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Afghanistan Pakistan

April 8, 2009 | Paul Richter
Vice President Joe Biden issued a high-level admonishment to Israel's new government Tuesday that it would be "ill advised" to launch a military strike against Iran. Biden said in a CNN interview that he does not believe newly installed Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu would take such a step. Even so, his comment underscored a gap between the conservative new Israeli government and the Obama White House on a series of questions, including the Israeli-Palestinian peace process and Iran.
July 9, 2011 | By David S. Cloud, Los Angeles Times Staff Writer
Defense Secretary Leon Panetta declared Saturday that the United States is "within reach" of "strategically defeating" Al Qaeda as a terrorist threat, but that doing so would require killing or capturing the group's 10 to 20 remaining leaders. Arriving in Afghanistan for the first time since taking office earlier this month, Panetta said that intelligence uncovered in the raid that killed Osama bin Laden in May showed that 10 years of U.S. operations against Al Qaeda had left it with fewer than two dozen key operatives, most of whom are in Pakistan, Yemen, Somalia, and North Africa.
December 17, 1986 | From Reuters
A moderate earthquake shook parts of Afghanistan and Pakistan today, registering 5.3 on the Richter scale at its epicenter north of Kabul.
January 8, 2009 | Laura King
Breaking weeks of silence on a highly sensitive subject, Pakistani authorities acknowledged for the first time Wednesday that the lone surviving suspect in the Mumbai attacks is a Pakistani national. Authorities here have been extremely reluctant to formally acknowledge Pakistani links to the shooting rampage in India's commercial and entertainment hub, even though Indian officials had almost immediately identified the captured man, Ajmal Amir Kasab, as a Pakistani.
May 20, 2007 | Greg Miller, Times Staff Writer
A major CIA effort launched last year to hunt down Osama bin Laden has produced no significant leads on his whereabouts, but has helped track an alarming increase in the movement of Al Qaeda operatives and money into Pakistan's tribal territories, according to senior U.S. intelligence officials familiar with the operation. In one of the most troubling trends, U.S.
February 15, 2013 | By Brian Bennett and Joel Rubin, Los Angeles Times
WASHINGTON - While a national debate has erupted over the Obama administration's lethal drone strikes overseas, federal authorities have stepped up efforts to license surveillance drones for law enforcement and other uses in U.S. airspace, spurring growing concern about violations of privacy. The Federal Aviation Administration said Friday it had issued 1,428 permits to domestic drone operators since 2007, far more than were previously known. Some 327 permits are still listed as active.
November 30, 2009
Stones Into Schools Promoting Peace With Books, Not Bombs, in Afghanistan and Pakistan Greg Mortenson Viking: 420 pp., $26.95
May 3, 2009 | DOYLE McMANUS
David Kilcullen is no soft-headed peacenik. He's a beefy, 41-year-old former Australian army officer who served in Iraq as a top advisor to U.S. Army Gen. David H. Petraeus. He's one of the counter-insurgency warrior/theorists who designed Petraeus' successful "surge" of troops into the streets of Baghdad. But a few days ago, when a congressman asked Kilcullen what the U.S. government should do in Pakistan, the Australian guerrilla fighter sounded like an antiwar protester.
March 28, 2010 | By Tom Hayden
Without public debate and without congressional hearings, a segment of the Pentagon and fellow travelers have embraced a doctrine known as the Long War, which projects an "arc of instability" caused by insurgent groups from Europe to South Asia that will last between 50 and 80 years. According to one of its architects, Iraq, Afghanistan and Pakistan are just "small wars in the midst of a big one." Consider the audacity of such an idea. An 80-year undeclared war would entangle 20 future presidential terms stretching far into the future of voters not yet born.
December 24, 2001 | From Times Wire Reports
Abdul Salam Zaeef, the Taliban ambassador to Pakistan, said he has applied for asylum out of fear of persecution in Afghanistan. Pakistan has not yet responded to the application, submitted two weeks ago, Zaeef told Associated Press. "I'll go back to Afghanistan when the situation improves, but it is dangerous for me to go there now," he said. No immediate comment was available from Pakistan, which has said it provided a reasonable time for Zaeef and his staff to pack up and leave.
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