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Afghan Capital

WORLD
January 19, 2010 | By Alex Rodriguez
As their target, they selected the hub of Afghan governance, a part of downtown Kabul that includes the presidential palace, the Justice Ministry, the central bank and other heavily guarded buildings. Then, on Monday morning, as the heart of the capital bustled with shoppers and Afghans on their way to work, seven Taliban militants with AK-47 assault rifles, grenades, rocket launchers and suicide vests hidden under their shawls unleashed their attack. The militants left five people dead and laid bare Kabul's vulnerability even as the U.S. ratchets up the war to rout the militancy.
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WORLD
January 18, 2010 | Times staff and wire reports
KABUL — Taliban militants struck in the heart of the Afghan capital today, launching suicide attacks on key government targets in a clear sign the insurgents plan to escalate their fight as the U.S. and its allies ramp up a campaign to end the war. At least five people, including a child, were killed and nearly 40 wounded, officials said. The Defense Ministry said seven attackers also had been killed. After a series of blasts and more than three hours of subsequent gunfights outside several ministries and inside a shopping mall, President Hamid Karzai said security had been restored to the capital, though search operations continued amid reports that more attackers were hiding in the city.
WORLD
January 8, 2010 | By Laura King
In a rising tide of violence in Afghanistan's east, a suicide bomber struck a crowded urban marketplace Thursday, killing at least nine people, and another blast rocked a provincial governor's compound, injuring him and several aides. In the east's main city of Jalalabad, meanwhile, about 5,000 demonstrators shouted anti-U.S. slogans while protesting the deaths of several children in a blast a day earlier. Afghan authorities said the blast was caused by a land mine that went off when a police vehicle ran over it; the NATO-led force said the cause of the explosion, which also injured nine Western troops, was under investigation.
WORLD
December 16, 2009 | By Laura King
With political tensions running high in advance of President Hamid Karzai's expected announcement this week of his new Cabinet, a suicide car bomber struck in the heart of Afghanistan's capital on Tuesday, killing eight people and injuring more than 40 others. Officials said the target may have been former Vice President Ahmed Zia Massoud, whose house was heavily damaged in the attack. Massoud is the brother of Ahmed Shah Massoud, a much-revered leader of the anti-Taliban resistance who was assassinated in 2001, just before the Sept.
WORLD
November 18, 2009 | By Laura King
Secretary of State Hillary Clinton arrived today in Afghanistan, pressing U.S. calls for reform in President Hamid Karzai's government on the eve of his inauguration to another term. Clinton, whose visit was not publicly disclosed for security reasons until after she landed in the Afghan capital, was dining with Karzai at the presidential palace, where Thursday's swearing-in is to take place. Karzai is under intense Western pressure to stem corruption and graft in his government.
WORLD
November 13, 2009 | Laura King
An apparent suicide bombing outside a major U.S. military base in the Afghan capital killed at least two Afghans early today, witnesses and officials said. The attack took place on a main road at the eastern edge of Kabul, outside an installation known as Camp Phoenix. Witnesses said it appeared that at least two military vehicles were caught in the blast. American military officials did not immediately confirm whether there were military casualties, and provided no other details about the attack.
WORLD
October 19, 2009 | Peter Nicholas and Laura King
Before President Obama commits additional troops to Afghanistan, the U.S. needs assurances that Afghan leaders preside over a stable government that is legitimate in the eyes of its citizens, top Democratic officials said in TV appearances Sunday. White House Chief of Staff Rahm Emanuel, appearing on CNN's "State of the Union," said the overriding question facing the Obama administration is whether it has "a credible Afghan partner for this process that can provide the security and the type of services that the Afghan people need."
WORLD
October 9, 2009 | M. Karim Faiez and Mark Magnier
The Indian Embassy in Afghanistan's capital came under attack Thursday for the second time in 15 months as a powerful bomb exploded along an exterior wall, killing 17 police officers and civilians, wounding 76 people and destroying vehicles and buildings. The Taliban claimed responsibility for the suicide attack, which occurred in a heavily fortified area about 8:30 a.m. This latest blast in Kabul underscored the point, analysts said, that militants can strike at will even in Afghanistan's most secure areas.
WORLD
October 8, 2009 | Christi Parsons
President Obama shifted his focus to Pakistan on Wednesday as his advisors dug more deeply into their reassessment of U.S. strategy for neighboring Afghanistan and approached the question of whether to further increase troop strength there. Eight years to the day after the Afghanistan war began, the president was reviewing a recommendation from his commander there, Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal, that suggests a range of troop increases depending on the strategy chosen. White House officials say Obama is weeks away from a decision.
WORLD
September 18, 2009 | Mark Magnier
A car bomb hit an Italian military convoy on the main airport road near the U.S. Embassy in Kabul on Thursday, killing at least six soldiers and 10 Afghan civilians, Italian and Afghan government officials said. The bombing, which wounded at least 52 people, was the latest in a string of attacks and showed militants' ability to hit most corners of the troubled country at will. It was the fourth major blast in the capital in five weeks. Afghanistan's Aug. 20 presidential election remains undecided as authorities attempt to sort out hundreds of allegations of fraud.
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