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Afghanistan Military Aid Ussr

NEWS
December 12, 1990 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Secretary of State James A. Baker III gave tentative and qualified support Tuesday to a proposal by Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze for a nuclear-free zone in the Middle East if Iraq agrees to end its occupation of Kuwait.
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NEWS
November 9, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
In a strident address before Parliament, President Ghulam Ishaq Khan vowed to end his country's hat-in-hand relationship with the United States. Ishaq Khan also warned that the 12-year-old war in neighboring Afghanistan will not end until the Soviet Union halts its support for that country's Communist government. As expected, Pakistan's new Prime Minister Nawaz Sharif easily won a vote of confidence in Parliament.
NEWS
April 30, 1990 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Afghanistan's Islamic resistance, hailed as a brave anti-Communist crusade in the 10 years that brought billions of dollars in U.S. military aid, has all but given up its holy war against the Soviet-backed regime in Kabul. Fourteen months after the last Soviet soldier withdrew from Afghanistan, the rebels, known as the moujahedeen , are hopelessly divided.
NEWS
March 15, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
The Soviet Union offered Afghanistan military support during a coup attempt in Kabul last week, but the Communist government turned down the aid, President Najibullah said. He also said that two days before the failed takeover, he suspected that the defense minister, Shahnawaz Tanai, was plotting a coup and offered him the presidency. "It is yours if you think you can rule," Najibullah said. Tanai fled to Pakistan after the coup failed but is now believed to be back in Afghanistan.
NEWS
December 25, 1989 | MASHA HAMILTON, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Soviet lawmakers, in a remarkable admission of past Kremlin wrongdoing, stood for a moment's silence Sunday in memory of the thousands of soldiers killed in Afghanistan and then voted to denounce the country's 1979 invasion of its neighbor and the leaders who decided to launch the war.
NEWS
November 30, 1989 | ROBERT C. TOTH, TIMES STAFF WRITER
On the eve of President Bush's departure for the Malta summit, Secretary of State James A. Baker III declared two key priorities in relations with the Soviet Union: continued reform in Eastern Europe and a cut in Soviet-made arms flowing to Central America and conflicts in other Third World areas. Although promoted at first as an "unstructured, agenda-less meeting," Baker said that at the two-day summit this weekend, Bush and Soviet President Mikhail S.
NEWS
October 14, 1989
Afghanistan said it still has Soviet military advisers but that they are only in Kabul province and are not involved in fighting Western-backed rebels. A Foreign Ministry statement broadcast by official Kabul Radio denied U.S. charges that Soviet military personnel still seemed to be aiding government forces. It said the advisers are there "for technical acquaintance with weapons, but they do not take part in operating the weapons." Soviet troops pulled out of Afghanistan last February.
NEWS
October 11, 1989 | From Associated Press
A rocket hit a crowded bus station in the Afghan capital of Kabul on Tuesday, killing 23 people and injuring an undetermined number, Radio Kabul reported. The official radio, monitored in Islamabad, described a grisly scene of blood, fragmented bodies and people crying. It said five surface-to-surface rockets in all hit Kabul on Tuesday, the eve of the Afghan celebration of the birth of the Muslim prophet Mohammed.
NEWS
October 10, 1989
Washington says Soviet military advisers are still in Afghanistan firing Scud missiles at rebel forces despite Moscow's assertions that all Soviet troops have been withdrawn, the New York Times reported. It quoted a confidential government report on military and political activities in Afghanistan as stating that "all functions connected with the security, transportation, storage and launch of Scud missiles are handled by Soviet advisers" wearing Afghan uniforms.
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