Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAfghan Police
IN THE NEWS

Afghan Police

WORLD
January 21, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - At least two police officers were killed Monday when five gunmen armed with suicide vests and rocket-propelled grenades stormed the headquarters of the Kabul traffic police department, setting off a firefight that lasted more than eight hours, Afghan officials said. It was the second brazen assault in less than a week in the Afghan capital, which has enjoyed a measure of safety compared with other parts of the country in recent years. The national intelligence agency was attacked Wednesday.
Advertisement
WORLD
January 20, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Gunmen armed with suicide vests stormed the headquarters of the Kabul traffic department before dawn Monday, setting off a firefight that continued hours later, officials said. Initial reports indicated that at least 10 people were injured, including four police officers and six civilians, said Gen. Mohammad Ayob Salangi, the city's police chief. The assault began about 5:30 a.m., when one of the assailants blew himself up at the entrance gate to the compound in western Kabul, Salangi said in a statement.
WORLD
December 10, 2012 | By David Zucchino and Hashmat Baktash, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - American and Afghan forces rescued an American doctor who had been kidnapped by the Taliban in eastern Afghanistan, military authorities announced Sunday. Officials in Washington later confirmed that one of the rescuers was killed in the operation. The doctor, identified as Dilip Joseph, a U.S. citizen working for a nonprofit group based in Colorado, was rescued along with two Afghan colleagues and an Afghan driver, according to international forces and local officials.
WORLD
December 9, 2012 | By David Zucchino and Hashmat Baktash
Kabul - American and Afghan military forces rescued an American doctor early Sunday who had been kidnapped by the Taliban in eastern Afghanistan, military authorities announced. The doctor, identified as Dilip Joseph, an American citizen working for a nonprofit based in Colorado, was rescued along with two Afghan doctors and an Afghan driver, according to international forces and local Afghan officials. The doctors and driver were abducted by gunmen Wednesday afternoon after they had visited a rural clinic in the village of Jad Dalak in the Sorobi district of Kabul province, east of the capital, said Hazrat Mohammed Haqbin, the district governor.
WORLD
November 30, 2012 | By Ned Parker, Los Angeles Times
NAQI KHAIL, Afghanistan - The minivan taxi crossed a river, then jostled and bumped on an unpaved road. The border policeman sat with the ordinary passengers; his buddy lay in a coffin fastened to the roof, "Praised be God for Zabiulla" written on the wood. The others got off at a bus station, and the taxi, the policeman and the coffin continued along the main road in northeastern Afghanistan's Kapisa province. In each village they stopped at, nobody knew the dead man. It was 4 p.m. when the taxi pulled up next to the Naqi Khail primary school and a store with a rusty metal machine that churned out vanilla soft-serve ice cream.
NATIONAL
November 11, 2012 | By Kim Murphy
JOINT BASE LEWIS-McCHORD, Wash. - Testimony in the preliminary hearing for U.S. Army Staff Sgt. Robert Bales wound up Sunday night with a senior Afghan police investigator saying he did not believe Bales could have killed 16 people in two separate villages by himself. Maj. Khudai Dad, chief of criminal techniques for the Afghan police in the province of Kandahar, said he walked the area between three housing compounds hit by a gunman on the night of March 11 and doubted that any single person could have killed so many people in such a wide area in the space of three hours.
WORLD
October 22, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - After years of comings and goings, almost everything about leaving Kabul is familiar: the ride through dusty dawn streets, skirting past old men on bicycles and boys in horse-drawn carts, the long airport trudge through four luggage screenings and pat-downs, the way the plane's wingtips seem to almost scrape the jagged peaks surrounding the city. Everything is the same - but the knowledge that this is the last time. Kabul has been home for more than three years, but on this trip my assignment as a foreign correspondent here is ending, and I will join the American exodus from its long war in Afghanistan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
September 23, 2012 | By Louis Sahagun, Los Angeles Times
As a senior in high school, Scott E. Dickinson liked to daydream about owning a shiny red Ferrari and real estate with sweeping views of the Southern California coastline. But his dreams did not include a college education. "He was just floating through life," recalled his mother, Pauline Dickinson. "He didn't even want to get up in the morning, let alone get dirty or sweat or suffer under any circumstances. " Dickinson got lots of tough love at home. But his parents were so concerned that they prayed he would find a direction in life.
WORLD
September 18, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Across Afghanistan, at combat outposts in the wind-scoured desert and the jagged mountains, it was daily routine: A small group of Afghan police or soldiers and Western ground troops would gather their gear and set out together on a foot patrol or a village visit. Until now. In its most sweeping response yet to "insider" shootings that have seen 51 Western troops killed this year by Afghans in uniform, the NATO force is halting, at least temporarily, joint patrols and other small-unit ground operations by Afghan and foreign troops unless specifically approved by a high-ranking regional commander, military officials said Tuesday.
WORLD
September 16, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - In a disastrous day for the NATO force in Afghanistan, four American troops were gunned down Sunday by Afghan police, a U.S. airstrike killed eight Afghan women foraging for fuel on a rural hillside, and military officials disclosed that a Taliban strike on a southern base had destroyed more than $150 million worth of planes and equipment - in money terms, by far the costliest single insurgent attack in 11 years of warfare....
Los Angeles Times Articles
|