence O. Kitchen, the business-savvy ex-Marine who ran Lockheed Corp. in an era when the aerospace industry was dominated by scientists and engineers, died Sunday in Woodland Hills of neurological complications. He was 90. Kitchen is credited with turning around Lockheed's troubled operation in Georgia as a young executive, saving the C-5 Galaxy cargo jet program. Years later, he outmaneuvered competitors by persuading the Reagan administration to buy 100 more of the planes, a task that kept him personally lobbying Congress for a stretch of seven months.
BUSINESS
February 22, 2014 | W.J. Hennigan
Workers at Northrop Grumman Corp.'s 1-million-square-foot El Segundo facility on Aviation Boulevard have been cranking out fuselage sections for the Navy's F/A-18 fighter jet for decades. But now, the end may be near. Since entering service in 1983, the lithe twin-engine fighter-bomber has been a symbol of U.S. military might, catapulting from aircraft carrier decks and obliterating targets in the sky and on the ground. Today there are increasing fears that the F/A-18 Super Hornet assembly line may be shut down because of dwindling orders, as the Navy prepares for a new generation of warplane -- the controversial F-35 Joint Strike Fighter.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 2011 | By Elaine Woo, Los Angeles Times
Al Schwimmer, a former aircraft engineer who smuggled American planes to Israel for its 1948 war of independence, founded its aerospace industry and later became a figure in the Iran-Contra affair, died in Tel Aviv on Friday, his 94th birthday. The cause was complications of pneumonia, according to a spokesperson for Israel Aerospace Industries, the company Schwimmer developed and led for more than 25 years. Schwimmer was a 2006 recipient of the Israel Prize, considered the state's highest honor.
BUSINESS
August 9, 1988 | LINDA WILLIAMS, Times Staff Writer
Southern California's aerospace industry was criticized sharply by a Congressional committee Monday for failing to hire and promote more black and Latino workers. A report issued by the House Education and Labor Committee said the proportion of those two minorities in the industry's work force "remained relatively unchanged or worsened" between 1980 and 1986.
NEWS
May 10, 1990 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Lockheed's decision this week to move almost all of its aircraft production to Georgia is the latest and most dramatic sign that Southern California's grip on the high-tech, high-wage aerospace industry is weakening. Aerospace companies have shifted operations from Southern California to small and medium-size cities in Alabama, Arizona, Utah and Georgia, where factories now produce missiles, helicopters, aircraft parts and defense electronics.
BUSINESS
April 8, 1986 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
The aerospace industry, reacting to growing concern over kickback and bribery schemes in defense subcontracts, held an "extraordinary" conference Monday to strengthen efforts to battle corrupt practices. "This is a meeting called with a high sense of urgency," Tom Carvey, a Hughes Aircraft vice president, told about 600 defense industry representatives. "It is high time for us to get together and face a pattern of dishonesty that threatens our well being and that of the industry.
BUSINESS
June 16, 1998 | KAREN KAPLAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
There's finally some good news for Southern California's beleaguered aerospace industry: Opportunities in advanced technology and commercial programs could more than offset job losses in traditional aerospace sectors over the next decade. That optimistic outlook comes from "Beyond Consolidation," a yearlong study of the Southland's aerospace and defense industry that is to be released today.
BUSINESS
March 17, 1996 | JAMES F. PELTZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The painful slump endured by California's aerospace industry finally appears to be over after six long years. Companies are landing new contracts again, massive layoffs are fewer and farther between, and production is picking up. But the aerospace industry--the backbone of a prosperous state economy a decade ago--now operates in a sober new world where fundamental changes have occurred.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 18, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian
Lawrence O. Kitchen, the business-savvy ex-Marine who ran Lockheed Corp. in an era when the aerospace industry was dominated by scientists and engineers, died Sunday in Woodland Hills of neurological complications. He was 90. Kitchen is credited with turning around Lockheed's troubled operation in Georgia as a young executive, saving the C-5 Galaxy cargo jet program. Years later, he outmaneuvered competitors by persuading the Reagan administration to buy 100 more of the planes, a task that kept him personally lobbying Congress for a stretch of seven months.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 9, 2013 | By Ralph Vartabedian, This post has been corrected, as indicated below
With a martini in hand, John Cashen was deep in a discussion of military electronics, when a 747 jetliner seemed to float past in slow motion onto LAX's south runway complex. Cashen, who pioneered the radar-evading design of the B-2 Stealth bomber, stopped to watch the plane - just a few hundred yards away - thunder past his table at the Proud Bird, the aerospace industry's favorite watering hole for more than a half-century. "There's no place else like this in the world," said Cashen, 76, who retired from Northrop Grumman in 1993 but still consults for the firm.
BUSINESS
October 27, 2013 | By Ronald D. White
For Wesco Aircraft Holdings Inc. in Valencia, it's all about making the right connections. And those connections with customers are helping keep many of the world's civil, commercial and military aircraft safe in the air. Wesco Aircraft manages supply chains for the aerospace industry and is one of the world's biggest sellers and distributors of aerospace parts and components. Its more than 525,000 parts and components include fasteners, fittings, nuts, bolts, bushings, clamps, collars, pins, screws and washers.
BUSINESS
April 1, 2013 | Jim Puzzanghera
With the Pentagon set to whack its share of $85 billion in automatic federal budget cuts last month, it didn't take long for Velma Searcy to feel the pain. The owner of a Palmdale maker of military aircraft parts saw two contracts quickly evaporate as defense firms pulled back. Southern California's aerospace industry is expected to be hit hard by the so-called sequester. Still, the state generally should be able to weather the cuts without major economic damage, experts said. That's because California's economy has become more diverse over the past quarter-century, making it much less dependent on cash flowing from Washington, said Stephen Levy, director of the Center for Continuing Study of the California Economy in Palo Alto.
BUSINESS
March 26, 2013 | By W.J. Hennigan, This post has been corrected, as indicated below.
At a time when the aerospace industry is fretful about federal spending, defense contractor Raytheon Co. announced plans to eliminate one of its business units and slash 200 jobs. The Waltham, Mass., company did not say how those cuts will affect its 10,000 workers in California but disclosed that they will result in annual savings of about $85 million. Raytheon made the announcement as part of a larger business consolidation that aims to “achieve stronger alignment with its customers' priorities.” Under the plan, the company will go from six business units to four.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 14, 2013 | By Patrick McGreevy
California lawmakers are trying to resolve differences over competing proposals to host a research-and-testing center for drone aircraft that would be sanctioned by the Federal Aviation Administration. The FAA has called for competing bids to establish six research centers throughout the country to help determine the extent to which non-military drones should be allowed in the U.S. Some officials argue that there should be one unified bid from California. Ventura County has proposed hosting a facility, while a separate proposal, floated by a group calling itself California Unmanned Aircraft Systems (Cal-UAS)
BUSINESS
December 13, 1989 | From Times wire services
Defense spending cuts are expected to trim aerospace industry profits by 13% this year although sales and exports are anticipated at record levels, the Aerospace Industries Assn. said today. Don Fuqua, president of the association, said the effects of several years of reduced defense spending are beginning to show on the bottom lines of most aerospace companies. "I do not minimize the impact on our industry of the defense spending cuts we know are coming," Fuqua said.
BUSINESS
December 22, 2012 | By Ronald D. White, Los Angeles Times
When a toy designer's young daughter becomes fascinated by the gel-like beads in a flower vase, there is only one conclusion to draw: "There has got to be a toy in here somewhere," says Ron Brawer, a partner in the Maya Group and a toy industry veteran. The fast-growing Torrance company has gone on to develop dozens of playthings based on those transparent polymer pellets. One of those toys, a modified water gun called the Xploderz XBlaster 200, was a finalist for the 2012 Outdoor Toy of the Year Award from the Toy Industry Assn.
OPINION
November 13, 2012
Re “ Boeing plans more cuts in region ,” Nov. 9 As a 40-year aerospace retiree, I was sad to hear of the latest decline of the Southern California aerospace industry, with Boeing cutting more facilities. The article indicates that the cuts are due to the latest reduction in military spending. However, the decline in the once extensive aerospace industry here has been going on for decades. Not surprisingly, this decline coincides with the almost total control of the California government by the Democratic Party and the bad business environment it created.
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