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Affordable Housing California

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BUSINESS
October 5, 2001 | Diane Wedner
Housing affordability in California rose to 32% in August, up 3 percentage points from a year earlier, according to the California Assn. of Realtors. In Los Angeles County, 34% of residents could afford homes, up from 33% a year ago. At 24%, San Diego was the least-affordable county in the region, up 1 percentage point over last year. Only 27% of Orange County's residents could afford a median-priced home in August, up from 26% a year earlier.
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BUSINESS
October 5, 2001 | Diane Wedner
Housing affordability in California rose to 32% in August, up 3 percentage points from a year earlier, according to the California Assn. of Realtors. In Los Angeles County, 34% of residents could afford homes, up from 33% a year ago. At 24%, San Diego was the least-affordable county in the region, up 1 percentage point over last year. Only 27% of Orange County's residents could afford a median-priced home in August, up from 26% a year earlier.
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BUSINESS
September 7, 2001 | Diane Wedner
Housing affordability in California inched up in July to 32% from 31% a year earlier, the California Assn. of Realtors reported. Based on CAR's index, San Diego was the least affordable county in Southern California, with only 24% of households able to afford a median-priced home, up slightly from 23% a year earlier. Orange County was the second-least-affordable county at 28%, up one percentage point.
BUSINESS
September 7, 2001 | Diane Wedner
Housing affordability in California inched up in July to 32% from 31% a year earlier, the California Assn. of Realtors reported. Based on CAR's index, San Diego was the least affordable county in Southern California, with only 24% of households able to afford a median-priced home, up slightly from 23% a year earlier. Orange County was the second-least-affordable county at 28%, up one percentage point.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
California is expected to add 6 million residents in the next 20 years while its stock of affordable housing is projected to shrink given current construction trends. Economists warn that housing shortages and high housing costs could threaten the state's ability to attract and retain workers and exacerbate traffic and environmental problems. On Wednesday, UCLA Extension is hosting a daylong conference to discuss ways to meet the state's housing needs.
BUSINESS
March 22, 1995 | From Associated Press
California cities again dominated the list of the nation's least affordable housing markets in the final months of 1994, while Midwestern cities remained the most affordable. San Francisco was again at the bottom of the National Assn. of Home Builders' Housing Opportunity Index during the October-December period. The city has been the least affordable market since the association began the surveys in the first quarter of 1991.
BUSINESS
November 26, 1991 | DANIEL AKST
Can a veteran developer of standard suburban tract housing succeed by re-creating the small-town feeling that communities had in his youth? Or will a sluggish real estate market dash our hero's hopes of doing well by doing good? Stay tuned. This particular soap opera is being played out 11 miles south of our leafy old capital, whose charm and cheapness have made it a magnet for refugees from pricier venues throughout California.
NEWS
September 14, 1990 | BILL STALL, TIMES POLITICAL WRITER
Dianne Feinstein promised Thursday that if she is elected governor she will revive the dream of homeownership for young Californians. She also talked of building whole new towns along a proposed railroad line through the Central Valley. Feinstein showed off some of the new housing built in pricey San Francisco for low-income families and first-time homeowners under programs inaugurated by her administration as mayor.
BUSINESS
November 12, 1991 | MARTHA GROVES, TIMES STAFF WRITER
To buy or not to buy. That is the quandary for many would-be home purchasers as mortgage rates come tumbling down and buyers have the upper hand in California's sluggish real estate market. Today's lower prices look tempting, but they're still far from cheap. And real estate's current doldrums have some people wondering if the good times in housing appreciation are gone for good. Among people paid to worry about this, the consensus is that it still pays to buy a house--over the long haul.
NEWS
September 22, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mirroring a law passed to benefit Holocaust victims two years ago, Gov. Gray Davis has signed legislation that will allow victims of the Armenian genocide and their heirs to pursue unpaid insurance claims in California courts. The bill by state Sen. Chuck Poochigian (R-Fresno) allows victims of the genocide at the hands of Turks from 1915 to 1923 to file suits in California against insurers to recover money allegedly owed from policies.
NEWS
May 5, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In what would be the largest investment of its kind in California history, the Democrats who rule the Assembly unveiled a $1-billion plan Thursday to help relieve the state's chronic housing shortage. The proposal would help people buy homes and fund a sweeping array of housing initiatives touching Californians in every corner of the state--from farm workers in the Central Valley to teachers in Los Angeles to dot-com employees in Silicon Valley.
NEWS
March 20, 2000 | MIGUEL BUSTILLO, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In West Los Angeles, a kindergarten teacher's average salary falls $67,000 short of the income needed to buy a median-priced home in the school neighborhood. In Palo Alto, a police detective's pay would have to triple to finance a home in the community the officer patrols. In San Francisco, minimum-wage workers would have to toil 146 hours a week to pay the average rent on a two-bedroom apartment.
BUSINESS
December 6, 1999 | Stephen Gregory
California is expected to add 6 million residents in the next 20 years while its stock of affordable housing is projected to shrink given current construction trends. Economists warn that housing shortages and high housing costs could threaten the state's ability to attract and retain workers and exacerbate traffic and environmental problems. On Wednesday, UCLA Extension is hosting a daylong conference to discuss ways to meet the state's housing needs.
NEWS
December 5, 1999 | From Associated Press
Washoe and Douglas counties haven't done their fair share to create affordable housing at Lake Tahoe, members of the Tahoe Regional Planning Agency say. The staff is recommending that the two counties and El Dorado, Calif., do more to deal with the problem, which has been blamed for a shortage of ski resort employees for the upcoming season. The agency's governing board will consider the issue at a Dec. 15 meeting. "It's kind of a wake-up call," said Peter Eichar, a regional agency planner.
BUSINESS
August 25, 1999 | JAMES FLANIGAN
The challenge is clear. In the next year alone, Southern California's population will grow by more than 275,000 and the state of California will add half a million residents. In the next five years, that population growth will more than triple. Employment won't be the problem. We know approximately where all those people will work. More than 1.6 million additional jobs will be created in Southern California in the next five years, the state Employment Development Department projects.
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