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NEWS
March 8, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
With the Western world in a recession, Mozambique's leaders were wary last year of asking for too much emergency aid, even though one of the world's poorest countries was facing another year of dire need and possible famine. So they put out an international appeal for about half of the food they requested in 1989. In the event, they were still disappointed: only about half of the grain they asked for arrived.
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NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
After four decades and billions of dollars from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the nations of sub-Saharan Africa remain among the world's poorest. At the conclusion Saturday of an unprecedented African tour, bank and fund officials owned up to the failure of past policies and vowed to seek a new approach.
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NEWS
June 21, 1990 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
French President Francois Mitterrand challenged France's Western partners to follow Paris' lead in easing Africa's debt burden instead of giving the Africans lessons about democracy. In a speech at a Franco-African summit in La Baule, France, he announced a symbolic reduction of debt repayments to France by four African countries. Mitterrand acknowledged that democratic reform in Africa is inevitable, but he cautioned Europe against talking down to Africa.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | Reuters
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Tuesday that famine could still be avoided in the Horn of Africa but that the ongoing war between Ethiopia and Eritrea is deterring donors from sending aid. "If those who have the capacity to help do so, we might be able to avert a disaster," Annan told reporters after meeting with U.N. special envoy Catherine Bertini. Bertini unveiled a series of recommendations to help keep mass starvation at bay in the region at risk.
NEWS
January 31, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In moves that will seriously hamper development and famine relief programs in sub-Saharan Africa, the staffs of at least five U.S. embassies in the region have been wholly or partially cut back because of security concerns related to the Persian Gulf War. In at least one case, Tanzania, the State Department has ordered an evacuation of all non-essential embassy personnel and dependents because authorities received "specific and hard information about Iraqi-sponsored terrorism" threats to U.S.
NEWS
February 25, 2001 | From Associated Press
After four decades and billions of dollars from the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, the nations of sub-Saharan Africa remain among the world's poorest. At the conclusion Saturday of an unprecedented African tour, bank and fund officials owned up to the failure of past policies and vowed to seek a new approach.
NEWS
April 26, 2000 | Reuters
U.N. Secretary-General Kofi Annan said Tuesday that famine could still be avoided in the Horn of Africa but that the ongoing war between Ethiopia and Eritrea is deterring donors from sending aid. "If those who have the capacity to help do so, we might be able to avert a disaster," Annan told reporters after meeting with U.N. special envoy Catherine Bertini. Bertini unveiled a series of recommendations to help keep mass starvation at bay in the region at risk.
NEWS
June 22, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fast-growing U.S. economy won praise from leaders of the world's richest industrialized nations Saturday, but their blueprint for promoting global economic growth committed other countries to undertake painful domestic reforms. At the first such gathering with extensive participation by Russia, President Clinton, Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
September 11, 1988
Foreign ministers of the 101-nation Nonaligned Movement closed a four-day meeting in Nicosia, Cyprus, after adopting resolutions condemning Israel and South Africa. The ministers lamented "increased cooperation between Israel and South Africa" and expressed "indignation and dismay that certain Western nations . . . continued to aid and abet apartheid economically, financially, politically, diplomatically and militarily."
BUSINESS
December 1, 1987 | Associated Press
The chairman of the Organization of African Unity said Monday that industrialized nations helped create Africa's collective $200-billion debt and asked them to reconsider canceling all or part of Africa's debt. "Either we find effective and lasting solutions to the debt crisis now or we will continue to wallow in abject mass poverty for a long time to come," said Zambian President Kenneth Kaunda.
NEWS
March 17, 1999 | From Times Wire Services
President Clinton urged the world's richest nations Tuesday to relieve the debt burden of Africa's poorest countries. Addressing a three-day conference at the State Department of African government officials from 46 nations, Clinton said he will propose a plan to forgive $70 billion in debt held by developing nations in return for economic reforms when he goes to an annual meeting of the world's leading industrial nations in June.
NEWS
June 22, 1997 | TYLER MARSHALL and CAROL J. WILLIAMS, TIMES STAFF WRITERS
The fast-growing U.S. economy won praise from leaders of the world's richest industrialized nations Saturday, but their blueprint for promoting global economic growth committed other countries to undertake painful domestic reforms. At the first such gathering with extensive participation by Russia, President Clinton, Russian President Boris N.
NEWS
June 18, 1997 | From Reuters
President Clinton announced an economic development plan Tuesday that cuts tariffs for African countries reforming their economies and said he wants other industrialized nations to join his effort. "This is a moment of tremendous promise for the people of Africa," Clinton said.
NEWS
December 15, 1995 | SARA FRITZ, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Clinton administration was chastised Thursday by Democrats as well as Republicans for spending valuable foreign aid dollars on frivolous projects in South Africa, such as a $300,000 grant for hair care training. Senate Foreign Relations Committee Chairman Jesse Helms (R-N.C.), a longtime critic of U.S. assistance to South Africa, declared the entire program to be "a multimillion-dollar fiasco." And even strong supporters of the program, such as Sens. Nancy Landon Kassebaum (R-Kan.
CALIFORNIA | LOCAL
March 13, 1995 | CHARISSE ADAMSON and CALEB ROSSITER, Charisse Adamson, formerly assistant to the director of Save the Children in Somalia, is a research fellow at the Project on Demilitarization and Democracy, a Washington-based advocacy center. Caleb Rossiter, an author of foreign-aid studies, is the project's director.
The Republican "contract with America" has added a subsection on Africa. Along with the contract's call for sharp cuts in domestic social programs, Sen. Mitch McConnell of Kentucky, chairman of the subcommittee that handles foreign aid, has proposed a budget that would cut funding for African development as much as 50%. Hearings got under way this past week.
NEWS
June 11, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The shadow of famine again hangs over East Africa: In nine countries from Djibouti to Rwanda, 20 million people are at risk, relief agencies say, and international donors are scrambling to meet emergency needs for food. But there is disagreement in the international community over how advanced the threat is.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CHRIS McGREAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the three weeks since President Nelson Mandela's inauguration, a host of international organizations has rushed to embrace South Africa. The country's new flag flies in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the headquarters of the Organization of African Unity, once one of apartheid's bitterest enemies. On Wednesday, South Africa rejoined the British Commonwealth, more than three decades after it stormed out because of Commonwealth objections to its racist political system.
NEWS
June 3, 1994 | CHRIS McGREAL, SPECIAL TO THE TIMES
In the three weeks since President Nelson Mandela's inauguration, a host of international organizations has rushed to embrace South Africa. The country's new flag flies in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, at the headquarters of the Organization of African Unity, once one of apartheid's bitterest enemies. On Wednesday, South Africa rejoined the British Commonwealth, more than three decades after it stormed out because of Commonwealth objections to its racist political system.
NEWS
April 10, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
In an unprecedented summit, five Horn of Africa leaders met here Thursday to commit themselves to facilitating humanitarian programs in Sudan, Somalia and other places where civil wars have condemned more than 5 million people to death by starvation. They also pledged to try to force Somali warlords to end their ruinous conflict, possibly by sponsoring a peace conference. Many of the leaders have met before, but never has humanitarian aid been at the center of the agenda.
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