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Affirmation Action

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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
February 22, 1995 | CARLA RIVERA, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As the Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors weighs a motion to oppose efforts to overturn state affirmative action programs, the supervisors came under fire Tuesday from the county's Chicano Employees Assn. over new affirmative action guidelines that it says adversely affect Latino workers.
ARTICLES BY DATE
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 30, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - When the state Senate took up the issue of affirmative action in late January, it was a relatively tepid affair. After 20 minutes of polite debate, senators passed a measure that, if approved by voters, would overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public higher education. But within weeks, the debate turned fractious. Backlash arose among some Asian Americans who feared their children could lose access to the state's universities if more places were granted to students from other minority groups.
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CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
August 27, 1996
I found your story on affirmative action very distressing--especially when I read the quotes by two white women who blame minorities for robbing them of opportunities ("Opponents of Prop. 209 Target Women Voters," Aug. 20). Girlfriends, wake up! When they keep one group down, they keep us all down. As a Chinese American woman, I belong to two minority groups, and not a day goes by that I don't see examples of how discrimination interlocks gender and race in mutual oppression. Studies have shown that women, not minorities, are the biggest beneficiaries of affirmative action.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO -- State Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina) portrayed Monday the shelving of his amendment to overturn the state's ban on affirmative action in higher education as an attempt to defuse the increasingly heated backlash the proposal has generated in recent weeks. "Given the scare tactics and misinformation used by certain groups opposed to SCA 5, we felt it was necessary to have a discussion based on facts and take the time to hear from experts on the challenges our public universities and colleges face with regards to diversity, as well as the implications for California's workforce and our overall competitiveness in a global economy," Hernandez told reporters at the Capitol.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Melanie Mason
An effort to overturn California's ban on affirmative action in public universities stalled in the Legislature on Monday. The proposed constitutional amendment by Sen. Ed Hernandez (D-West Covina) would have removed references to higher education from Proposition 209, an initiative passed by voters in 1996 that bans consideration by government institutions  of race, ethnicity and sex in hiring, school admissions and contracting. The amendment, SCA 5, passed the Senate in January on a party-line vote.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 17, 2014 | By Patrick McGreevy and Melanie Mason
SACRAMENTO - The Democrats' loss of a legislative supermajority stifled their push to change California's campaign finance and affirmative action laws Monday, potentially foreshadowing a return to partisan battles over their other priorities, such as property taxes, water policy and a rainy-day fund. Monday's losses come less than two years after Democrats won a historic two-thirds control over both the state Senate and Assembly, eliminating the need for a single Republican vote on any bill.
OPINION
March 7, 2014 | By Karthick Ramakrishnan
Is the debate on affirmative action versus race-blind policies mainly about principle, or mostly about preserving narrow group interests? We are beginning to find out in California. A bill passed by the state Senate and pending in the Assembly would put a constitutional amendment on the ballot that would overturn portions of Proposition 209 to exempt public college and university admissions from the ban on racial, ethnic and gender preferences. There are principled reasons to support as well as to oppose affirmative action in higher education.
OPINION
February 12, 2014
Re "Real diversity is colorblind," Opinion, Feb. 7 Jennifer Gratz presents the phony argument that not giving additional credit to African American students applying for college is race-neutral. The argument would be valid only if American society in general were race-neutral, which it is not. African Americans are much more likely than whites to live in districts with inferior K-12 schools; they are more likely to be at a disadvantage in being prepared to compete for a place in California's selective universities.
OPINION
December 27, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
Whatever you think of affirmative action programs at universities and graduate schools, it's important to know whether they're working - that is, whether they are preparing their beneficiaries for professional success. But for several years now, the California bar has resisted attempts by a critic of racial preferences to obtain information about the test scores and grades of graduates who take the state bar examination. Last week, the California Supreme Court wisely rejected the state bar's argument and ruled it must turn over the information to Richard Sander, a law professor at UCLA, and other researchers - provided that a way is found to protect the identities of individual test-takers.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
December 19, 2013 | By Larry Gordon
Researchers looking into the possible effects of affirmative action programs on law schools and the legal profession should have access to state bar exam scores and other records if individuals' privacy can be ensured, the state Supreme Court ruled Thursday. The unanimous decision was a boost for UCLA law professor Richard Sander, who has been battling the state bar for five years to obtain the data. Sander wants the information to test his controversial theory that racial preferences in law school admissions might hurt minority students by putting them in overly competitive environments.
NATIONAL
October 15, 2013 | By David G. Savage
WASHINGTON - The U.S. Supreme Court's conservative justices signaled Tuesday that they were inclined to uphold California and Michigan ballot measures that forbid state universities from granting "preferential treatment" to applicants based on race. Oral arguments on affirmative action turned into a debate over the meaning of equal treatment under the law, with the justices sounding split along the usual ideological lines. The conservatives, agreeing with Michigan's state lawyers, said removing race as a factor led to equal treatment as required under the 14th Amendment to the Constitution.
OPINION
October 14, 2013 | By The Times editorial board
In 2006, Michigan voters banned affirmative action at the state's public universities. On Tuesday, the Supreme Court will hear arguments challenging that ban. If you support affirmative action, you must hope that the court will strike it down, right? Alas, it's not that simple. This case isn't about whether state universities may provide preferential treatment in their admissions policies. Rather, the question is whether the voters of Michigan violated the U.S. Constitution when they amended the state Constitution to say that universities "shall not discriminate against, or grant preferential treatment to, any individual or group on the basis of race, sex, color, ethnicity or national origin.
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