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Afghanistan Revolts

NEWS
June 12, 1987 | From Times Wire Services
Afghan rebels, firing a U.S.-made Stinger missile, shot down a civilian airplane in southern Afghanistan on Thursday, killing at least 53 people including 16 children, Kabul radio said. The broadcast said a Soviet-made AN-26 plane of Bakhtar Alwatana, Afghanistan's domestic carrier, was hit by a missile over Zabul province, about 180 miles southwest of Kabul, on a domestic flight to the capital, crashing near Shah Juy.
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NEWS
September 28, 1988 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, Times Staff Writer
Soviet Foreign Minister Eduard A. Shevardnadze called Tuesday for a special U.N. Security Council meeting to ensure compliance with the Afghan peace accords and hinted that the Soviet Union might suspend its troop withdrawal if the United States and Pakistan do not end military aid to rebels fighting to oust the Moscow-backed government. In a speech to the U.N.
NEWS
August 18, 1988 | Times Wire Services
Muslim rebels destroyed a major Soviet arms depot in northern Afghanistan in a rocket attack that left as many as 109 dead, a Western diplomat based in Kabul said Wednesday. The diplomat quoted "multiple Afghan sources" as saying 109 Soviet troops died in the Aug. 10 blast caused by two rockets hitting the facility at Kalagay, about 100 miles north of the capital.
NEWS
April 27, 1992 | MARK FINEMAN, TIMES STAFF WRITER
It was just after a quiet sunrise Sunday in a valley awash with spring that the first rockets ripped through the Mogul palaces of Afghanistan's ancient kings. Then came the staccato cracks of a dozen assault rifles. The earth trembled when a tank opened fire.
NEWS
February 15, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
Lt. Gen. Boris Gromov, commander of Soviet forces in Afghanistan, became the last Soviet soldier to leave the embattled country when he crossed into the Soviet border town of Termez at 9:55 a.m Moscow time today, the official Soviet news agency Tass reported. Today was the deadline for troop withdrawal under a U.N.-sponsored accord designed to end the nine-year Soviet intervention in Afghanistan.
NEWS
February 14, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The Red Army said farewell to Kabul in a ceremony at the frigid airport Monday, then paratroopers in padded uniforms decorated with Afghan medals were flown away. Some Soviet soldiers remained--although authorities declined to say how many--but officials said they will be gone by Wednesday, the deadline for the Kremlin to have all its forces out of a civil war it entered more than nine years ago. U.N.
NEWS
February 16, 1989 | MARK FINEMAN, Times Staff Writer
Flanked by guards posing for the television cameras, a gray-bearded Afghan rebel leader proclaimed here Wednesday that the Soviet withdrawal from Afghanistan was "one of the most unprecedented events of the last few centuries" and that it "defeated communism's philosophy all over the world as a whole."
NEWS
September 15, 1998 | From Times Wire Services
Iran's supreme leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, warned Monday that Afghanistan's Taliban rulers are stirring up a regional crisis and urged Muslim countries to intercede. Hours later, the independent Afghan Islamic Press reported that the fundamentalist Taliban had called for negotiations with Iran under U.N. laws.
NEWS
February 1, 1989 | From Times Wire Services
The top Soviet general in Afghanistan said Tuesday that once the pullout of his forces is completed by the Feb. 15 deadline, Moscow will no longer use its air power to support the Afghan government. The Soviet Union has been using air power increasingly since last fall to try to push back guerrilla forces besieging Afghan cities, and recently to help keep open a key highway from the Soviet border.
NEWS
July 17, 1987 | Associated Press
Soviet servicemen in Afghanistan have suffered heavier casualties since the United States began supplying modern weapons to Muslim guerrillas, a Soviet Foreign Ministry spokesman said Thursday. Those weapons "created additional difficulties for Afghan army and Soviet troops," deputy spokesman Boris Pyadyshev said at a regular government briefing. "This led to additional casualties among Afghan and Soviet troops and the air force."
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