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NEWS
June 1, 1997
Los Angeles County welfare officials will begin distributing checks in person today, rather than by mail, to women receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). The new program, which requires recipients to come to one of 44 designated retail outlets, was adopted because so many checks were being lost or stolen in the mail. Checks are being distributed on a Sunday because it is the first day of the month. More than 300,000 people in the county receive AFDC.
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NEWS
January 6, 1998 | MELISSA HEALY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Delaware, one of the first states to implement a comprehensive welfare reform plan, reported Monday that two years later, welfare clients in the new program had higher work rates, greater earnings and lower welfare payments than a small group allowed to continue in the old Aid to Families with Dependent Children program.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 13, 1992
Regarding the budget cuts and the impact on AFDC and education: When I read about mothers who rely on welfare bemoaning the cost of diapers ($125 per month according to one) and baby wipes and baby powder, the need for education is really brought home. Has no one ever told these women about cloth diapers, wash cloths, and hot, soapy water? JO-ANNE JARVIS, Huntington Beach
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 15, 1997 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Striding through the cavernous warehouse of the Franklin Brass company with its personnel director, Frank Mora does not waste the opportunity, honing in with the instincts of a born salesman: "Clerical sales, you guys do clerical sales? We have quite a few people with a sales background. "What about drivers? You guys do delivery? I got someone in mind right now." On this occasion, Mora is batting 0 for 2.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 19, 1994
Gov. Pete Wilson has again proposed Draconian cuts of 25% in the Aid to Families with Dependent Children program (AFDC) that nearly 2 million children depend on for their subsistence (Jan. 8). Such a cut would reduce a family to less than half the federal poverty level. This attempt to balance California's budget at the expense of children, in the midst of recession and growing family homelessness, is callous and tyrannical in the extreme. Additionally, Wilson calls for a two-year time limit on AFDC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 20, 1992
Being an AFDC (Aid to Families With Dependent Children) recipient myself, I was appalled at the opinions of your readers (Letters, Sept. 13). Are these the same people who consider all homeless people as bums? Without considering the fact that a lot of homeless come from mental facilities and board-and-care homes that have been shut down by our state? Not to mention our high unemployment rates. I don't know who those recipients were they interviewed. I think they are a small percentage of people on AFDC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 7, 1992
Welfare reform is certainly needed in California, but cutting benefits isn't the answer as our governor believes. Having been on AFDC and as a single mother, I know the system and I know where the resources lie to get out of the system--education. I have been in college part time and have acquired part-time employment on campus or through the job listings there. I have achieved not only an education, but job skills as well. I am eligible for many forms of financial aid by virtue of receiving AFDC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 27, 1992
Our readers wrote letters throughout 1992, expressing their viewpoints on a variety of issues. Here are condensed versions of some of those letters to help us remember the events that mattered to Orange County readers this past year. We would like to thank the readers who took the time to share their views, and we look forward to hearing from them and others in 1992. Regarding the budget cuts and the impact on AFDC and education: When I read about mothers who rely on welfare bemoaning the cost of diapers ($125 per month, according to one)
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
May 7, 1994
Your April 26 article on the recent study examining welfare fraud in Orange County suggests that California officials may be misguided in cracking down on welfare fraud. Nothing could be further from the truth. The fraud rate for all Aid to Families With Dependent Children cases is not "only about 4%"; that number refers to the amount of fraud detected through the quality-control process, a system designed primarily to find errors by welfare officials, not fraud. The truth is, since 1970, a range of studies have put the rate of welfare fraud anywhere from 10% to 100%.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 4, 1987
More homes are needed for abused or neglected children. While some grandparents, aunts or uncles or other relatives would like to take them in, members of extended families often cannot afford the cost of raising additional children. The children must then be placed in foster homes or expensive county care facilities. California Assemblyman Rusty Areias (D-Los Banos) has sponsored a bill that would give families caught in this dilemma a better chance to stay together.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanessa Fraise-Frelow was angry Sunday morning. The mother of six young children had gotten up early to get her welfare check from Los Angeles County officials with the intention of being back with her kids within an hour. Instead, the 36-year-old mom found that the line at a Pacoima check-cashing outlet distributing checks for the Aid to Families With Dependent Children program was long and painfully slow.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
June 2, 1997 | TIMOTHY WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Vanessa Fraise-Frelow was angry Sunday morning. The mother of six young children had gotten up early to get her welfare check from Los Angeles County officials with the intention of getting back to her kids within an hour. Instead, the 36-year-old found a long and painfully slow line at a Pacoima check-cashing outlet distributing checks for the Aid to Families With Dependent Children program.
NEWS
June 1, 1997
Los Angeles County welfare officials will begin distributing checks in person today, rather than by mail, to women receiving Aid to Families with Dependent Children (AFDC). The new program, which requires recipients to come to one of 44 designated retail outlets, was adopted because so many checks were being lost or stolen in the mail. Checks are being distributed on a Sunday because it is the first day of the month. More than 300,000 people in the county receive AFDC.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
January 12, 1997 | SCOTT MARTELLE, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When Tracy Evans turned to the Orange County welfare system for help for herself and her son 3 1/2 years ago, she did it amid a whirlwind of emotion. There was fear and nagging disquiet. Uncertainty. And the resigned despair that comes with feeling forced to do something you don't want to. "It's not a shame thing, but you definitely have to swallow your pride when you're on AFDC [Aid to Families with Dependent Children]," Evans said.
NEWS
May 27, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Senate Finance Committee passed legislation Friday that would end the six-decade federal guarantee of support to every destitute American woman with children by transferring vast authority over the welfare system to states. Only one Democrat, Sen. Max Baucus (D-Mont.), joined Republicans in the 12-8 vote, which sets the stage for a floor debate next month on what is likely to be one of the most important decisions of the current Congress.
NEWS
March 28, 1995 | ELIZABETH SHOGREN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In one of the clearest signals yet that the nation's welfare system faces fundamental change, a key committee chairman predicted Monday that the Senate will join the House in voting to rescind the government's 60-year pledge to provide cash benefits to all who qualify. Finance Committee Chairman Bob Packwood (R-Ore.
NEWS
August 19, 1987 | Associated Press
The Massachusetts Supreme Court ruled Tuesday that welfare families must get enough money to allow them to remain in their own homes, a decision the state says could cost $780 million a year. The ruling was hailed by welfare activists who say Massachusetts benefits are 40% below the federal poverty line. The decision came in a suit filed by the Massachusetts Coalition for the Homeless and the Massachusetts Coalition for Basic Human Needs.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
October 15, 1994 | LESLIE BERGER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fingerprinting welfare recipients has saved Los Angeles County $4.5 million in a single month and could yield as much as $116 million in savings over the next 2 1/2 years, according to an evaluation of an experimental anti-fraud program. The program, a potential national model, is designed to ensure that applicants for Aid to Families With Dependent Children are not using fake IDs to receive more than one set of benefits a month.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
July 12, 1994
As a teacher of biology, I found Alexander Cockburn's "Eugenics Nuts Would Have Loved Norplant" (Column Left, June 30) very interesting. However, I think Cockburn missed the point of Norplant for Aid to Families with Dependent Children mothers. The point of Norplant for AFDC mothers is one of responsibility. That responsibility is for the AFDC mother, having had one child at a child's age, to ensure she not have another as long as she and the child are the responsibility of the state.
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