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Afghan Security Forces

WORLD
April 30, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Taliban declared the start of a spring offensive in Afghanistan on Saturday, warning they plan to attack foreign troops, Afghan security forces and government officials in coming days. In a statement, the Taliban warned Afghan civilians to avoid public gatherings, military bases and convoys, as well as Afghan government centers, all of which insurgents plan to attack. The statement comes a day after senior military officials and Western diplomats warned of a surge in militant attacks during the coming week.
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NEWS
August 27, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Massive explosions tore through an army ammunition depot in Kabul, Afghanistan, early today, lighting the sky with flames that rose more than 1,000 feet high, Western diplomatic sources said. There was no immediate word on casualties, according to the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity. State-run Kabul Radio reported that the explosions were the result of an accident, the sources said. But Western sources said Muslim rebels may have been responsible.
WORLD
February 23, 2013 | By Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghan security forces foiled an apparent suicide bomber in central Kabul on Sunday morning but attackers struck police and intelligence offices in two other eastern cities, killing three people, officials said. Officers with the National Directorate of Security shot and killed a suicide bomber who was driving a sport-utility vehicle packed with explosives on a road leading to one of the intelligence agency's offices in Kabul's Wazir Akbar Khan neighborhood, officials said.
WORLD
February 10, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. took over Sunday as the newest and probably last U.S. commander in Afghanistan, tasked with ending America's longest war even as insurgents continue to challenge the U.S.-backed Afghan government. Dunford, a four-star Marine officer, arrives as the U.S.-led NATO coalition has dismantled three-quarters of its 800 bases and watches to see whether the Afghan security forces it trained can keep the Taliban insurgency at bay. A ceremony inside the coalition's heavily guarded compound in Kabul marked the end of the 19-month tenure of Gen. John R. Allen, whose command was marred by a rash of deadly “insider” attacks by Afghan forces against their U.S. and NATO trainers and strained relations with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
WORLD
August 20, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - They've been cut down while working out in makeshift gyms, as they bedded down for the night in remote combat outposts, after shrugging off heavy packs and sweat-soaked body armor when they returned from patrol. At the height of this dusty summer, American troops are dying at unprecedented rates at the hands of their Afghan allies. And both sides are struggling to explain why, even as they search for ways to stem what are known in military parlance as "insider" attacks.
WORLD
October 4, 2010 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Moving to enforce a pledge that has rattled Afghanistan's foreign community, President Hamid Karzai has begun dissolving the Afghan operations of private security companies, including the firm formerly known as Blackwater, the government announced Sunday. Karzai caught Western officials by surprise in mid-August when he announced a ban on private security firms that would take effect by year's end. The U.S. Embassy at the time expressed support in principle but suggested the timetable was unrealistic.
WORLD
August 17, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration plans to double the size of a rural police force in Afghanistan and arm it with heavier weapons to fight insurgents as U.S. troops withdraw, despite Pentagon and Afghan government concern about the village self-defense units becoming predatory criminal gangs or defecting to the Taliban. The danger was highlighted Friday when a new member of the Afghan Local Police shot and killed two U.S. special operations troops and wounded a third moments after they gave him his service weapon during a ceremony for new recruits in the western province of Farah.
WORLD
December 2, 2009
President Obama's decision to send 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan pleased many military officials, who said they believe the bolstered forces will be able to execute a more robust counterinsurgency strategy. With two decisions to increase troop levels this year, Obama has nearly doubled American combat power in Afghanistan, Pentagon officials noted Tuesday. And while Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal did not get the 40,000 additional troops he reportedly requested, one Defense official said McChrystal would not have to scale back any of his plans to take on Taliban forces in eastern and southern Afghanistan.
WORLD
May 1, 2011 | By Molly Hennessy-Fiske, Los Angeles Times
The Taliban on Saturday declared the start of a spring offensive in Afghanistan, warning that insurgents plan to attack foreign troops, Afghan security forces and government officials in coming days. In a statement, the Taliban warned civilians to avoid public gatherings, military bases and convoys, as well as government buildings. "All Afghan people should bear in mind to keep away from gatherings, convoys and centers of the enemy so that they will not become harmed during attacks of mujahedin against the enemy," the statement said.
WORLD
January 27, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Two police officers including a district commander died in a bombing Sunday near Afghanistan's border with Iran, part of a rash of attacks that killed at least 21 officers in 24 hours, Afghan officials said. The officers were patrolling in the Qala-e-Kah district of Farah province at about 8 a.m. when their vehicle struck a landmine, said Aqqa Mohammad Kemtoz, the provincial police chief. It was the latest in a series of bombings targeting the Afghan security forces, which  have been assuming increasing responsibility for safeguarding the country ahead of the departure of most foreign troops next year.
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