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Afghanistan Foreign Relations United States

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November 10, 1988
The leader of the Afghan resistance, maintaining that the Soviets "do not want peace," rejected the Reagan Administration's counsel of restraint and vowed to keep fighting as long as Soviet forces remain in Afghanistan. "The Russians have not ended the war in Afghanistan," Burhanuddin Rabbani, chairman of the rebel alliance, said in an interview in Washington. Rabbani conferred with President Reagan and later met with Secretary of State George P. Shultz.
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NEWS
May 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flanked by dozens of submachine gunners in business suits in a decaying movie theater surrounded by tanks and soldiers, Afghan President Najibullah took the stage this week to convince the world that his harsh, Soviet-backed regime has seen the light of democracy.
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NEWS
May 31, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Flanked by dozens of submachine gunners in business suits in a decaying movie theater surrounded by tanks and soldiers, Afghan President Najibullah took the stage this week to convince the world that his harsh, Soviet-backed regime has seen the light of democracy.
NEWS
November 10, 1988
The leader of the Afghan resistance, maintaining that the Soviets "do not want peace," rejected the Reagan Administration's counsel of restraint and vowed to keep fighting as long as Soviet forces remain in Afghanistan. "The Russians have not ended the war in Afghanistan," Burhanuddin Rabbani, chairman of the rebel alliance, said in an interview in Washington. Rabbani conferred with President Reagan and later met with Secretary of State George P. Shultz.
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