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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Raymond, the Douglas Aircraft engineer who helped revolutionize commercial air travel as the principal designer of the DC-3, died Monday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 99 and lived in Bel-Air. The DC-3 was the country's first reliable passenger plane, known as the workhorse of aviation for its indestructibility. More than 50 years later, as many as 2,000 of the original 11,000 planes are still in use around the world.
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ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | MIKE CONKLIN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
That "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" contestant Kevin Olmstead knew that Igor Sikorsky invented the first mass-produced helicopter and thereby became the winner last week of the largest-ever game show prize ($2.18 million) seems almost, well, academic.
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NEWS
September 4, 2000 | JOHN VALENTI, NEWSDAY
There is a whir, a wheeze and a cough, followed by a belch of white smoke and, finally, a throaty, meaty rumble--a roar--as the big, old radial engine comes to life. It is a distinctive sound, one you've likely never heard before, unless you spent time around airports at least half a century ago. You close your eyes and listen and it takes you back to another era, another time, when aviators flew airplanes that had two wings on each side and cockpits open to the wind.
NEWS
September 4, 2000 | JOHN VALENTI, NEWSDAY
There is a whir, a wheeze and a cough, followed by a belch of white smoke and, finally, a throaty, meaty rumble--a roar--as the big, old radial engine comes to life. It is a distinctive sound, one you've likely never heard before, unless you spent time around airports at least half a century ago. You close your eyes and listen and it takes you back to another era, another time, when aviators flew airplanes that had two wings on each side and cockpits open to the wind.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Jack Northrop, the aviation pioneer who founded Northrop Corp., was granted an extraordinary government security clearance just before his death in 1981 to see the company's design for the B-2 Stealth bomber, which resurrects the "flying wing" concept he had invented in the 1940s, the company's chairman disclosed Wednesday. "I went to the Air Force and said, 'Let this man know,' " Northrop Chairman Thomas V.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | NANCY JO HILL
David G. Price says his fascination with airplanes started when he was 7 years old. He lived half a block from what was then known as Clover Field and today is Santa Monica Airport. "It was during World War II and I used to go over to the field and watch the airplanes take off," says Price, 56, president of the new Museum of Flying. "My parents were from England and as a little boy, I'd dream of flying Spitfires," he recalls.
ENTERTAINMENT
April 17, 2001 | MIKE CONKLIN, CHICAGO TRIBUNE
That "Who Wants to Be a Millionaire" contestant Kevin Olmstead knew that Igor Sikorsky invented the first mass-produced helicopter and thereby became the winner last week of the largest-ever game show prize ($2.18 million) seems almost, well, academic.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Schilhavy was just 11 years old when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the desolate gray surface of the moon. Despite being at an age when collecting baseball cards and riding bikes were pretty much full-time occupations, the event filled him with awe and inspiration. And it still does.
NEWS
March 23, 1995
TAGGER TURNAROUND: With all the revulsion--and even aggression--aimed at graffiti artists these days, one would think super-tagger Chaka might be keeping a low profile. Hardly. There he was last week, doing his multicolored thing on the broad side of a church bus in Hawthorne. Yet his latest shenanigans are unlikely to get him shot at or even arrested. Because this time he's doing them for God.
NEWS
March 19, 1995
Hollywood's Walk of Fame and other landmarks may honor actors who play heroes with the right stuff. But Westchester celebrates the real thing. Westchester's "Flight Path"--a sort of Walk of Fame for the pioneers of aviation--is about to land at the, er, glamorous intersection of Sepulveda Boulevard and 89th Street. Or at least organizers would like it to.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 22, 1999 | COLL METCALFE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Peter Schilhavy was just 11 years old when astronaut Neil Armstrong stepped onto the desolate gray surface of the moon. Despite being at an age when collecting baseball cards and riding bikes were pretty much full-time occupations, the event filled him with awe and inspiration. And it still does.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 26, 1999 | ELAINE WOO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arthur E. Raymond, the Douglas Aircraft engineer who helped revolutionize commercial air travel as the principal designer of the DC-3, died Monday at St. John's Hospital in Santa Monica. He was 99 and lived in Bel-Air. The DC-3 was the country's first reliable passenger plane, known as the workhorse of aviation for its indestructibility. More than 50 years later, as many as 2,000 of the original 11,000 planes are still in use around the world.
NEWS
August 12, 1989 | NANCY JO HILL
David G. Price says his fascination with airplanes started when he was 7 years old. He lived half a block from what was then known as Clover Field and today is Santa Monica Airport. "It was during World War II and I used to go over to the field and watch the airplanes take off," says Price, 56, president of the new Museum of Flying. "My parents were from England and as a little boy, I'd dream of flying Spitfires," he recalls.
BUSINESS
May 19, 1988 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, Times Staff Writer
Jack Northrop, the aviation pioneer who founded Northrop Corp., was granted an extraordinary government security clearance just before his death in 1981 to see the company's design for the B-2 Stealth bomber, which resurrects the "flying wing" concept he had invented in the 1940s, the company's chairman disclosed Wednesday. "I went to the Air Force and said, 'Let this man know,' " Northrop Chairman Thomas V.
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