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February 16, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by guards posing for the television cameras, a gray-bearded Afghan rebel leader proclaimed here Wednesday that the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan was "one of the most unprecedented events of the last few centuries" and that it "defeated communism's philosophy all over the world as a whole."
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April 20, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The leader of the Muslim rebel faction that helped drive Afghan President Najibullah from power last week pledged not to take the capital by force, as the besieged new regime said Sunday for the first time that it was considering the rebels' demand that Kabul be ceded to a government drawn from the guerrillas.
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September 17, 1991 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Rebel commanders rejected an offer from Afghan President Najibullah to directly negotiate an end to their country's civil war, vowing to fight on to topple his Communist-style government. They also accused fundamentalist rebel chief Gulbuddin Hekmatyar of secretly plotting to form a coalition government with Najibullah and Gen. Shahnawaz Tanai, a former defense minister who defected in 1990.
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December 31, 1999 | DEXTER FILKINS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Indian negotiators have offered to release jailed Kashmiri militants to gain the freedom of more than 150 hostages on a hijacked jet in Afghanistan, but talks are deadlocked concerning the issue of sanctuaries for the hijackers and the militants, Afghan officials and other sources said Thursday.
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December 22, 2001 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Haji Abdul Qadir climbed into his white Toyota Land Cruiser with darkly tinted windows Friday and set off on the six-hour drive to Kabul, taking with him an armful of documents and enough soldiers to take on a small army. Qadir, the governor of Nangarhar province, is expected to play a prominent role in Hamid Karzai's interim government that will be sworn in today in the capital, officially ending the brutal five-year rule of the Taliban. He does not underestimate the challenges ahead.
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November 2, 2001 | RICHARD BOUDREAUX and TYLER MARSHALL, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
A month ago, Afghanistan's main opposition force and exiled king agreed to join in shaping a pro-Western leadership for their country. By the end of October, a Supreme Council for National Unity was to be ready to supplant the Taliban, whose days of harsh, theocratic rule seemed to be numbered. But that accord among Afghans has done little more than fire up the rival ambitions of outsiders.
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November 17, 2001 | SORAYA SARHADDI NELSON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any new government in Afghanistan should not be divided equally between tribes or religious sects, nor should foreign governments play a role in setting it up, the Northern Alliance general who controls the western city of Herat said Friday. "The criteria to establishing a government is not tribal or religious, just wise and reasonable people," Gen.
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November 3, 2001 | From Reuters
Foreign ministers from six of Afghanistan's neighbors, the United States and Russia intend to meet Nov. 12 with the U.N. envoy who has been trying to set up a post-Taliban government in the central Asian nation, U.S. officials said Friday. Lakhdar Brahimi, the special U.N. representative for Afghanistan, has been holding intensive talks with Afghans and members of the Pakistani government in Islamabad and will visit Iran before returning to New York on Nov. 10.
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April 5, 2002 | From Associated Press
The fragile new Afghan government took on a daunting political and logistical challenge Thursday, vowing to eliminate the Afghan poppy crop, source of perhaps 70% of the world's opium and of much of this impoverished country's income. Just two weeks from the harvest of the plants, which are used in the production of heroin, the government said it would offer farmers about $500 an acre to destroy crops--a fraction of what they can earn by selling the opium the plants yield.
NEWS
October 7, 1998 | From Times Wire Reports
The Taliban offered to stop growing poppies--which help make Afghanistan the world's second-largest opium producer after the Golden Triangle of Southeast Asia--in exchange for recognition by the United Nations as the government of the country. Mullah Mohammed Omar, the supreme leader of the Islamic militia, made the offer in remarks that were broadcast by the Taliban over the radio. Only Pakistan, Saudi Arabia and the United Arab Emirates recognize the Taliban as the government of Afghanistan.
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