Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAfghan Border
IN THE NEWS

Afghan Border

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
March 28, 2009 | Zulfiqar Ali and Laura King
A suicide bombing destroyed a mosque in Pakistan near the Afghan border Friday, killing at least 50 people and wounding more than 100, officials and witnesses said. Scores of people were missing in the rubble. The attack, near the town of Jamrud in the Khyber tribal area, came on the holiest day of the Muslim week, as the mosque was packed with worshipers. In the aftermath of the blast, prayer caps, cellphones and sandals lay scattered on the rocky ground.
ARTICLES BY DATE
WORLD
November 30, 2012 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
NAQI KHAIL, Afghanistan - The minivan taxi crossed a river, then jostled and bumped on an unpaved road. The border policeman sat with the ordinary passengers; his buddy lay in a coffin fastened to the roof, "Praised be God for Zabiulla" written on the wood. The others got off at a bus station, and the taxi, the policeman and the coffin continued along the main road in northeastern Afghanistan's Kapisa province. In each village they stopped at, nobody knew the dead man. It was 4 p.m. when the taxi pulled up next to the Naqi Khail primary school and a store with a rusty metal machine that churned out vanilla soft-serve ice cream.
Advertisement
WORLD
July 28, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani state television said a missile attack near the Afghan border killed six people today. It said the missiles hit Azam Warsak village in South Waziristan. It didn't identify the victims or its source, or say who fired the missiles. But an intelligence official, who declined to be identified, said the dead were three foreigners and three local tribesmen. Residents said they heard the sound of a drone aircraft, suggesting the missile may have been fired by a U.S.-controlled unmanned Predator.
WORLD
June 12, 2012 | By David S. Cloud and Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The United States and Pakistan had nearly completed a deal to reopen crucial NATO supply routes into Afghanistan, officials from both countries said, when Defense Secretary Leon E. Panetta harshly criticized Islamabad last week for allowing militants to mount cross-border attacks from its territory. And with that, new problems erupted. U.S. and Pakistani negotiators had been putting the final touches on the agreement when Panetta, speaking in Kabul on Thursday, said the U.S. was "reaching the limits of our patience" over Islamabad's failure to root out Afghan insurgents in its tribal areas, the officials said.
NEWS
April 22, 1987 | United Press International
The Soviets have launched military operations to wipe out settlements in northern Afghanistan near their border in retaliation for Muslim rebel attacks on Soviet territory, a Western diplomat said Tuesday. The diplomat, speaking on the condition he not be identified, also reported heavy fighting last week in at least four other provinces. The information could not be verified independently.
NEWS
September 13, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
More than 200,000 soldiers will participate in military maneuvers late this month near the border with Afghanistan, Iranian television reported Saturday. The maneuvers, which would be the second such show of force in less than a month, follow an admission by Afghanistan's Taliban rulers that its soldiers killed nine Iranian diplomats last month after seizing a rebel stronghold. Iranian authorities have taken an increasingly firm tone toward the Taliban, which controls about 90% of Afghanistan.
NEWS
October 16, 1986 | JAMES GERSTENZANG, Times Staff Writer
The United States is considering selling sophisticated early warning planes to Pakistan and temporarily sending U.S. planes to patrol near the tense border with Afghanistan, U.S. and Pakistani officials said Wednesday. President Zia ul-Haq said in an interview that he wants the airborne warning systems, as well as the temporary help from the U.S. Air Force.
NEWS
October 11, 2001 | HENRY CHU, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Fearing refugees and unrest on its western fringe, China has sealed off its tiny border with Afghanistan, a state-run newspaper reported here Wednesday. The move, which took place Monday, followed similar action by Pakistan and Iran, other neighbors of Afghanistan that have closed off their borders to a growing tide of Afghan refugees fleeing famine, civil war and U.S.-led airstrikes in their homeland.
WORLD
December 28, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The death squad shows up in uniform: black masks and tunics with the name of the group, Khorasan Mujahedin, scrawled across the back in Urdu. Pulling up in caravans of Toyota Corolla hatchbacks, dozens of them seal off mud-hut villages near the Afghan border, and then scour markets and homes in search of tribesmen they suspect of helping to identify targets for the armed U.S. drones that routinely buzz overhead. Once they've snatched their suspect, they don't speed off, villagers say. Instead, the caravan leaves slowly, a trademark gesture meant to convey that they expect no retaliation.
WORLD
July 9, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez and Zulfiqar Ali, Los Angeles Times
Suicide bomb explosions tore through a busy market Friday in a volatile tribal region of Pakistan, killing more than 65 people in an attack that illustrated the Taliban's potency despite several recent military offensives against the insurgents. The blasts took place in the village of Yakka Ghund outside the offices of a senior administrator for the Mohmand tribal region, police said. At least 112 people were injured. Authorities said one of the bombers was on a motorcycle and the other detonated a Toyota Corolla sedan filled with explosives.
WORLD
May 22, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - As U.S. frustration with Pakistan's six-month blockade of Afghanistan-bound supplies became painfully apparent Monday at the NATO summit in Chicago, Pakistanis are growing worried that their government's negotiating strategy could cost their country millions of dollars in American aid and jeopardize its prospects for a voice in Afghanistan's postwar future. For weeks, U.S. and Pakistani officials have been negotiating a new set of transit fees that would pave the way for the reopening of routes that NATO convoys used to ferry fuel and nonlethal supplies from the southern port of Karachi to the Afghan border.
WORLD
December 28, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
The death squad shows up in uniform: black masks and tunics with the name of the group, Khorasan Mujahedin, scrawled across the back in Urdu. Pulling up in caravans of Toyota Corolla hatchbacks, dozens of them seal off mud-hut villages near the Afghan border, and then scour markets and homes in search of tribesmen they suspect of helping to identify targets for the armed U.S. drones that routinely buzz overhead. Once they've snatched their suspect, they don't speed off, villagers say. Instead, the caravan leaves slowly, a trademark gesture meant to convey that they expect no retaliation.
WORLD
December 15, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Los Angeles Times
Pakistani officials acknowledged Thursday that their troops fired machine guns and artillery in the direction of U.S. helicopters that were attacking them in a deadly incident on the Afghan-Pakistani border last month, but they said the Americans fired first, and they insisted that no militants were in the area. The U.S. is investigating the Nov. 26 incident, in which 24 soldiers were killed, the deadliest single toll of Pakistani forces slain by NATO troops since the Afghanistan conflict began 10 years ago. Presenting their version of events to reporters at their embassy in Washington, Pakistani defense officials and diplomats reiterated their claim that U.S. attack helicopters continued to strafe two Pakistani outposts for at least an hour after NATO had been notified that it was attacking friendly forces.
WORLD
December 2, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan and the United States have been here before: a crisis followed by saber rattling, recriminations — and moves behind the scenes to patch things up. This time feels different. The rage coursing through Pakistani society over the Nov. 26 airstrike that killed 24 Pakistani soldiers suggests there may be permanent damage to a relationship already scarred this year by the killing of two Pakistani men by a CIA contractor, and by the U.S. commando raid that killed Osama bin Laden.
WORLD
November 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Allegations that a NATO attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers near the Afghan border Saturday dealt a serious blow to already tense relations between Washington and Islamabad at a time when the U.S. needs Pakistan's cooperation in engineering a peaceful resolution to the 10-year war in Afghanistan. If confirmed, the NATO helicopter and fighter jet attack would be the deadliest ever involving Pakistani security forces. In response, Pakistan shut down crucial border crossings used by convoys delivering supplies to NATO forces in Afghanistan and gave the U.S. 15 days to vacate an air base in southern Pakistan that in the past had been suspected as a launchpad for CIA drone attacks.
WORLD
October 2, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Aimal Yaqubi, Los Angeles Times
Pakistan's Foreign Ministry on Sunday strongly rejected claims that the nation's premier spy agency was involved in the assassination of Afghanistan's chief negotiator with the Taliban. Afghan and U.S. officials have been increasing pressure on Pakistan's Inter-Services Intelligence agency, or ISI, to sever its ties with the Haqqani network, an affiliate of the Afghan Taliban regarded by Washington as the most dangerous security threat to U.S., NATO and Afghan forces in Afghanistan.
WORLD
November 26, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Allegations that a NATO attack killed 24 Pakistani soldiers near the Afghan border Saturday dealt a serious blow to already tense relations between Washington and Islamabad at a time when the U.S. needs Pakistan's cooperation in engineering a peaceful resolution to the 10-year war in Afghanistan. If confirmed, the NATO helicopter and fighter jet attack would be the deadliest ever involving Pakistani security forces. In response, Pakistan shut down crucial border crossings used by convoys delivering supplies to NATO forces in Afghanistan and gave the U.S. 15 days to vacate an air base in southern Pakistan that in the past had been suspected as a launchpad for CIA drone attacks.
WORLD
September 29, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
Pakistani political leaders meeting Thursday in the capital denounced U.S. allegations that the country's premier spy agency assisted insurgents in attacking American targets in Afghanistan, but also stressed the need to keep lines of communication open with Washington. The meeting of more than 50 politicians from a broad spectrum of parties, along with military and intelligence chiefs, was meant to convey Pakistan's unity amid fear that the United States will attack tribal areas along the Afghan border where Afghan Taliban militants maintain strongholds.
WORLD
September 5, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A decade ago, Peshawar's bomb squad had it pretty easy. Occasionally, one of its 20 members would be dispatched to a cornfield to defuse a mine planted by a villager who was feuding with his neighbor. Bombs were small and crude; the only tools an officer needed were pliers and a roll of electrical tape. Because their budget was minuscule, the officers traveled by taxi. Today, the squad careens through week after week of carnage and peril in this volatile city near the Afghan border.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|