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WORLD
January 8, 2003 | Chris Kraul, Times Staff Writer
Good-natured and gung-ho in his crisp green battle fatigues, Kramatullah Nazari looks every bit the ideal recruit. One of 415 Afghan army soldiers who graduated from basic training Tuesday, the 23-year-old says he's eager to take on Al Qaeda and help bring peace to his country. But recruits like Nazari are hardly plentiful -- and that's of increasing concern to the Afghan government and the U.S.
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WORLD
February 4, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The U.S. Marines and Afghan army plan a massive assault on Taliban fighters in Marja, the last community under Taliban control in a sprawling, lawless region of Afghanistan once dominated by the insurgency, a top Marine said Wednesday. "We are going to gain control," Col. George "Slam" Amland told reporters. "We are going to alter the ecosystem considerably." Amland, deputy commander of Marine forces in southern Afghanistan, would not discuss the timing of the assault or how many thousands of troops would be involved.
WORLD
September 22, 2010 | By Tony Perry, Los Angeles Times
Before there was 9/11 in America, there was 9/9 in Afghanistan. On the eve of the attacks on New York and the Pentagon, assassins working for Osama bin Laden murdered Ahmed Shah Massoud, military commander of the anti- Taliban force known as the Northern Alliance. American intelligence officials say Bin Laden acted preemptively to eliminate a natural ally of the U.S. if Washington were to invade Afghanistan to topple the Taliban regime that had sheltered Bin Laden and his Al Qaeda followers.
WORLD
July 10, 2013 | By David Zucchino
MAIDAN SHAHR, Afghanistan - Congress has appropriated $51 billion to build and sustain the Afghan army, but Lt. Col. Kohadamani Hamidullah can't get his Humvees repaired. "See all those Humvees?" he said inside his military base here in east-central Afghanistan, pointing to a ragged line of dusty Humvees. "Broken. Broken. Broken.... All broken. " The United States has supplied 46 Humvees for Hamidullah's battalion here in the rugged, snowcapped peaks of Wardak province in the last couple of years.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Afghan army warned residents along the Salang Highway to flee their homes because of fierce fighting expected on the vital supply route between Kabul and the Soviet Union, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported Tuesday. With only one week before the last Soviet troops are due to leave Afghanistan under a peace accord, Tass said Muslim rebels battling the Soviet-backed Kabul government are again attacking food and fuel convoys.
WORLD
February 10, 2013 | By David S. Cloud and Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - In an effort to fight the insurgency after U.S. troops leave Afghanistan by the end of next year, officials in Washington and Kabul are planning to dramatically expand a 3-year-old rural police force that has been implicated in human rights abuses and criminal activity. The plan by the U.S. Special Operations Command would extend a financial lifeline from the Pentagon to the Afghan Local Police for at least five more years, providing $1.2 billion to train, arm and pay 45,000 fighters, up from a current force of 19,600, according to senior U.S. officials and planning documents.
WORLD
August 22, 2006 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
This remote village in the high desert of southern Afghanistan is home to six mud huts and 70 people. A few miles away, tucked behind two soaring escarpments, the settlement of Qazi contains four huts, 50 people and a few goats. More than 100 Afghan army soldiers descended on the two villages one day last month looking for Taliban fighters. After a carefully scripted battle plan, the soldiers sealed the villages and searched every hut, shed, paddock and fighting-age male.
WORLD
January 12, 2013 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
TARIN KOWT, Afghanistan - A shy boy with filthy hands and a shabby tunic approached the great man, bowed and tried to kiss his hand. Gen. Matiullah Khan was seated like a sultan on a cushion in his hojra , his airy receiving room. He barely looked at the boy. He nodded to an aide, who withdrew a thick wad of Pakistani rupees from his pocket and handed it to Matiullah. The most powerful man in Oruzgan province, a warlord and tribal leader turned police chief, glanced at the cash.
WORLD
March 2, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Late last year, before leaving Forward Operating Base Tillman for the last time, U.S. troops took apart every inch of the remote outpost near the border with Pakistan, from the dirt-packed barricades to the flat-screen TVs in the intelligence center. Mohibullah Samim, the governor of Paktika province, where the base was located, called it a waste. "I was against dismantling it," Samim said. "It would have been better to hand it over to the Afghan army to keep the border area safe.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Afghan government reported Saturday that its troops, backed by tanks and artillery, have advanced farther toward the Pakistani border, destroying guerrilla bases and killing 81 insurgents. Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammed Nabi Amani said the Afghan army, on the fourth day of an offensive, advanced two miles and was 32 miles from the border. Amani said government troops are in complete control of Jalalabad and surrounding hills, giving them a strategic advantage over the rebels.
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