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WORLD
April 28, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan — For the first time, a member of Afghanistan's elite special forces has carried out a deadly attack against an American military mentor, a senior Afghan army official said Friday, an ominous escalation in the "green-on-blue" shootings that have threatened Western troops' partnership with the Afghan police and army. Until now, rank-and-file members of the Afghan security forces had been responsible for most of the dozens of "insider" shootings targeting members of the NATO force in recent years.
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WORLD
September 1, 2008 | From the Associated Press
An Afghan army commander said U.S. and Afghan troops were fired on first from a village where a government inquiry commission says scores of civilians were killed, according to a report released Sunday. The chief of staff for the army's Herat corps told the head of the government's investigative commission that shots were fired early Aug. 22 at U.S. and Afghan troops who had gone to Azizabad on a raid. They had not entered the village. But the report, which appeared to be preliminary findings and was released by the office of President Hamid Karzai, does not specify who fired the shots.
NEWS
May 9, 1988 | Associated Press
Muslim guerrillas Sunday claimed that they killed 300 Afghan army troops and captured 120 as they overran a government post in eastern Afghanistan. A statement by the seven-member alliance of guerrilla parties said it received news of the victory in a radio report late Saturday. At the same time, Afghanistan's Kabul Radio was reporting that government forces inflicted "heavy losses" on guerrillas at the same site, capturing scores of rockets, mortars, machine guns, mines and ammunition.
WORLD
December 25, 2012 | By David Zucchino, Los Angeles Times
SUROBI, Afghanistan - Col. Babagul Aamal is a proud veteran of 28 years in the Afghan National Army. Short and fit, with a thick black beard, he's a leader who blurts out exactly what he's thinking. "I don't talk politics - I talk facts," Aamal said, wearing a sweater beneath his uniform in his unheated command office on a dusty base 40 miles east of Kabul. It shames him, Aamal said, that he is not allowed to wear his pistol when he enters the fortified gate of the new American military base next door.
WORLD
October 8, 2004 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
Three months ago, Pvt. Mangawar Khaksar lost his right leg to a grenade explosion while helping the Afghan army intervene in a battle between warlords. On Saturday, he says, he'll hobble to a polling center on his crutches if he has to in order to cast his vote in Afghanistan's first presidential election. He enlisted to unify his shattered nation, and he believes the right to vote is fundamental to its future. "I've sacrificed.
WORLD
February 4, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The U.S. Marines and Afghan army plan a massive assault on Taliban fighters in Marja, the last community under Taliban control in a sprawling, lawless region of Afghanistan once dominated by the insurgency, a top Marine said Wednesday. "We are going to gain control," Col. George "Slam" Amland told reporters. "We are going to alter the ecosystem considerably." Amland, deputy commander of Marine forces in southern Afghanistan, would not discuss the timing of the assault or how many thousands of troops would be involved.
NEWS
February 8, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Afghan army warned residents along the Salang Highway to flee their homes because of fierce fighting expected on the vital supply route between Kabul and the Soviet Union, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported Tuesday. With only one week before the last Soviet troops are due to leave Afghanistan under a peace accord, Tass said Muslim rebels battling the Soviet-backed Kabul government are again attacking food and fuel convoys.
WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Ten members of an Afghan rural paramilitary force and seven others were drugged and killed at an outpost in a volatile eastern province, officials said Wednesday, in the latest deadly poisoning attributed to Taliban insurgents. The killings occurred overnight in a remote district of Ghazni province where villagers last year took up arms against the Taliban. Members of the Afghan Local Police, a U.S.-backed rural guard force made up of village recruits, were poisoned during dinner by a fellow police officer whom officials said had ties to the Taliban, and then were fatally shot by insurgents who overran the outpost, officials said.
WORLD
August 22, 2006 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
This remote village in the high desert of southern Afghanistan is home to six mud huts and 70 people. A few miles away, tucked behind two soaring escarpments, the settlement of Qazi contains four huts, 50 people and a few goats. More than 100 Afghan army soldiers descended on the two villages one day last month looking for Taliban fighters. After a carefully scripted battle plan, the soldiers sealed the villages and searched every hut, shed, paddock and fighting-age male.
NEWS
July 9, 1989 | From Associated Press
The Afghan government reported Saturday that its troops, backed by tanks and artillery, have advanced farther toward the Pakistani border, destroying guerrilla bases and killing 81 insurgents. Foreign Ministry spokesman Mohammed Nabi Amani said the Afghan army, on the fourth day of an offensive, advanced two miles and was 32 miles from the border. Amani said government troops are in complete control of Jalalabad and surrounding hills, giving them a strategic advantage over the rebels.
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