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Afghan Security Forces

August 27, 1986 | From Times Wire Services
Massive explosions tore through an army ammunition depot in Kabul, Afghanistan, early today, lighting the sky with flames that rose more than 1,000 feet high, Western diplomatic sources said. There was no immediate word on casualties, according to the sources, who spoke on condition of anonymity. State-run Kabul Radio reported that the explosions were the result of an accident, the sources said. But Western sources said Muslim rebels may have been responsible.
February 10, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali
KABUL, Afghanistan - Gen. Joseph F. Dunford Jr. took over Sunday as the newest and probably last U.S. commander in Afghanistan, tasked with ending America's longest war even as insurgents continue to challenge the U.S.-backed Afghan government. Dunford, a four-star Marine officer, arrives as the U.S.-led NATO coalition has dismantled three-quarters of its 800 bases and watches to see whether the Afghan security forces it trained can keep the Taliban insurgency at bay. A ceremony inside the coalition's heavily guarded compound in Kabul marked the end of the 19-month tenure of Gen. John R. Allen, whose command was marred by a rash of deadly “insider” attacks by Afghan forces against their U.S. and NATO trainers and strained relations with Afghan President Hamid Karzai.
February 24, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- Afghan President Hamid Karzai on Sunday ordered U.S. special forces troops to leave a strategic eastern province, accusing the Americans and Afghans working for them of torturing and abducting civilians. Karzai's office charged that in Wardak province, southwest of Kabul, a university student who was detained during a U.S. operation was later found with his head and fingers cut off. In another case, U.S. forces allegedly detained nine villagers who are still missing.
August 20, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - They've been cut down while working out in makeshift gyms, as they bedded down for the night in remote combat outposts, after shrugging off heavy packs and sweat-soaked body armor when they returned from patrol. At the height of this dusty summer, American troops are dying at unprecedented rates at the hands of their Afghan allies. And both sides are struggling to explain why, even as they search for ways to stem what are known in military parlance as "insider" attacks.
May 29, 2010 | By David Zucchino
A U.S. military investigation has harshly criticized an Air Force drone crew and U.S. ground commanders for misidentifying civilians as insurgents during a U.S. Army Special Forces operation in Oruzgan province that killed up to 23 civilians on Feb. 21. The commander of NATO forces in Afghanistan, Gen. Stanley McChrystal, responded by punishing six U.S. officers and ordering a sweeping review of counterinsurgency training. The investigation was ordered by McChrystal, who on Saturday called civilian deaths "heartbreaking."
November 17, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
  Imperial soldiers once patrolled its battlements. Treasure lay heaped in vaulted storerooms. Prisoners languished in its depths; princes plotted the course of empires. But by late in the last century, the mighty fortress overlooking this western Afghan city had fallen into ruin. Built on a plateau thought to have been a redoubt of Alexander the Great, the Citadel of Herat has been brought back to life. Reopened last month as a museum and cultural center after a painstaking refurbishment, the 15th century structure serves as a poignant reminder of past glories in a country beaten down by decades of war and deprivation.
August 17, 2012 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - The Obama administration plans to double the size of a rural police force in Afghanistan and arm it with heavier weapons to fight insurgents as U.S. troops withdraw, despite Pentagon and Afghan government concern about the village self-defense units becoming predatory criminal gangs or defecting to the Taliban. The danger was highlighted Friday when a new member of the Afghan Local Police shot and killed two U.S. special operations troops and wounded a third moments after they gave him his service weapon during a ceremony for new recruits in the western province of Farah.
December 2, 2009
President Obama's decision to send 30,000 more troops to Afghanistan pleased many military officials, who said they believe the bolstered forces will be able to execute a more robust counterinsurgency strategy. With two decisions to increase troop levels this year, Obama has nearly doubled American combat power in Afghanistan, Pentagon officials noted Tuesday. And while Army Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal did not get the 40,000 additional troops he reportedly requested, one Defense official said McChrystal would not have to scale back any of his plans to take on Taliban forces in eastern and southern Afghanistan.
March 11, 2013 | By Shashank Bengali and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A man in a police uniform opened fire on U.S. and Afghan soldiers Monday at a base in eastern Afghanistan, killing two American troops in what may be the latest in a series of insider attacks by Afghans against allied security forces. Afghan news media reported that three Afghan soldiers also were killed in the shooting in Wardak, the volatile province in eastern Afghanistan where President Hamid Karzai last month ordered U.S. special forces troops to cease operations.
August 23, 2010 | By Don Lee and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
Violence continued to flare in Afghanistan on Sunday, with four more American soldiers reported killed in three incidents. The buildup of American forces ordered last year by President Obama has brought more attacks from the Taliban against Western troops and efforts by the extremist group to exert its power in the country. Two U.S. troops were killed in insurgent attacks in the east and two others died in southern Afghanistan, the most dangerous areas of the country, where most of the new troops have been deployed.
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