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Aerospace Industry

CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
April 4, 1992 | MARK A. STEIN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
County transit agencies are seeking a $4-million federal grant to begin studying whether buses and trains can be manufactured with carbon-fiber composites and other exotic materials--an idea that could revolutionize mass transit and revive the local aerospace industry.
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BUSINESS
September 5, 2006 | Peter Pae, Times Staff Writer
Somber headlines and gloomy forecasts have cast a pall over much of Southern California's aerospace industry, leaving tens of thousands of workers with an understandable sense of vertigo. In the last several months Boeing Co. has shuttered the 717 jetliner plant in Long Beach and, bowing to a lack of new orders, taken the first steps toward shutting the neighboring line that churns out C-17 cargo planes. About 6,000 jobs would be lost or reclassified.
NEWS
February 28, 1993 | EDMUND NEWTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Workers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory say that even though last week's announcement that the space research center will cut its work force by 1,000 in the next five years was long expected, it has intensified the anxiety level in offices and laboratories. * "I've had three employees coming in today asking, 'What does this mean?' " said the head of one research group, who asked not to be named. "They want to know if they have to worry about their jobs."
NEWS
March 6, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Union Army burned the South, it marched right past the isolated burg of Eufaula, Ala. But 120 years later, the historic town did not slip past the keen gaze of the Hughes Aircraft Co. Hughes set up a factory in 1984 to produce tactical missile components in Eufaula, creating 250 jobs. Though dozens of miles from the nearest interstate, rural Eufaula offered many seductions to the Los Angeles-based firm--chief among them U.S. Rep. William L.
BUSINESS
May 21, 2007 | Alicia Chang, The Associated Press
Justin Wong, an aerospace engineering student from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, was schmoozing on facebook.com last fall, when he came across a sleek Boeing Co. job ad. Wong, who had just interned at the aerospace company, saw the banner on the popular social networking site as a "two-way street" -- a defense behemoth reaching out to today's youths in their virtual playground.
BUSINESS
November 17, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
More than 41,000 California companies make their living supplying the aerospace-defense industry. That may come as a surprise given the widespread belief that aerospace is part of California's history, not of its future. But that conventional notion is not only wrong but harmful. It makes the vast number of small, struggling aerospace supplier companies feel like neglected orphans.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 22, 1998 | TOM GRAY, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
Federal budget cuts, recession, earthquake, downsizing, corporate flight and the end of the Cold War--recent years seemed to bring nothing but bad news for the San Fernando Valley's once-mighty aerospace and defense industries. If you didn't read much past the headlines, you might have thought the Valley's aerospace industry had either shut down by now or had packed up and left, as indeed much of it has. But in fact, much of the industry is still here. It's even showing signs of growth.
NEWS
November 21, 1991 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When George Bush relaxes aboard Air Force One for a presidential meal, his food is served up on galley equipment produced by Jamco, a little-known Japanese firm that has gained international dominance in aircraft kitchens and lavatories. As goes President Bush's Boeing 747, so goes much of the rest of U.S. commercial aircraft.
BUSINESS
September 7, 1993 | DON LEE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Special Devices Inc., a longtime maker of components that trigger the Patriot and Cruise missiles, now wants to put the boom in automobile air bags. Switching fields could give the Newhall-based company a much-needed boost. With defense budget cuts trimming its market, Special Devices has seen its aerospace sales skid 13% from fiscal 1989, to $17.5 million last year. Its earnings are lagging, and so is its stock, which closed Friday at $10 a share, about where it was two years ago.
BUSINESS
June 28, 1995 | RALPH VARTABEDIAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After seven years in which everything went wrong for the California aerospace industry, some very important things are finally going right. The decision this week by Lockheed Martin Corp. to move two major manufacturing operations from the East Coast to a once-threatened plant in Sunnyvale marks the first time that a consolidation by a defense contractor has actually benefited California.
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