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NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Afghanistan's President Najibullah issued a new appeal to the United Nations to help bring peace to his country as rebel sources reported heavy fighting on Sunday near the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad. Najibullah's message to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar again accused Pakistan of sending commandos and military helicopters to aid the moujahedeen rebels. Pakistan has denied the charges.
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NEWS
September 21, 1991 | CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Arguing that the war in Afghanistan will not be over until all Soviet soldiers have returned home, deputies in the Russian Parliament called Friday for negotiations with Afghan rebels based in Pakistan to free prisoners of war. Concern for the 308 Soviet soldiers still listed as missing in action from the Afghan war has grown in recent days because of the Kremlin's decision to halt weapons shipments to the embattled Marxist government that the Soviets helped to install.
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NEWS
March 5, 1989 | From Reuters
A convoy of several hundred trucks carrying food and fuel from the Soviet Union reached the Afghan capital virtually unscathed Saturday following a deal reportedly struck between rebels and President Najibullah. Afghan officials said up to 600 trucks arrived in Kabul from the Soviet border town of Termez, and 300 more are expected today.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet-backed Afghan government said Saturday it is ready to stop the war against Western-supported guerrillas and endorsed Friday's U.S.-Soviet agreement to halt all weapons supplies to the warring sides by Jan. 1. But radical Muslim guerrillas said they will continue fighting to topple President Najibullah's government in Kabul. Afghan Premier Fazlul Haq Khaleqyar has "expressed full readiness to ensure peace and cessation of the war as well as implementation of the Soviet-U.S.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mukhtar, a 12-year-old orphan of Afghanistan's raging civil war, was studying his Russian lessons on the floor of a dingy dormitory room at Kabul's Orphanage of the Homeland on Wednesday when a visitor dropped in. The stranger wanted to chat about Karl Marx, V. I. Lenin and the recent events that have radically transformed the superpower that has looked after Mukhtar since he lost his mother, father, uncle and brothers to war. "Why are you studying Russian?" the visitor asked.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
The announcement that the Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan may signal the winding up of the bloodiest conflict of the 1980s. The History An April, 1978, revolution brought the Communists to power, and by late the next year the Soviet Union had begin a massive airlift of men and armor to save the tottering Kabul regime.
NEWS
October 13, 1988 | DON SHANNON, Times Staff Writer
A Soviet pledge of $600 million in aid topped the list of offers Wednesday as the United Nations sought a total of $1.1 billion for relief and reconstruction of war-ravaged Afghanistan. It was an unprecedented move by Moscow, which has never before joined in an international project of this kind, limiting its aid in the past to bilateral agreements largely with Marxist nations.
NEWS
September 15, 1991 | Reuters
The Soviet-backed Afghan government said Saturday it is ready to stop the war against Western-supported guerrillas and endorsed Friday's U.S.-Soviet agreement to halt all weapons supplies to the warring sides by Jan. 1. But radical Muslim guerrillas said they will continue fighting to topple President Najibullah's government in Kabul. Afghan Premier Fazlul Haq Khaleqyar has "expressed full readiness to ensure peace and cessation of the war as well as implementation of the Soviet-U.S.
NEWS
August 21, 1989
An Afghan general who was in charge of President Najibullah's personal security force has defected to the rebel side, and he said that the country's Marxist regime is weak and could soon fall. "If the Russians cut off all supplies to (Najibullah), he'd be finished in two or three months," Maj. Gen. Mohammed Farouk Zarif told a news conference in Peshawar, Pakistan.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Najibullah, one of the world's last Soviet-backed totalitarian leaders, says he has no intention of stepping down, despite the fall of the hard-liners in the Kremlin and the KGB who put him in power and the imminent prospect of an end to his arms supplies from Moscow.
NEWS
September 14, 1991
The announcement that the Soviet Union and the United States have agreed to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan may signal the winding up of the bloodiest conflict of the 1980s. The History An April, 1978, revolution brought the Communists to power, and by late the next year the Soviet Union had begin a massive airlift of men and armor to save the tottering Kabul regime.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
President Najibullah, one of the world's last Soviet-backed totalitarian leaders, says he has no intention of stepping down, despite the fall of the hard-liners in the Kremlin and the KGB who put him in power and the imminent prospect of an end to his arms supplies from Moscow.
NEWS
September 14, 1991 | DOYLE McMANUS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Soviet Union and the United States agreed Friday to halt all military aid to the warring factions in Afghanistan as of Jan. 1, opening the way for a negotiated end to a 13-year civil war that has killed hundreds of thousands of people.
NEWS
September 13, 1991 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Mukhtar, a 12-year-old orphan of Afghanistan's raging civil war, was studying his Russian lessons on the floor of a dingy dormitory room at Kabul's Orphanage of the Homeland on Wednesday when a visitor dropped in. The stranger wanted to chat about Karl Marx, V. I. Lenin and the recent events that have radically transformed the superpower that has looked after Mukhtar since he lost his mother, father, uncle and brothers to war. "Why are you studying Russian?" the visitor asked.
NEWS
September 5, 1991 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After 12 years of surrogate warfare with the Soviet Union in Afghanistan, the United States intends to press for new cooperation from Moscow to end the bloodshed that has killed hundreds of thousands of people and sapped billions of dollars from both countries for weapons. The determination to resolve one of the world's bloodiest civil wars has been fueled by the dramatic political upheaval in the Soviet Union after the failed coup.
NEWS
August 21, 1989
An Afghan general who was in charge of President Najibullah's personal security force has defected to the rebel side, and he said that the country's Marxist regime is weak and could soon fall. "If the Russians cut off all supplies to (Najibullah), he'd be finished in two or three months," Maj. Gen. Mohammed Farouk Zarif told a news conference in Peshawar, Pakistan.
NEWS
January 24, 1989
The Soviet military stepped up emergency airlifts to the capital of Afghanistan to ease severe food shortages it blamed on hoarding and inefficiency by local authorities. Soviet officials said 400 to 500 tons of flour were arriving daily on a dozen flights from the Soviet cities of Tashkent and Fergana, both about an hour from the capital of Kabul by plane.
NEWS
January 10, 1988 | From Reuters
The Soviet Union agreed Saturday to increase agricultural aid to Afghanistan by sending it more tractors, harvesters, fertilizer and seed, the official Tass news agency reported. Afghan Agriculture and Land Reform Minister Ghulam Farook Kobakiwal, who is visiting Moscow, signed a cooperation protocol with the Soviet state agro-industrial committee.
NEWS
March 13, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Afghanistan's President Najibullah issued a new appeal to the United Nations to help bring peace to his country as rebel sources reported heavy fighting on Sunday near the eastern Afghan city of Jalalabad. Najibullah's message to U.N. Secretary General Javier Perez de Cuellar again accused Pakistan of sending commandos and military helicopters to aid the moujahedeen rebels. Pakistan has denied the charges.
NEWS
March 5, 1989 | From Reuters
A convoy of several hundred trucks carrying food and fuel from the Soviet Union reached the Afghan capital virtually unscathed Saturday following a deal reportedly struck between rebels and President Najibullah. Afghan officials said up to 600 trucks arrived in Kabul from the Soviet border town of Termez, and 300 more are expected today.
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