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NEWS
November 1, 1985 | Associated Press
A 19-year-old Soviet soldier on guard duty near the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan, slipped into the U.S. compound today and said he wanted his superiors to send him home to the Soviet Union, the State Department told some members of Congress today. John Gersuk, an aide to Rep. Daniel A. Mica (D-Fla.), said State Department officials told the congressmen that the soldier is refusing to speak to Soviet officers. "He doesn't want to defect," Gersuk said.
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WORLD
April 6, 2013 | By Mark Magnier and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan - Joint Chiefs of Staff chairman Gen. Martin Dempsey arrived in Afghanistan on Saturday for a weekend visit aimed at assessing the amount and type of training that American troops will continue to provide Afghan defense forces after 2014, military officials said. But his arrival was marred by new violence. Three foreign soldiers and two coalition civilian workers were killed hours after he landed when a bomb-laden vehicle exploded in southeastern Zabul province, NATO officials said, without identifying the nationalities of those killed.
NATIONAL
October 13, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Washington Bureau
A U.S. military investigation into the August downing of a Chinook helicopter in Afghanistan concluded that Taliban fighters "on a heightened state of alert" shot it down, but it cleared U.S. commanders of tactical mistakes. Contrary to some initial reports, the helicopter carrying 38 U.S. and Afghan troops, including 17 Navy SEALs, was not on a rescue mission. Instead, it was dispatched to kill or capture a Taliban leader. As the CH-47 helicopter descended toward a landing zone in Wardak province, it was struck by a rocket-propelled grenade, which sheared off a rear rotor blade and caused the craft to plummet 150 feet into a dry creek bed, where it exploded, Brig.
WORLD
January 8, 2013 | By Alexandra Zavis and Hashmat Baktash
KABUL, Afghanistan -- A British soldier was shot and killed when a man believed to be a member of the Afghan National Army turned his weapon on foreign troops and his Afghan colleagues in a restive southern province, officials said Tuesday. Monday's attack appeared to be the latest in a rash of insider killings that has eroded trust between Afghan troops and their foreign mentors as the country prepares for the withdrawal of most international forces by the end of 2014. It came as Afghan President Hamid Karzai and other top Afghan officials were en route to Washington for a meeting Friday with President Obama to discuss future military, political and economic cooperation.
WORLD
July 19, 2011 | Laura King
A new U.S. commander, Marine Gen. John R. Allen, formally took control of the war in Afghanistan on Monday, inheriting a nearly decade-long conflict that has cost the lives of at least 1,668 American troops. Allen succeeds Army Gen. David H. Petraeus, who is leaving to head the CIA. Petraeus had been in command for only a year, hastily taking the helm after President Obama forced out Gen. Stanley A. McChrystal after a Rolling Stone article on him reported intemperate comments by his staff about the administration's civilian leadership.
WORLD
June 5, 2013 | By Ken Dilanian
BRUSSELS - Germany and Italy have committed to join the United States in helping to train Afghan troops after combat operations cease at the end of next year, U.S. Defense Secretary Chuck Hagel said Wednesday. Absent from the announcement was reference to the closest U.S. ally, Britain, which has been the second-largest source of troops in the 11-year Afghanistan war. Britain is expected to contribute to the training and mentoring, but has not yet pledged a specific role in what promises to be a dramatically reduced international mission 18 months from now. Germany will take the lead in the north of Afghanistan and Italy in the west, diplomats said after a meeting of North Atlantic Treaty Organization defense ministers in Brussels, while Hagel said Turkey is considering becoming the lead nation in the capital, Kabul.
NEWS
May 25, 1988 | From Times Wire Services
The Kremlin probably won't meet the goal of pulling one-fourth of its soldiers out of Afghanistan this month because U.S.-backed guerrillas are overwhelming Afghan troops left behind, Western diplomats said Tuesday. Meanwhile, Kabul Radio reported that guerrillas Tuesday staged rocket attacks on Kabul, the Afghan capital, for the second straight day, killing at least two people.
WORLD
August 13, 2009 | Associated Press
U.S. Marines battled Taliban fighters for control of a strategic southern town in a new operation to cut militant supply lines and allow Afghan residents to vote in next week's presidential election. Insurgents appeared to dig in for a fight, firing volleys of rocket-propelled grenades, mortar rounds and missiles from the back of a truck at the Marines, who were surprised at the intense resistance. By sunset, Marines had made little progress into Dahaneh beyond the gains of the initial predawn assault Wednesday.
WORLD
September 2, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - American special operations forces have suspended the training of new recruits to an Afghan village militia until the entire 16,000-member force can be rescreened for possible links to the insurgency, U.S. officials said Sunday. The move is the latest repercussion from a series of "insider" shootings carried out by members of the Afghan police and army against Western troops. Forty-five NATO service members have been killed in such attacks this year, and the U.S. toll in August alone was 12 dead.
WORLD
August 30, 2012 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
KABUL, Afghanistan - Not long ago, Bamiyan province was considered one of the most peaceful corners of Afghanistan, a remote and scenic enclave that was largely free of the daily violence that roils so much of the country. Now it may become a cautionary tale about the pitfalls of winding down the war here. In the summer of 2011, Bamiyan's tranquil image was such that it was picked as the country's first province for the transfer of fighting duties from Western forces to Afghan troops, a process that is to be replicated across Afghanistan in a prelude to the end of NATO's combat role in 2014.
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