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NEWS
October 22, 2012 | By Shashank Bengali
President Obama and Mitt Romney papered over the problems plaguing U.S. efforts to leave behind a stable Afghanistan when NATO combat troops stand down by the end of 2014. And Romney, in essence, endorsed Obama's policies. “We've seen progress over the past several years,” Romney said during Monday's presidential debate. Referring to Obama's decision to add 33,000 U.S. troops, Romney said, “The surge has been successful, and the training program is proceeding at pace.” However, the debate ignored the growing problem of Afghan soldiers turning on those trainers, who include American soldiers.
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NEWS
August 15, 1988 | MICHAEL PARKS, Times Staff Writer
The Soviet Union on Sunday completed the withdrawal of half of its troops from Afghanistan, one day before the agreed deadline, the commander of Soviet forces in that country said. Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, speaking at a press conference in Kabul, the Afghan capital, said that none of his forces remain in 25 of Afghanistan's 31 provinces and that the estimated 50,000 Soviet soldiers still in the country will leave over the next six months under terms of a U.N.-sponsored agreement.
WORLD
February 12, 2010 | By Tony Perry
The Marines of Charlie Company had just landed outside Marja and were itching for the fight with the Taliban when they learned that a group of Afghans with shovels and wheelbarrows were digging holes in the road nearby. Were they planting explosives? You could never be certain, but the reconnaissance drones overhead thought so. Approval was given to fire a rocket at the men. The rocket strike caused a thunderous explosion. The men dug their holes no more. "It was pretty motivating," said Cpl. Jonathan Lee, 30, of Orange Park, Fla. -- Before the Marines from the 1st Battalion, 3rd Regiment moved to take over a key westbound route to Marja called Five Points, they were given a lecture by a combat lawyer about the rules of engagement, the strictures that determine when it's lawful for a Marine to fire a weapon.
WORLD
April 16, 2010 | By Tony Perry
Marine Warrant Officer Jeremy Piasecki is walking amid the war chaos of Helmand province: bullet-riddled buildings, a terrified populace, a junked economy, a government shot through with incompetence and corruption. Naturally, Piasecki's thoughts turn to water polo. Never mind that Afghanistan is a landlocked country, or that most Afghans have never seen a swimming pool. Or that Piasecki's sport is so unknown here that there's no word for it in Pashto or Dari. Those are but trifles to the 31-year-old Marine reservist, who played and coached water polo in Southern California.
WORLD
February 13, 2013 | David S. Cloud
The Pentagon will withdraw about half the 66,000 U.S. troops now in Afghanistan over the coming year, a steep reduction that reflects President Obama's determination to end America's role in the 11-year-old conflict. In his State of the Union address, Obama said 34,000 Americans would be brought home over the next 12 months, and further reductions will continue through the end of 2014, when all U.S. and other foreign troops are scheduled to leave. "American troops will come home from Afghanistan," Obama said.
NEWS
February 12, 2013 | By David S. Cloud
WASHINGTON -- In his State of the Union speech Tuesday, President Obama will announce plans to withdraw half the U.S. troops deployed in Afghanistan over the next year, a steep reduction that reflects his determination to end the American role in the 11-year-old conflict, a senior administration official said. About 34,000 Americans will be withdrawn over the next 12 months and "further reductions will continue through the end of 2014," when nearly all U.S. troops are scheduled to leave, the official said in a statement released by the White House.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Kremlin probably won't meet the goal of pulling one-fourth of its soldiers out of Afghanistan this month because U.S.-backed guerrillas are overwhelming Afghan troops left behind, Western diplomats said Tuesday. Meanwhile, Kabul Radio reported that guerrillas Tuesday staged rocket attacks on Kabul, the Afghan capital, for the second straight day, killing at least two people.
NEWS
December 8, 1985 | BARRY RENFREW, Associated Press
The teen-age army officer quietly pleaded for his life, unable to stop his hands from shaking as he tried to convince his guerrilla interrogators that he was not a Communist. "If God helps, I will be released. If I am not, I will be killed," said the frightened 18-year-old the guerrillas identified as Lt. Nur Mohammed. He had an army crew cut and a smattering of acne. A guerrilla officer listening to him sneered and said he was lying. The guerrilla maintained that Lt.
ENTERTAINMENT
January 4, 2011
SERIES Live to Dance: "American Idol's" Paula Abdul mentors a new batch of contestants on the premiere this talent competition (8 p.m. CBS). The Biggest Loser: The weight-loss competition returns for another go-round (8 p.m. NBC). Nova: The science series journeys to Antarctica to uncover "Secrets Beneath the Ice" (8 and 10 p.m. KOCE). V: The alien-invasion thriller starring Scott Wolf, Elizabeth Mitchell and Morena Baccarin returns (9 p.m. ABC). 16 and Pregnant: This episode catches viewers up with some of the teens featured on the docu-series (10 p.m. MTV)
WORLD
February 3, 2010 | By Tony Perry
U.S. Marines and the Afghan army plan a major assault on Taliban fighters in Marja, the last main community under the militants' control in what had been a largely lawless area of the Helmand River Valley, a top Marine said Wednesday. "We are going to gain control," Col. George "Slam" Amland told reporters. "We are going to alter the ecosystem considerably." Amland, deputy commander of Marine forces in southern Afghanistan, would not discuss the timing of the assault or how many thousands of troops would be involved.
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