Advertisement
YOU ARE HERE: LAT HomeCollectionsAfghanistan Pakistan
IN THE NEWS

Afghanistan Pakistan

FEATURED ARTICLES
WORLD
October 13, 2002 | David Zucchino, Times Staff Writer
The search of Amar Gul's hut was yielding little until Pfc. Andrew Johnson happened to notice a poster on the mud-brick wall. There, smiling benevolently, was the face of Osama bin Laden. "Hey, sergeant, you gotta see this!" Johnson shouted to his squad leader, Sgt. 1st Class Wylie Hutchison. Hutchison confronted Gul, a tall ethnic Pushtun with a wild black beard. Gul claimed that the poster belonged to his uncle.
ARTICLES BY DATE
OPINION
May 29, 2012 | By Dilip Hiro
If the 11-year war against jihadist terrorism is to succeed, then its leaders must change their approach. So far, the U.S. and its NATO allies have approached jihadist violence in Afghanistan and Pakistan as a single problem, to be met with a single strategy. But success will require a more nuanced parsing of who is conducting jihad and why, because the jihadists are not a homogenous group. An Arabic word, "jihad" has a broad range of meaning. It can refer to an individual Muslim's internal struggle to adhere more faithfully to the teachings of Islam or, at the other extreme, to a holy war waged against external forces threatening Islam.
Advertisement
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian
The Obama administration has concluded in a newly released counter-terrorism strategy that precision strikes and raids, rather than large land wars, are the most effective way to defeat Al Qaeda. “Al Qaeda seeks to bleed us financially by drawing us into long, costly wars that also inflame anti-American sentiment,” John Brennan, President Obama’s counter-terrorism advisor, said in a speech Wednesday unveiling the new strategy. “Going forward, we will be mindful that if our nation is threatened, our best offense won’t always be deploying large armies abroad but delivering targeted, surgical pressure to the groups that threaten us.” Brennan, a longtime former CIA officer, spoke at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, as the White House posted the new strategy on its website.
WORLD
December 22, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
  A Pentagon investigation of an airstrike last month that killed 24 Pakistani troops found that the U.S. failed to verify the location of Pakistani units before ordering the attack, but also blamed Pakistani soldiers for starting the fighting. The findings released Thursday are the first public acknowledgment by the United States that its mistakes contributed to the deaths, a position aggressively asserted by Pakistan. By also faulting Pakistan the Pentagon report is likely to prolong the tense standoff between the two nations.
WORLD
December 22, 2011 | By David S. Cloud and Laura King, Los Angeles Times
  A Pentagon investigation of an airstrike last month that killed 24 Pakistani troops found that the U.S. failed to verify the location of Pakistani units before ordering the attack, but also blamed Pakistani soldiers for starting the fighting. The findings released Thursday are the first public acknowledgment by the United States that its mistakes contributed to the deaths, a position aggressively asserted by Pakistan. By also faulting Pakistan the Pentagon report is likely to prolong the tense standoff between the two nations.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
Precision strikes and raids, rather than large land wars, are the most effective way to defeat Al Qaeda, the Obama administration has concluded in a newly released counter-terrorism strategy. "Al Qaeda seeks to bleed us financially by drawing us into long, costly wars that also inflame anti-American sentiment," John Brennan, President Obama's counter-terrorism advisor, said in a speech Wednesday detailing the new strategy. "Going forward, we will be mindful that if our nation is threatened, our best offense won't always be deploying large armies abroad but delivering targeted, surgical pressure to the groups that threaten us. " Brennan, a longtime former CIA officer, spoke at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, as the White House posted the new strategy on its website.
NATIONAL
December 14, 2009 | By Sebastian Rotella
Discussing in strikingly personal terms his order to escalate the war in Afghanistan, President Obama said Sunday that sending 30,000 new combat troops was the hardest decision of his presidency so far. Obama called his Dec. 1 speech at West Point announcing the deployment the "most emotional speech I've made." "I was looking out over a group of cadets, some of whom were going to be deployed in Afghanistan," Obama said in a "60 Minutes" interview taped Dec. 7 and broadcast Sunday night, for which CBS provided a transcript.
WORLD
August 11, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Nasir Khan, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A coordinated attack involving a remote-control bomb blast and a female suicide bomber killed seven people in Peshawar on Thursday, ending a stretch of relative calm in the volatile northwest city. The blasts occurred at a police checkpoint in the city of 1.4 million people perched on the edge of Pakistan's tribal belt along the Afghan border, where Taliban militants and their allies maintain strongholds. Plagued by scores of suicide bomb attacks in recent years, Peshawar has seen a lull in militant violence in the last few weeks.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma said Sunday that Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had accepted a "road map" for ending the conflict that pits his forces against rebels determined to end his four-decade rule. Zuma, who according to news reports led a delegation of African Union leaders in a meeting with Kadafi at his compound in Tripoli, did not disclose details of the cease-fire proposal. He also didn't specify whether Kadafi himself or his adjutants had accepted the African Union plan.
WORLD
May 16, 2011 | From CNN
There are "disturbing" signs Pakistan's government knows about insurgents crossing from their country into Afghanistan, U.S. Sen. John Kerry said Sunday as he toured the region. "Yes, there are insurgents coming across the border," he said at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. "Yes, they are operating out of north Waziristan [Pakistan] and other areas of the sanctuaries, and yes, there is some evidence of Pakistan government knowledge of some of these activities in ways that is very disturbing.
WORLD
August 11, 2011 | By Alex Rodriguez and Nasir Khan, Los Angeles Times, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
A coordinated attack involving a remote-control bomb blast and a female suicide bomber killed seven people in Peshawar on Thursday, ending a stretch of relative calm in the volatile northwest city. The blasts occurred at a police checkpoint in the city of 1.4 million people perched on the edge of Pakistan's tribal belt along the Afghan border, where Taliban militants and their allies maintain strongholds. Plagued by scores of suicide bomb attacks in recent years, Peshawar has seen a lull in militant violence in the last few weeks.
NATIONAL
June 30, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian, Washington Bureau
Precision strikes and raids, rather than large land wars, are the most effective way to defeat Al Qaeda, the Obama administration has concluded in a newly released counter-terrorism strategy. "Al Qaeda seeks to bleed us financially by drawing us into long, costly wars that also inflame anti-American sentiment," John Brennan, President Obama's counter-terrorism advisor, said in a speech Wednesday detailing the new strategy. "Going forward, we will be mindful that if our nation is threatened, our best offense won't always be deploying large armies abroad but delivering targeted, surgical pressure to the groups that threaten us. " Brennan, a longtime former CIA officer, spoke at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, as the White House posted the new strategy on its website.
NEWS
June 29, 2011 | By Ken Dilanian
The Obama administration has concluded in a newly released counter-terrorism strategy that precision strikes and raids, rather than large land wars, are the most effective way to defeat Al Qaeda. “Al Qaeda seeks to bleed us financially by drawing us into long, costly wars that also inflame anti-American sentiment,” John Brennan, President Obama’s counter-terrorism advisor, said in a speech Wednesday unveiling the new strategy. “Going forward, we will be mindful that if our nation is threatened, our best offense won’t always be deploying large armies abroad but delivering targeted, surgical pressure to the groups that threaten us.” Brennan, a longtime former CIA officer, spoke at the Paul H. Nitze School of Advanced International Studies at Johns Hopkins University in Washington, as the White House posted the new strategy on its website.
WORLD
June 26, 2011 | By Ramin Mostaghim and Alexandra Sandels, Los Angeles Times
A battered Peugeot sedan greeted visitors Saturday to a conference hall in north Tehran. "Professor Massoud Ali Mohammadi, martyred in front of his house," explained an accompanying poster. It was a reference to the mysterious assassination last year of the Iranian physicist, killed when a bomb exploded near his car in Tehran. Iranian authorities have blamed the West for the killing. The Peugeot was the symbolic scene-setter for a two-day conference in the Iranian capital on fighting terrorism.
NEWS
June 6, 2011 | By Christi Parsons, Washington Bureau
President Obama and his senior national security advisors convened Monday to discuss Afghanistan and Pakistan, as the administration wrestles with questions about strategy in the region and what role American troops should play there. The president's full national security team went into the White House Situation Room to discuss what progress the allies have made in fighting insurgents after a recent Pentagon report attributed successes on the battlefield to the 30,000 additional troops Obama sent to the war. But the optimism is countered by reports from U.S. officials in the region who predict a renewed commitment to attacks by the Taliban and other insurgency groups, and by recent complaints from Afghan President Hamid Karzai about civilian deaths in airstrikes.
WORLD
May 16, 2011 | From CNN
There are "disturbing" signs Pakistan's government knows about insurgents crossing from their country into Afghanistan, U.S. Sen. John Kerry said Sunday as he toured the region. "Yes, there are insurgents coming across the border," he said at the U.S. Embassy in Kabul, Afghanistan. "Yes, they are operating out of north Waziristan [Pakistan] and other areas of the sanctuaries, and yes, there is some evidence of Pakistan government knowledge of some of these activities in ways that is very disturbing.
WORLD
March 12, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times
U.S. Defense Secretary Robert M. Gates on Friday warned allies against "ill-timed, precipitous or uncoordinated" drawdowns of their troops from Afghanistan that could harm gains made against Taliban militants. Gates aimed to discourage allies in Europe from using the Obama administration's plans to withdraw some troops beginning in July as a pretext to bring out large numbers of their own forces. The planned withdrawals are expected to be a small percentage of the overall U.S. force, but if allies with only a few thousand soldiers or fewer bring out similar numbers it could cause problems, officials said.
OPINION
December 15, 2001
Afghanistan could become a canvas for the more benevolent intentions of prosperous, civilized nations. If the right amounts of resources and attention are devoted to its prosperity, Afghanistan (its condition arguably sustained by the long Cold War between two powerful, belligerent nations) could receive the benefit of the competence that those democratic, free-market societies often presuppose. The work could be done transparently, delicately, in full view of those communities and nations that have been questioning democratic, free-market competence.
WORLD
May 13, 2011 | By Laura King, Los Angeles Times
With a high-profile political visit and a promise of more aid, India moved Thursday to cement its ties with the government of Afghan President Hamid Karzai — overtures that are all but certain to raise hackles in Pakistan, which has long sought to limit Indian influence here. At a time when the regional balance of power has been roiled by the killing of Osama bin Laden in his Pakistani hideaway by U.S. forces, India's visiting Prime Minister Manmohan Singh also lent support to the Karzai government's efforts to strike a peace deal with the Taliban, the Islamist movement that Pakistan helped create and nurture.
WORLD
April 11, 2011 | By Ned Parker and Borzou Daragahi, Los Angeles Times
South African President Jacob Zuma said Sunday that Libyan leader Moammar Kadafi had accepted a "road map" for ending the conflict that pits his forces against rebels determined to end his four-decade rule. Zuma, who according to news reports led a delegation of African Union leaders in a meeting with Kadafi at his compound in Tripoli, did not disclose details of the cease-fire proposal. He also didn't specify whether Kadafi himself or his adjutants had accepted the African Union plan.
Los Angeles Times Articles
|