Advertisement
 
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAfghan Capital
IN THE NEWS

Afghan Capital

WORLD
July 18, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A new U.S. commander, Gen. John Allen, formally took control of the war in Afghanistan on Monday, inheriting a nearly decade-long conflict that has cost the lives of at least 1,667 American troops. Allen succeeds Gen. David H. Petraeus, who is leaving to head the CIA. Petraeus had been in command for only a year, hastily taking the helm after President Obama fired Gen. Stanley McChrystal after Rolling Stone magazine reported intemperate comments by his staff about the administration's civilian leadership.
Advertisement
WORLD
June 29, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
A team of gunmen and suicide bombers struck a landmark hotel in the Afghan capital Tuesday evening, police said, killing up to six people in the hotel and setting off an hours-long battle that ended only after NATO helicopters swooped in to help. It was the latest — and by far the most dramatic — in a series of attacks that have underscored the insurgents' ability to penetrate even Kabul's most heavily guarded installations, raising troubling new questions about the Afghan forces' ability to take over responsibility for safeguarding the country.
WORLD
April 3, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Violent repercussions of a Koran-burning at an obscure Florida evangelical church shook Afghanistan again Saturday, with authorities in the southern city of Kandahar reporting nine people killed in furious street protests. A day after an attack on the U.N. headquarters in a northern city left seven foreigners dead, rioters rampaged in Kandahar, the city that the Taliban movement considers its spiritual home. Demonstrators torched cars, smashed windows and occupied a school building, a provincial spokesman said.
WORLD
April 2, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Violent repercussions of a Koran-burning at an obscure Florida evangelical church shook Afghanistan again Saturday, with authorities in the southern city of Kandahar reporting up to eight deaths in an angry street protest a day after an attack on the U.N. headquarters in a northern city left seven foreigners dead. Nerves were further jangled in the Afghan capital when a team of gunmen and at least one suicide bomber tried to storm an American-run military installation on Kabul's outskirts early Saturday.
WORLD
February 16, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
One is a barely pubescent girl, forced to wed a much older man to pay a family debt. Another is a scarred and bruised mother of four, so traumatized by her husband's beatings that she trembles whenever anyone speaks to her. A third is a spirited young woman marked for death by her brothers and father when she tried to run away with the man she wanted to marry. All found sanctuary at a shelter in the Afghan capital run by a privately funded women's group. But this fragile haven and others like it are threatened by a plan, laid out publicly Tuesday for the first time by the administration of President Hamid Karzai, to bring all such facilities under strict government control.
WORLD
January 29, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
In a grim demonstration of insurgents' ability to strike even in tightly guarded districts, a suicide bomber blew himself up in a supermarket in a wealthy enclave of the Afghan capital on Friday, killing at least eight people, including three foreign women and a child, and injuring more than a dozen others, police said. The Taliban claimed responsibility, declaring that the attack had been aimed at foreigners, in particular the head of a Western security firm. The bombing, the deadliest attack in Kabul in nearly a year, gutted the ground floor of the store, igniting small fires, splintering storefront windows, collapsing shelves and leaving the floor strewn with a jumble of canned goods, cookies and cereal.
WORLD
January 28, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A powerful blast tore through a supermarket popular with foreigners in the Afghan capital Friday, and police said at least eight people were killed and a dozen hurt. The neighborhood is home to a number of Western embassies and other international organizations, and the attack was an ominous sign that insurgents remain able to penetrate the most tightly guarded districts of Kabul. Witnesses said some foreigners appeared to be among the dead and injured, and the Reuters news agency said one of those killed was a child.
WORLD
December 15, 2010 | By Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
Richard C. Holbrooke is being praised in the United States after his death as a giant of diplomacy, but in South Asia, the turbulent region that constituted his last assignment, his legacy received mixed reviews. In Kabul, he was regarded as out of touch with the society and too combative to forge a meaningful partnership with Afghanistan's leadership. But in Islamabad, Pakistan, he was lauded as a seasoned envoy who earnestly tried to strengthen Washington's fragile alliance with the country.
WORLD
November 8, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
The bodies of five more of the Afghan police officers captured last week by the Taliban in a rural district have been recovered, and Afghan officials said Sunday that the men were brutally slain. The grisly discovery brought to nine the number of confirmed deaths among a group of 16 officers who disappeared when the Taliban overran the Khogyani district of Ghazni province in the early hours of Nov. 1. A Taliban spokesman asserted at the time that the men had willingly joined the insurgency ?
WORLD
September 16, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
In Afghanistan these days, the definition of success is sometimes merely the absence of calamity — a metric that may well apply to this weekend's parliamentary elections. Threats and intimidation are certain to diminish turnout in Saturday's vote. More than 1 million voters in this nation of 32 million are being disenfranchised because they live in areas deemed too dangerous for balloting to take place. Thousands of phony voter-registration cards are known to be in circulation, raising the specter of widespread fraud.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|