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WORLD
March 1, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The Afghan troops who supported the U.S. Marines in the battle to end Taliban control of this town in Helmand province showed marked improvement over last summer's performance in a similar fight but still need much more training, Marine commanders say. Brig. Gen. Larry Nicholson, the top Marine here, said that overall the Afghan battalions exceeded his expectations. Nicholson said he would give some Afghan units an A-minus or B-plus but that others, particularly those with soldiers fresh from basic training, would get a C-minus or D. The lead Afghan commander, Brig.
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NEWS
August 15, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Sunday completed the withdrawal of half of its troops from Afghanistan, one day before the agreed deadline, the commander of Soviet forces in that country said. Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, speaking at a press conference in Kabul, the Afghan capital, said that none of his forces remain in 25 of Afghanistan's 31 provinces and that the estimated 50,000 Soviet soldiers still in the country will leave over the next six months under terms of a U.N.-sponsored agreement.
WORLD
May 26, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - French President Francois Hollande, on an unannounced visit to Afghanistan, defended France's controversial decision to end its combat role ahead of schedule, and insisted Friday that his government would step up its assistance via other means. The newly inaugurated leader met with President Hamid Karzai and visited French troops, who are mainly deployed in Kapisa province, east of the capital. Early this week at a NATO gathering week in Chicago, Hollande stirred tension among the allies by declaring that he would keep a campaign pledge to pull out French troops by the end of this year, two years before the NATO combat role is to end. Some worry the French stance is widening cracks within the alliance and will lead otherU.S.
WORLD
April 16, 2010 | By Tony Perry
Marine Warrant Officer Jeremy Piasecki is walking amid the war chaos of Helmand province: bullet-riddled buildings, a terrified populace, a junked economy, a government shot through with incompetence and corruption. Naturally, Piasecki's thoughts turn to water polo. Never mind that Afghanistan is a landlocked country, or that most Afghans have never seen a swimming pool. Or that Piasecki's sport is so unknown here that there's no word for it in Pashto or Dari. Those are but trifles to the 31-year-old Marine reservist, who played and coached water polo in Southern California.
WORLD
February 13, 2013 | David S. Cloud
The Pentagon will withdraw about half the 66,000 U.S. troops now in Afghanistan over the coming year, a steep reduction that reflects President Obama's determination to end America's role in the 11-year-old conflict. In his State of the Union address, Obama said 34,000 Americans would be brought home over the next 12 months, and further reductions will continue through the end of 2014, when all U.S. and other foreign troops are scheduled to leave. "American troops will come home from Afghanistan," Obama said.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON -- In his State of the Union speech Tuesday, President Obama will announce plans to withdraw half the U.S. troops deployed in Afghanistan over the next year, a steep reduction that reflects his determination to end the American role in the 11-year-old conflict, a senior administration official said. About 34,000 Americans will be withdrawn over the next 12 months and "further reductions will continue through the end of 2014," when nearly all U.S. troops are scheduled to leave, the official said in a statement released by the White House.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Kremlin probably won't meet the goal of pulling one-fourth of its soldiers out of Afghanistan this month because U.S.-backed guerrillas are overwhelming Afghan troops left behind, Western diplomats said Tuesday. Meanwhile, Kabul Radio reported that guerrillas Tuesday staged rocket attacks on Kabul, the Afghan capital, for the second straight day, killing at least two people.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | BARRY RENFREW, Associated Press
The teen-age army officer quietly pleaded for his life, unable to stop his hands from shaking as he tried to convince his guerrilla interrogators that he was not a Communist. "If God helps, I will be released. If I am not, I will be killed," said the frightened 18-year-old the guerrillas identified as Lt. Nur Mohammed. He had an army crew cut and a smattering of acne. A guerrilla officer listening to him sneered and said he was lying. The guerrilla maintained that Lt.
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WORLD
December 11, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration plans on keeping 6,000 to 9,000 U.S. troops in Afghanistan after 2014, fewer than previously reported, and will confine most of them to fortified garrisons near the capital, leaving Afghan troops largely without American advisors in the field to fight a still-powerful insurgency, U.S. officials said. Although it is not final, contours of the plan have become increasingly clear in the weeks since President Obama's reelection. Officials close to the discussions say the final U.S. presence will be substantially smaller than the 15,000 troops senior commanders have sought to keep after most of the 68,000 remaining American troops leave in the next two years.
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