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Afghan Border

WORLD
October 20, 2008 | From Times Wire Reports
Pakistani forces killed as many as 30 militants near the Afghan border as the region's chief minister told a U.S. diplomat that he wanted to resolve problems there through dialogue. U.S. Assistant Secretary of State Richard Boucher traveled to the city of Peshawar to meet North-West Frontier Province chief Amir Haider Khan Hoti, according to a statement from Hoti. The visit comes amid strains between the nations over apparent U.S. missile attacks on militant targets on the Pakistani side of the border.
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WORLD
November 30, 2008 | Times Wire Reports
What was believed to be a U.S. drone aircraft fired a missile at a house in the militancy-plagued Pakistani region of North Waziristan on the Afghan border, killing two people, security agency officials said. A security agent and a Taliban militant confirmed the strike and the death toll at the house in the village of Chashma. There was no immediate information about the identity of those killed. Security has deteriorated sharply in both Pakistan and Afghanistan, seven years after U.S. soldiers and their Afghan allies drove the Taliban from power in Afghanistan in the weeks after the Sept.
WORLD
August 22, 2009 | Times Wire Reports
A U.S. missile strike targeted a Taliban commander blamed for masterminding ambushes on American troops in Afghanistan, the latest assault by unmanned aircraft in northwestern Pakistan, intelligence officials said. It was unclear whether Siraj Haqqani, who also has close ties to Al Qaeda, was among the 12 people killed in the house in North Waziristan near the Afghan border, the officials said. Siraj is the son of senior Taliban leader Jalaluddin Haqqani, who was supported by U.S. and Pakistani aid when he fought in the 1980s against Soviet troops occupying Afghanistan.
WORLD
September 5, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
A decade ago, Peshawar's bomb squad had it pretty easy. Occasionally, one of its 20 members would be dispatched to a cornfield to defuse a mine planted by a villager who was feuding with his neighbor. Bombs were small and crude; the only tools an officer needed were pliers and a roll of electrical tape. Because their budget was minuscule, the officers traveled by taxi. Today, the squad careens through week after week of carnage and peril in this volatile city near the Afghan border.
NEWS
November 23, 1986 | Associated Press
Five Soviet army deserters have been brought to Canada in a secret government mission after being held captive by Afghan rebels for about three years, it was reported Saturday. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney confirmed that the five are "safe and sound" in Canada, and said further information would be released this week. Officials said Canadian officials will speak to Soviet diplomats about the mission.
WORLD
May 22, 2012 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
ISLAMABAD, Pakistan - As U.S. frustration with Pakistan's six-month blockade of Afghanistan-bound supplies became painfully apparent Monday at the NATO summit in Chicago, Pakistanis are growing worried that their government's negotiating strategy could cost their country millions of dollars in American aid and jeopardize its prospects for a voice in Afghanistan's postwar future. For weeks, U.S. and Pakistani officials have been negotiating a new set of transit fees that would pave the way for the reopening of routes that NATO convoys used to ferry fuel and nonlethal supplies from the southern port of Karachi to the Afghan border.
WORLD
April 6, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
Taliban militants reeling from American and Pakistani attacks launched a sophisticated raid on the heavily guarded U.S. Consulate in Peshawar on Monday, killing at least five security personnel in suicide bomb blasts and barrages of grenades and automatic gunfire. The midday attack failed to penetrate the facility in the volatile city near the Afghan border, and none of the staff members were injured or killed. The consulate is instrumental in channeling millions of dollars in U.S. aid into Pakistan's impoverished tribal areas and the Swat Valley region, part of Washington's long-term strategy aimed at eliminating support for the Taliban.
WORLD
October 28, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez, Los Angeles Times
To find the office of the prosecutor in charge of putting Islamabad's bomb builders and terrorist masterminds behind bars, visitors must wend their way through the midday bustle of shoppers and descend into a dingy basement alcove, next to the Valley Tour travel agency. There, Mohammed Tayyab will confess that he isn't at all proud of his track record. He has handled 45 cases in the last year. He has won just four. "It's very low ? I admit it," Tayyab says, heaving a sigh.
NEWS
January 18, 1987 | Associated Press
Afghan guerrilla leaders, cheered by a crowd shouting "Death to the Russians," vowed Saturday to step up their war against the Communist regime in their homeland and said they will form a provisional Afghan government. They formally rejected the cease-fire declared by the Soviet-backed Kabul government, denouncing this and the government's national reconciliation offer as a ploy to legitimize Soviet control of their country.
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