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Afghanistan Government

NEWS
October 5, 2001 | ROBYN DIXON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When the Virtue and Vice police caught sight of 14-year-old Farkhanda, with her naive eyes and childish face, they gave chase with their sticks and beat her. As she walked home from a family wedding in the capital, Kabul, three weeks ago, Farkhanda crossed the line dividing carefree girlhood from fearful womanhood, simply by showing her face.
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NEWS
September 23, 2001 | ROBIN WRIGHT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
As moves by Afghanistan's neighbors thrust it toward total diplomatic isolation, President Bush appeared to gain additional support from Russia on Saturday in building ties with anti-Taliban resistance forces. The United Arab Emirates broke off diplomatic relations with Afghanistan, and a top Bush administration official said Saudi Arabia is soon expected to follow suit.
NEWS
August 2, 1990 | JIM MANN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III and Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze concluded two days of talks in the Siberian city of Irkutsk today by agreeing on the importance of Soviet and American cooperation in Asia. "In Asia, too, the Soviet Union and the United States do not regard each other as adversaries," Shevardnadze told reporters during a news conference after the talks. The U.S.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
November 18, 2001 | ERIC BAILEY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
After all the years away, it would be so easy to stay put, comfortable in America's hulking embrace. But not for the three Farzana sisters. They won't hear of it. Smuggled out of Afghanistan by their parents in 1980 amid the rumble of occupying Soviet tanks, they landed in the United States to start over. Despite adjustments and heartaches, the sisters forged good lives. They have jobs, children, cozy homes in this Bay Area city's deeply rooted Afghan expatriate community.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by guards posing for the television cameras, a gray-bearded Afghan rebel leader proclaimed here Wednesday that the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan was "one of the most unprecedented events of the last few centuries" and that it "defeated communism's philosophy all over the world as a whole."
NEWS
April 20, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of the Muslim rebel faction that helped drive Afghan President Najibullah from power last week pledged not to take the capital by force, as the besieged new regime said Sunday for the first time that it was considering the rebels' demand that Kabul be ceded to a government drawn from the guerrillas.
NEWS
September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel commanders rejected an offer from Afghan President Najibullah to directly negotiate an end to their country's civil war, vowing to fight on to topple his Communist-style government. They also accused fundamentalist rebel chief Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of secretly plotting to form a coalition government with Najibullah and Gen. Shahnawaz Tanai, a former defense minister who defected in 1990.
NEWS
November 26, 2001 | RONE TEMPEST, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The director of surgery at the public hospital was a Muslim cleric with no medical experience. The state bank director had memorized every verse of the Holy Koran but knew nothing of finance. In all the Taliban provincial offices here, only the mullah who headed the provincial office of the Ministry for the Promotion of Virtue and Prevention of Vice appeared qualified for his job.
NEWS
December 31, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indian negotiators have offered to release jailed Kashmiri militants to gain the freedom of more than 150 hostages on a hijacked jet in Afghanistan, but talks are deadlocked concerning the issue of sanctuaries for the hijackers and the militants, Afghan officials and other sources said Thursday.
NEWS
December 22, 2001 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haji Abdul Qadir climbed into his white Toyota Land Cruiser with darkly tinted windows Friday and set off on the six-hour drive to Kabul, taking with him an armful of documents and enough soldiers to take on a small army. Qadir, the governor of Nangarhar province, is expected to play a prominent role in Hamid Karzai's interim government that will be sworn in today in the capital, officially ending the brutal five-year rule of the Taliban. He does not underestimate the challenges ahead.
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