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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
A spacecraft intended to demonstrate deployment of a solar sail was damaged while undergoing testing in Russia, a mission official said Wednesday. The extent of damage was unclear, and the craft's launch will be delayed weeks or months, said Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society in Pasadena and the Cosmos 1 project director. The craft was scheduled for launch April 26 from a Russian missile submarine in the Barents Sea.
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NEWS
May 19, 2001 | JOHN KLIMA, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Sometimes it resembles a carnival act more than a softball game. Step right up and try to hit Rio Mesa High pitcher Chanel Tripp. The junior right-hander hurled a no-hitter and struck out 14 to lead the Spartans (21-6) over Saugus, 2-0, Friday in a Southern Section Division II playoff opener at Rio Mesa. Though she hadn't pitched in more then a week, Tripp (20-3) shook off early rust and commanded her three-pitch arsenal with stunning efficiency.
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BUSINESS
September 9, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell in Russian Space Deal: Rockwell International Corp. said it signed a letter of understanding with the Russian aerospace company NPO Energiya to pursue several space initiatives. Under the agreement, the Russian firm will provide the engineering work and eventually some hardware for a docking system that would enable the U.S. shuttle orbiter to dock with Russia's Mir space station. In turn, Rockwell will purchase engineering data on spacecraft performance from the Russian company.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 12, 2001 | From Associated Press
A spacecraft intended to demonstrate deployment of a solar sail was damaged while undergoing testing in Russia, a mission official said Wednesday. The extent of damage was unclear, and the craft's launch will be delayed weeks or months, said Louis Friedman, executive director of the Planetary Society in Pasadena and the Cosmos 1 project director. The craft was scheduled for launch April 26 from a Russian missile submarine in the Barents Sea.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most significant linkup so far between U.S. and Russian defense firms, Lockheed and Khrunichev Enterprise of Moscow announced Monday that they have formed a joint venture to sell commercial launch services with the Russian Proton rocket. The alliance combines two Cold War industrial adversaries: Lockheed, the largest U.S. manufacturer of military space hardware, and Khrunichev, one of Russia's leading state-owned aerospace operations. Lockheed Vice President Mel R.
BUSINESS
September 9, 1992 | CRISTINA LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Aerospace giant Rockwell International Corp. said Tuesday that it has signed a letter of understanding with a major Russian aerospace company to cooperate on several space-related projects, including a plan to use the Soyuz spacecraft as a rescue vehicle for space station Freedom. Under the terms of the agreement, signed late Friday, Russia's NPO Energiya will provide Rockwell with all the engineering work and eventually add some hardware for a space docking system to enable the U.S.
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, Leonid Pichugov was a mechanic tightening bolts on aircraft undercarriages at a local Soviet airport. On Tuesday, he was standing in a suit next to a mock-up of the eight-passenger plane that his company, Interavia, is hoping to peddle worldwide out of a rented former MIG fighter-plane factory near here.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Export-Import Bank of the United States gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a controversial Russian aircraft project that would create jobs for a dozen U.S. aerospace contractors--but which Boeing and McDonnell Douglas argue would subsidize a foreign challenger to their dominance of the global aircraft market. The details were finalized in meetings Tuesday in Washington between Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watch out, Arianespace. Take heed, McDonnell Douglas. With a quiet crack, the $2-billion-a-year market in launching Western satellites is opening to admit the Russian interloper who has been hammering for years at its gates. Amid exorbitant pastries and a press of Russian reporters, space officials signed a historic contract in late April for the first commercial launch of a Western-built satellite by a Russian rocket.
BUSINESS
August 14, 1992 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Boeing Co. has decided to get the edge on its competitors by hiring Russian scientists and engineers to work at a new research center it plans to open in Moscow, Boeing officials said Thursday. "Douglas (Aircraft Co.) has really taken a beating from Airbus (Industries)," said Benjamin A. Cosgrove, senior vice president of Boeing Commercial Airplane Group in Seattle. "I do not want for Boeing to become the GM of the '90s, so we've got to make our airplanes better and better.
BUSINESS
February 1, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI and JAMES GERSTENZANG, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
One day after the United States said it would subsidize development of a new Russian jet, the Clinton administration announced that Russia has agreed to give foreign aircraft companies, including McDonnell Douglas and Boeing, greater access to one of the world's largest emerging aircraft markets.
BUSINESS
January 31, 1996 | EVELYN IRITANI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Export-Import Bank of the United States gave preliminary approval Tuesday to a controversial Russian aircraft project that would create jobs for a dozen U.S. aerospace contractors--but which Boeing and McDonnell Douglas argue would subsidize a foreign challenger to their dominance of the global aircraft market. The details were finalized in meetings Tuesday in Washington between Vice President Al Gore and Russian Prime Minister Viktor Chernomyrdin.
BUSINESS
January 22, 1994 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rockwell May Supply Parts to Russian Airliners: The aerospace company is taking part in a program to supply parts to a fleet of Russian airliners in a deal that its partner says could be worth $1 billion. Government officials disclosed that Connecticut-based Pratt & Whitney has begun a $1-million feasibility study to determine whether it can supply engines to outfit 20 Russian Ilyushin 96-M passenger jets. Seal Beach-based Rockwell International Corp.'
NEWS
September 1, 1993 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Four years ago, Leonid Pichugov was a mechanic tightening bolts on aircraft undercarriages at a local Soviet airport. On Tuesday, he was standing in a suit next to a mock-up of the eight-passenger plane that his company, Interavia, is hoping to peddle worldwide out of a rented former MIG fighter-plane factory near here.
NEWS
May 11, 1993 | CAREY GOLDBERG, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Watch out, Arianespace. Take heed, McDonnell Douglas. With a quiet crack, the $2-billion-a-year market in launching Western satellites is opening to admit the Russian interloper who has been hammering for years at its gates. Amid exorbitant pastries and a press of Russian reporters, space officials signed a historic contract in late April for the first commercial launch of a Western-built satellite by a Russian rocket.
BUSINESS
December 29, 1992 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In the most significant linkup so far between U.S. and Russian defense firms, Lockheed and Khrunichev Enterprise of Moscow announced Monday that they have formed a joint venture to sell commercial launch services with the Russian Proton rocket. The alliance combines two Cold War industrial adversaries: Lockheed, the largest U.S. manufacturer of military space hardware, and Khrunichev, one of Russia's leading state-owned aerospace operations. Lockheed Vice President Mel R.
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