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January 1, 1995 | TINA SUSMAN, ASSOCIATED PRESS
Twenty-five miles from the highway, down a bone-rattling dirt road, near the murky river that forms the Liberian border, Jonathan Waah Howe stood in silent frustration while sacks of rice were loaded onto other refugees' heads and carried away. For reasons he did not understand, Howe was not among those getting the food handout, leaving him and dozens of other Liberian refugees to beg, buy, borrow and maybe steal to get by.
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NEWS
October 20, 1994 | STANLEY MEISLER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The Rwandan government denounced Foreign Minister Jean-Marie Ndagijimana on Wednesday, accusing him of fleeing to Paris with $187,000 needed to pay the bills of its embassy in Washington and its U.N. mission in New York.
NEWS
May 24, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The church was always safe. Everyone in Rukara knew that. It was the one place people could go when the Tutsis and Hutus started killing each other, as they have done periodically over the last 35 years--the one sanctuary that both sides honored.
NEWS
August 22, 1998 | DEAN E. MURPHY, TIMES STAFF WRITER
When it comes to bad guys in sub-Saharan Africa, it is hard to find one so universally despised as the government of Sudan. Despite deep sympathy for the country's starving thousands, its neighbors hate the regime in Khartoum. Many of its own people do too. And for the better part of five years, so has the U.S. government, which took the extraordinary step Thursday night of launching a missile attack on a suspected chemical weapons factory in the Sudanese capital.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha said South Africa's white government accepted a U.N. report recommending ways to halt political violence and urging a resumption of talks on non-racial rule. The report was prepared by the U.N. special envoy and veteran U.S. diplomat, Cyrus R. Vance, after a visit to South Africa in late July and approved by U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali Aug. 6.
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic convention of the African National Congress, which ended early Sunday, removed any doubt that supporters of the onetime guerrilla movement are committed to negotiations--but are also deeply suspicious of the white-controlled government. The result of that militant pragmatism is likely to be renewed clashes with the government over ANC protest marches and resistance campaigns, such as the occupation of empty white schools by pupils in severely overcrowded black schools.
NEWS
December 26, 1998 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The contagious sound of laughter and cheerful chatter greets teacher Julia Mukamutari on most mornings as she strolls past the local prison on her daily errands. On a typical morning, she waved at the throng of sweaty bodies crushed up against the bars of the jail. Some of the lean, adolescent figures smiled and waved back. Mukamutari knows them personally. Many of them used to be her students.
NEWS
February 9, 1990 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The government said Thursday that the security concerns holding up the release of jailed nationalist leader Nelson R. Mandela include threats against his life from both radical left-wing blacks and right-wing whites. "We want him to get out of that prison and walk the streets of our country as a free man . . . and alive," said Adriaan Vlok, the government minister of law and order.
NEWS
October 18, 1997 | JOHN DANISZEWSKI, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The men of Turalei are reed-thin giants, scraping the sky at 7 feet. Armed with spears and automatic rifles, they bear themselves with a regal dignity undented by the rags they wear or their empty bellies. And in recent days, they seem to be standing even taller than usual. After enduring 14 years of civil war, this corner of war-devastated southern Sudan has been "liberated" from the forces of the national government in Khartoum, 500 miles to the north.
NEWS
November 24, 1997 | ANN M. SIMMONS, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Clement Tshiaba, a foreign affairs editor at Kinshasa's Le Phare newspaper, is seeking work with a U.S. publication. It's not that he wishes to forsake his native Congo; rather, he is desperate for the opportunity to express his views freely, without fear of being arrested. The government of President Laurent Kabila does not take kindly to dissent. Neither did the regime of the late dictator Mobutu Sese Seko, which ended when he was overthrown by Kabila in May.
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