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NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON -- In his State of the Union speech Tuesday, President Obama will announce plans to withdraw half the U.S. troops deployed in Afghanistan over the next year, a steep reduction that reflects his determination to end the American role in the 11-year-old conflict, a senior administration official said. About 34,000 Americans will be withdrawn over the next 12 months and "further reductions will continue through the end of 2014," when nearly all U.S. troops are scheduled to leave, the official said in a statement released by the White House.
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WORLD
February 27, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash and Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Ten members of an Afghan rural paramilitary force and seven others were drugged and killed at an outpost in a volatile eastern province, officials said Wednesday, in the latest deadly poisoning attributed to Taliban insurgents. The killings occurred overnight in a remote district of Ghazni province where villagers last year took up arms against the Taliban. Members of the Afghan Local Police, a U.S.-backed rural guard force made up of village recruits, were poisoned during dinner by a fellow police officer whom officials said had ties to the Taliban, and then were fatally shot by insurgents who overran the outpost, officials said.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Kremlin probably won't meet the goal of pulling one-fourth of its soldiers out of Afghanistan this month because U.S.-backed guerrillas are overwhelming Afghan troops left behind, Western diplomats said Tuesday. Meanwhile, Kabul Radio reported that guerrillas Tuesday staged rocket attacks on Kabul, the Afghan capital, for the second straight day, killing at least two people.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | BARRY RENFREW, Associated Press
The teen-age army officer quietly pleaded for his life, unable to stop his hands from shaking as he tried to convince his guerrilla interrogators that he was not a Communist. "If God helps, I will be released. If I am not, I will be killed," said the frightened 18-year-old the guerrillas identified as Lt. Nur Mohammed. He had an army crew cut and a smattering of acne. A guerrilla officer listening to him sneered and said he was lying. The guerrilla maintained that Lt.
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WORLD
October 30, 2003 | Paul Watson, Times Staff Writer
Villagers with broken limbs, deep cuts and severe bruises say Afghan militia fighters working as guides for U.S. troops went on a spree of looting, beatings and torture here during a military sweep last week. The militiamen frequently guide the Americans on missions to search for Taliban and Al Qaeda guerrillas, wear U.S. military camouflage fatigues and carry assault rifles. None of about 50 villagers who described the abuses in interviews, or who were questioned at an elders meeting, said U.S.
WORLD
March 2, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Late last year, before leaving Forward Operating Base Tillman for the last time, U.S. troops took apart every inch of the remote outpost near the border with Pakistan, from the dirt-packed barricades to the flat-screen TVs in the intelligence center. Mohibullah Samim, the governor of Paktika province, where the base was located, called it a waste. "I was against dismantling it," Samim said. "It would have been better to hand it over to the Afghan army to keep the border area safe.
NEWS
May 2, 1988 | MICHAEL WINES and JIM MANN, Times Staff Writers
Rebels battling Afghanistan's Soviet-backed regime lost at least $80 million in American and Saudi Arabian-supplied weapons destined for their forces when saboteurs blew up a major arms dump in Rawalpindi, Pakistan, on April 10, U.S. sources say. The blast, which killed 100 Afghan and Pakistani workers and bystanders, destroyed up to 10% of the cash value of U.S. and Saudi arms sent annually to the rebels, the sources said late last week.
WORLD
November 7, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
KANDAHAR, Afghanistan - Army Spc. Steve Beaty was on alert for signs of danger, well aware of a surge in attacks on U.S. troops by Afghans wearing police or army uniforms. The guard approaching him in a bulky coat, hands crossed at his waist, looked suspicious. With the Afghan only 15 feet away, Beaty raised his M-4 rifle. It was then that the guard detonated his suicide vest, shooting ball bearings and shrapnel across a landing zone where two dozen American soldiers, CIA operatives, interpreters and Afghan intelligence officials had just arrived on two helicopters.
WORLD
November 25, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
The U.S. commander in Afghanistan has prepared a request for more troops to serve as advisors for Afghan military units, a sign that Washington and its allies are trying to speed up the hand-over of combat operations to the Afghans as they prepare to withdraw, U.S. and NATO officials said. The stronger emphasis on training may keep more U.S. troops on bases next year and help reduce U.S. military casualties before presidential elections next November. President Obama's Afghan policy is already an issue.
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