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NEWS
May 24, 1994 | DAVID LAMB, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The church was always safe. Everyone in Rukara knew that. It was the one place people could go when the Tutsis and Hutus started killing each other, as they have done periodically over the last 35 years--the one sanctuary that both sides honored.
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NEWS
May 12, 1994 | From Associated Press
Nelson Mandela included his chief black rival in the Cabinet of South Africa's first post-apartheid government on Wednesday and gave his estranged wife a deputy minister post. Zulu nationalist leader Mangosuthu Gatsha Buthelezi became home affairs minister, and Winnie Mandela was named deputy minister of arts, culture, science and technology. The 27-member Cabinet, which includes 18 representatives from Mandela's African National Congress, six from former president Frederik W.
NEWS
July 27, 1993 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Looking back on it now, Gen. Ibrahim Babangida's scheme for the perfect democracy in Nigeria, Africa's largest country and long an example for the continent, seemed a little too perfect. He created two parties and wrote their platforms--one a little bit right of center, the other a little bit to the left. To keep the process spanking clean, he decreed that no former politicians or military coup-makers, including himself, could run for office.
NEWS
November 14, 1992 | From Associated Press
Rebels ringed another key city Friday, and the government told guerrilla chief Jonas Savimbi he must give up all recent military gains to stop Angola from sliding back into civil war. Savimbi's troops already control about 60% of the country. On Friday, rebels encircled Malanje, the capital of the northern province of the same name, the state newspaper Jornal de Angola and Western diplomats said.
NEWS
August 14, 1992 | From Times Staff and Wire Reports
Foreign Minister Roelof F. (Pik) Botha said South Africa's white government accepted a U.N. report recommending ways to halt political violence and urging a resumption of talks on non-racial rule. The report was prepared by the U.N. special envoy and veteran U.S. diplomat, Cyrus R. Vance, after a visit to South Africa in late July and approved by U.N. Secretary General Boutros Boutros-Ghali Aug. 6.
NEWS
May 2, 1992 | NORMAN KEMPSTER, TIMES STAFF WRITER
For the past four decades, an era in which most African nations gained their independence, U.S. policy toward the continent has been driven by Washington's determination to check Soviet influence. This was true, even if it meant propping up corrupt, tyrannical dictators with little more to offer than anti-Communist rhetoric. Now, freed from the ideology of the Cold War, the Bush Administration has embarked on a program of encouraging genuine democracy in Africa. And U.S.
NEWS
February 11, 1992 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
Any unwitting observers who happened upon a public ceremony in a stadium near here recently could be forgiven for thinking they had strayed across the border into another country. Speaker after speaker evoked the name of the "Nation of Oromia," and the highlight was the presentation of degrees to 250 people who had just concluded a three-month course in Oromo history and language.
NEWS
December 17, 1991 | MICHAEL A. HILTZIK, TIMES STAFF WRITER
A few days after President Daniel Arap Moi announced the re-establishment of multi-party democracy in this country, thousands of Kenyans gathered for a demonstration downtown. Chanting slogans in support of a key opposition organization, they massed in front of a landmark of the movement: the American Embassy. Then they began an impromptu serenade, as it were, of Ambassador Smith Hempstone Jr. "Hempstone juu, Hempstone juu, " the demonstrators chanted in Swahili: "Up with Hempstone!"
NEWS
July 8, 1991 | SCOTT KRAFT, TIMES STAFF WRITER
The historic convention of the African National Congress, which ended early Sunday, removed any doubt that supporters of the onetime guerrilla movement are committed to negotiations--but are also deeply suspicious of the white-controlled government. The result of that militant pragmatism is likely to be renewed clashes with the government over ANC protest marches and resistance campaigns, such as the occupation of empty white schools by pupils in severely overcrowded black schools.
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